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  • 1. Strategy
  • 2. Part # 1: What do we do? Part # 2: Why do we do what we do? What is the purpose? Part # 3: What are the needs of our customers? Why do they have these needs? Part # 4: In which markets do we work? Why? Part # 5: What communication and distribution channels do we use – and why? Part # 6: Which types of capital do we have – and why? Part # 7: Who are our supplier partners – and why? Part # 8: How are we paid? Part # 9: Which management / leadership / culture will help make things work?
  • 3. Part # 1 What do we do?
  • 4. Products Customer experiences Services
  • 5. DiversificationMarket development New markets Product and/or service development Market penetration Present markets New products Present products
  • 6. A company’s strategy is determined by the types of initiatives that management invests in. Source Clayton Christensen. http://hbr.org/2010/07/how-will-you-measure-your-life/ar/pr
  • 7. Market share Cash cowsPoor dogs StarsQuestion marks Market growth Adapted from the bcg matrix.
  • 8. Market share Cash cows Look out for new “question marks” to invest in. Poor dogs Fix, sell, or close down. Stars Develop great concept further. Question marks Try out ideas with growth potential. Market growth Adapted from the bcg matrix.
  • 9. Cash cows Invest money generated from cash cows in ”question marks” / new promising ideas. Poor dogs  Stop investments.  Move out of business area.  Move out of market.Low growth Stars  Growth strategy.  Invest to stay innovative and efficient. Question marks  Select ideas with the largest potential.  Invest in ideas with the largest potential. High growth High market share Low market share Adapted from the bcg matrix.
  • 10. Sources http://www.quicksprout.com/2011/01/20/my-5-favorite-but-often-ignored-marketing-tactics/ http://images.businessweek.com/ss/08/02/0225_doodles/index_01.htm http://www.jarche.com/2010/05/heads-you-win-tails-you-lose/
  • 11. Source http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Strategy/Strategic_Thinking/Enduring_Ideas_The_business_system_2379 Example of tasks / activities / processes across the value chain
  • 12. By processes, we mean the patterns of interaction, coordination, communication, and decision making employees use to transform resources into products and services of greater worth. Such examples as the processes that govern product development, manufacturing, and budgeting come immediately to mind. Source http://hbr.org/2000/03/meeting-the-challenge-of-disruptive-change/ar/1
  • 13. Source Robert Kaplan. http://blogs.hbr.org/ideacast/2011/08/key-questions-for-leaders.html Let’s say you were starting over from scratch. Are the tasks, you do today, the tasks you would you? If yes, why?
  • 14. Source Magretta, Joan: “Understanding Michael Porter: The essential guide to competition and strategy”.
  • 15. Make yourself or buy / outsource?
  • 16. Source http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Strategy/Strategic_Thinking/Enduring_Ideas_The_business_system_2379
  • 17. Source: https://www.modifywatches.com/
  • 18. Source http://blogs.hbr.org/govindarajan/2012/05/telecoms-competitive-solution-outsourcing.html http://www.scribd.com/doc/31739272/Bharti-Airtel-Cases-Study-IIMK Bharti outsourced network installation, maintenance, and service to Ericsson, Nokia, and Siemens, and chose IBM to build and manage its IT systems.
  • 19. Jede unternehmerische Tätigkeit erfordert spezifische Fähigkeiten, die im Unternehmerteam nicht unbedingt vorhanden sind. Ihr Unternehmerteam muss sich deshalb überlegen, ob es im konkreten Fall Sinn macht, eine bestimmte Aufgabe selbst auszuführen, ob Sie die notwendigen Fertigkeiten erlernen wollen, oder ob es vorteilhafter wäre, die Aufgabe einer spezialisierten Firma zu übertragen. Quelle McKinsey & Company: “Planen, gründen, wachsen – Mit dem professionellen Businessplan zum Erfolg“, Seite 112.
  • 20. Source: http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/03/the_commoditization_of_scale.html How IT permeates the value chain
  • 21. Further information http://www.slideshare.net/frankcalberg/improve-the-customer-experience
  • 22. Part # 2 Why do we do what we do? What is the purpose?
  • 23. Further information http://www.slideshare.net/frankcalberg/what-is-the-company-purpose
  • 24. Part # 3 What are the needs of our customers? Why do they have these needs?
  • 25. Further information http://www.scribd.com/doc/56785190/Customer-Needs
  • 26. Part # 4 In which markets do we work? Why?
  • 27. 1. A street. 2. A village. 3. A part of a city. 4. A city. 5. A number of cities in a region. 6. A region of a country. 7. A country. 8. A number of countries. 9. A continent. 10. The world. Where are our customers? How do we define our market / markets?
