Pp 11

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  • Pp 11

    1. 1. The Birth of Christianity
    2. 2. 1. The Greek World a. The Learning of Democracy b. The Birth of the Individual c. From Myths to Reason d. Women, Love and Homosexuality2. The Roman World a. From Republic to Empire b. Roman Society: Family and Values c. The Birth and Rise of Christianity
    3. 3.  Christianity: An outgrowth of Judaism Judaism Roman Catholic Church Roman Catholic Church CHRISTIANITY (1ST Protestant Church (16th century) CENTURY C.E.) Orthodox Church (11th century) Orthodox Church (11th century)
    4. 4.  Monotheist Fully sovereign: ruled all and subject to nothing Transcendent: above nature Attentive to human needs
    5. 5.  Elements of Jewish and Christian faiths Two parts:  The Old Testament  History of the Jews  The New Testament  History of the first century of the Christian Church Paul’s letter to the Romans  Gospels  Letters of Paul
    6. 6.  Oppressive world Disillusion Escape from oppression was sought Christianity as an answer: reason for living, immortality, etc.
    7. 7.  Coming of the reign of God All souls are equal Life is sacrosanct Beauty is spiritual, not physical Love = compassion, not eros Dignity in suffering Humility in face of providence Brotherhood of men Critique of Judaism
    8. 8.  Threatened ancient Jewish traditions Political agitator  God only is sovereign  Monotheism  City of man (temporal) < City of God (spiritual) Jesus before Pilate
    9. 9. 1. Belief in resurrection2. St. Paul’s teachings Christianity is also for non-Jews (universal religion) Resurrection of Jesus
    10. 10. St. Paul and his journeys
    11. 11.  Roman tolerance to religious diversity Christianity benefitted from association with the Roman empire (roads and universalism) Growing Roman worries  Subversives: alliance to God, not Rome  Did not accept state gods  No participation in festivals  Critique of violence  Refused to do military service
    12. 12.  Persecutions: Christians as scapegoats Effect: new converts! Christian martyrs in Colosseum
    13. 13. The Growing Number of Christians
    14. 14.  Constantine and the Edict of Milan (313 C.E.) Theodosius: Christianity becomes the state religion (392 C.E.) Christianity: A History (see questions) Theodosius I
    15. 15. Conclusion: A New Worldview The Classical Christian worldview: Worldview: A Human- A God-centred view centred viewIndividual Able to reason, to God loves him; should shape character behave righteously to according to rational enter heaven and standards shape character according to God’s willKnowledge Comes from reason Comes from faith; knowledge without God is purposelessUltimate good and Excellence attained Excellence attainedexcellence through one’s own efforts, through knowing, through independent obeying and loving thought and action, GodPurpose of life Enjoy life here and Be saved and have now, improve oneself eternal life and develop one’s capacities
    16. 16. 1. What are the different branches of the Judeo-Christian family?2. Enumerate the main characteristics of the Hebraic and Christian God.3. How historical is the Bible?4. What was Jesus’ message and what elements of context may have favoured its diffusion in the Roman empire?5. What factors explain the survival of Jesus’ message?6. Describe the relationship between the early Christian Church and the Roman authorities.7. How was Christianity a challenge to Roman values and institutions? Compare the Classical and Judeo-Christian worldviews.8. See questions on the documentary Christianity: A History.

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