  • 28. Make choices about where you will play, and where you won’t. Source http://blogs.hbr.org/video/2013/01/the-two-choices-to-make-in-str.html
  • 29. Questions about markets where we work  What are total sales in the respective markets?  How fast are total sales in the respective markets growing?
  • 30. DiversificationMarket development New markets Product development Market penetration Present markets New products Present products Ansoff matrix.
  • 31. Management’s overriding goal is to position a company and its products where the market opportunity is highest. Source https://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Best_practice_does_not_equal_best_strategy_809
  • 32. Examples of how a target market can be defined Question Examples Where are customers? In certain parts of a city? In a certain part of the world, for example Kenya? How do customers buy? Through internet, retail shop or other distribution channels? Who are target customers? People who need to feel safe? When do customers buy? On weekends? In the evening? For whom do customers buy? For themselves? For their customers? For their girlfriend / boyfriend? Source Strategy: An executive’s definition. http://www.strategy-business.com/article/cs00002?pg=all
  • 33. Early in its development, Southwest Airlines defined its target market to include regular bus travelers - people who wanted to get from point A to point B in the lowest-cost, most convenient way. Source Strategy: An executive’s definition. http://www.strategy-business.com/article/cs00002?pg=all
  • 34. Source Magretta, Joan: “Understanding Michael Porter: The essential guide to competition and strategy”, location 2550. When you go to a foreign market, remember that you are not trying to serve the whole market. You are looking for the segment that values what you do. So when you go to Spain, don’t try to compete like existing Spanish companies. Michael Porter
  • 35. Source: http://www.business-strategy-innovation.com/wordpress/2011/05/your-innovation-portfolio-is-precious/ Create new market Manage existing market High risk High reward Low risk Many competitors Customer experience Cost savings High risk Defensive strategy
  • 36. Further information http://www.frankcalberg.com/globalmarkets
  • 37. Part # 5 What communication and distribution channels do we use – and why?
  • 38. Direct distribution and / or indirect distribution Source Morris, Mike; Minet Schindehutt; Allen, Jeffrey: “The entrepreneur's business model: toward a unified perspective.” http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014829630300242X
  • 39. End Customers Retailer Wholesaler Agent Suppliers Your company Internet  Ideas  Knowledge  Money  Materials  Products
  • 40. To reduce the time it takes to distribute products to customers, Zara, Dell, and Timbuk2 work with production facilities that are close to end customers. Source http://hbr.org/2011/05/how-to-build-risk-into-your-business-model
  • 41. Instead of building large stocks of furniture, as its competitors do, MyFab provides a catalog of potential designs. Customers vote on them, and the most popular ones are put into production and shipped to buyers directly from the manufacturing sites - with no retail outlets, inventories, complicated distribution, or logistics networks. Source http://hbr.org/2011/05/how-to-build-risk-into-your-business-model
  • 42. Filesharing
  • 43. Social networking
  • 44. Further information http://www.slideshare.net/frankcalberg/pestel-technological-changes http://www.slideshare.net/frankcalberg/twitter-for-education http://www.slideshare.net/frankcalberg/11-advantages-of-using-a-blog-for-teaching
  • 45. Part # 6 Which types of capital do we have – and why?
  • 46. Further information http://www.scribd.com/doc/36349465/Capital
  • 47. Part # 7 Who are our supplier partners – and why?
  • 48. # 4 Bottle-neck ideas / knowledge / materials / products # 3 Non-critical ideas / knowledge / materials / products # 2 Strategic ideas / knowledge / materials / products # 1 Easily substitutable ideas / knowledge / materials / products. Sources Adapted from Kraljic, 1983. http://www.newpointconsulting.com/pdf/BeyondKraljic_DILF.pdf Number of suppliers Value that purchase has for the buyer
  • 49. # 4 Dependency of supplier. # 3 Market situation. Independent power position. # 2 Alliance situation. Collaboration possibility. # 1 Buyer dominance. Sources Adapted from Cox, A. et al., 2000. http://www.newpointconsulting.com/pdf/BeyondKraljic_DILF.pdf Buyer power resources Supplier power resources
  • 50. Part # 8 How are we paid?
  • 51. Further information http://www.slideshare.net/frankcalberg/how-are-people-paid-for-what-they-do
  • 52. Part # 9 Which management / leadership / culture will help make things work?
  • 53. Further information http://www.frankcalberg.com/leadership
  • 54. Thank you for your interest. For further inspiration, feel welcome to stop by at http://www.frankcalberg.com