THEINTELLECTUAL REPOSITORY                                     AKD      NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.                           ...
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Printed by J. 8. Hodlon. Croal Stred, HaUon aarden, London.
TBB     INTELLEOTUAL REPOSITORY·                                   AND              NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.               ...
THE INTELLECTUAL RBPOSITORYmillion, by calliDg OD men to repent J and bis Great Malter, also, be-gan his ministry by preac...
AND NEW JERUSALEM IIAGAZINR.                               3 In one of his epistles we find the words, f Godly ,orrow work...
TBB IKTBLLBOTUA.L RBPOSITORY~miDl of the        Lord, Ipiritual kingdom. Sin and holiueu, or bell and heaveD, cannot dwell...
AND NEW JHRUSALEM MA.GAZINE.                              5 that, afecLioDI take their form and beconle visible j he musL ...
6              TUE INTELLEOTUAL REPOSITORY  beautiful outward, but within il full of dead mens bones and all un-  cleannes...
AMD NBW JERUSALRM MA.GAZINB.er When the unclean spirit is gone out of 8 man, he walketb throughdry places, seeking rest, a...
8               THE INTELLECTUAL           REPOSITOR~      bear and obey. It is a duty, a privilege, ablessing to rrpent. ...
AKD NEW JERUSAL:lM MAGAZINB.                             9faith.   He mast be IOber and ~l.Dl; (or the It denl walketb abo...
10               THB   I~TKLLECTUAL       REPOSITORY time which   u   left a.: perchance it i. a rnnoaDt j it may be      ...
AND NBW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.                             11    EYiI, beiog oppo..-.d to good, can never be fayourable to it...
]2              THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORYTruth or laidl may be compared to the seed: but goodnesl or charityto the germ ...
AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.                              13between cbarity aDd faith were known and acknowledged; butiD it...
).(             THE INTBLLBCTO.6.L REPOIITORYstance., the spirit of the fallen Church, aDd of coune ha ye shared iDthe dil...
AND IfBW JEBUlALBJI II.£.OAZINB.                        16ravard their COUDtry, bum their cities.. and .pread desolation a...
16              THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORYwho i. not in8amed by the display of 10Ye, when it appears arrayedin heavenly b...
AND NEW JERUSA.LEM MAGAZINE.                                17 its fram~ and to awake to perception and feeling. Sometimes...
18              THB INTBLLBOTUAL REPOSITORYa couch. After we had refrelhed ounelyes at ODe common table, aDdbad puled some...
AND NEW J&RUSALBM MAGAZINE.                               19iipteDed Swedenborg &0 pomt 01H that correspondence and harlDO...
20              THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORYenchanting, when compared with the rising of the It SUD of righteous-ness" with...
AND NBW JRRDSALBM MAGAZINE.                             21how eould the DiYine Benevolence and Wisdom-bow could He who" we...
22               TUB INTELLEOTUAL RBPOSITORY     Wendiog my way amidlt tbese ruml of the mODDtains, I came to  a desolate ...
AMD NBW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.realities. It wal R mOlt ItnKing emblem of a mind devastated by thehostile powen of e"iI and fa...
24               THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORY   and distinctly discern 10 great a yariety of objects, wha~ must be the   vi...
AND NSW JERUSALEM MAGAZINB.                           25 species of goodness and virlue, and a majestic rifer which fertil...
THE INTELLBCTUAL REPOSITOayof later philosophen, .. compreheoding die lotIe of all           ,A.                          ...
AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.                  BOOJl tU from tartb 1 [tie ",frit) 10,                    What will b..come o...
THE INTELLECTUAL REP091TOllY    trumpet, however, is DOt to lound, perhaps, for ages after,) and Ihm    will see the world...
AND N2W JZaUSALBM MAGAZINB.      " no. art cone to tbe graN, ueI     its lDuaIoo forsaking.         Perhaps tA, tried .pir...
30              THE INTELLEOTUAL REPOIITORY  him but little, because his heart is let upon thing. of an intrinsically  hig...
AND NBW JERUI.ALKM MAGAZINB,                            31 &0 the gratification of coriolity than to the production of any...
32              TtlB INTELLEOTUAL          REPOSITORY ON THE DUTY OF PROMOTING THE CONVERSION                           OF...
AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.                            33    Troly, then, it may be said" that we iee numbers of our breth...
34              THB INTBLLECTUAL R.EPOSITORY   a Dimne Man, is in possession of a foundation upon wb~ch the altar   of the...
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839
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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839

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The intellectual repository_periodical_ 1838-1839

  1. 1. THEINTELLECTUAL REPOSITORY AKD NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE. VOL. V. FOB THE YEARS 1838 AND 1839. LONDON:Pri1tUd aad Puhli,lud for the General Ccmference of t!ae NeUJ Ck.Tela ,ignified by tJu NetD Jeru,akm in the 1lft,e1ation, BY J. S. HODSON, 112, FLEET STREET; AID SOLD BY SJMPKIN, HAaSHAL1., .AMD CO., ITATIOlC&aS HALL COURT, LlJDOAT& ."ILKa. 1839.
  2. 2.
  3. 3. Printed by J. 8. Hodlon. Croal Stred, HaUon aarden, London.
  4. 4. TBB INTELLEOTUAL REPOSITORY· AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE. N° XLIX.-!lalluar». 1838. ON REPENTANCE.ON the fint day of the year, we know that man lometimel devote. his mind to seriouI reSection. Hie atteJltioD i. once more arrelted, and tumed to consider the end for which he wa. brougbt into hem•• He was created that he might become eternally happy, by rea1iziDg dieheavenly state j and he thiDks, and sighs to think, how little that greatobject has been attended to. The retrospect of his bY~De yean ispainful to bil view. The one tbiug needful hal Dot been chosen:riSes light as air have engaged and engroued. his attention. Allaround is darkness and gloom; there iI a brigbtneas, but he has Dota«aioed it. He see. but the wreck of things,-taleDt. waited, timemisspent, opportunities neglected and lo.t for eyer. He i. a fearfultri8er on the stage of human life. He hear. a voice, aayiDg, tRe-pent; lor the kingdom of heayen is at handi" and the worda fan likea startling knell on his ear. He resolves afresh to tam himself Zion-.anl; he ",ill tom aDd repent, for thi. indeed mut be dODe. Re-pentaDce must be done, or all is 101t. It i. thus tbat a man communes with himself wllen he enters DpoDa new year. He IIcknowledges the duty of repentaDce, and purposelto do it. In IUCh • case, he ougbt to know well the true Datare ofIUtb • doty, or he will not be able to do it aright. This it is iDl-portaDt be shoold know; for it iDvolves the best interests of the soul.I" is that we may aid an enquiring mind in th~ matter, that we writethe present paper, wherein we intend to treat on a subject 10 uselu1 initself, aDd 10 appropriate on commencing a new period in life. Weshall conaider, at IOme length, the great duty of repeDtaDce. Weshall preaeut it in the light of holy scripture, and the doctrines of theNew Church. The .object DOW ltefore UI i. one which hold. a leading place In theaacred yolome. In &he old teatament, what calls, what exhortatioDI tofepeDtaDce! ID the golpets we find, that John the Baptist begua hia NO. XLISe-VOL. V. B
  5. 5. THE INTELLECTUAL RBPOSITORYmillion, by calliDg OD men to repent J and bis Great Malter, also, be-gan his ministry by preaching repentance. Both of them said, " Re-pent J (or the kingdom of heaven is at hand" (Matt. iii. 2; iv. 17).Jesul said, If Except ye repen, ye shall all likewise perish" (Luke xiii.5). The apostl~, Cl went ou~ and preached, that men should repent"(Mark vi. 12). Jeso! instructed them, U that repentance Rnd remissionof sins should be preached in his name among all nations" (Lukexxiv. 47). Peter preached repentance (Acts ii. 38; Hi. 19); and Paulpreached that I t Dlen evt»ry where should repent" (Acts xvii.-SO). Inthe Revelation, the Lord, in addrelling the seven churches, calls themrepeatedly to repentance. For example, to the church of Ephesus beuhh, "I will remove thy candlestick out of its place, except thou re·peRt"(ii.2). More might be added if it were necessary, to shew thatrepentance il indispensable, and that without it, no man can posaiblybe lafed. From what bas been adduced, we may see plainly that repentancei. aD important lubject. It should always be taught as earnestly inthe church u it was taugbt by the Lord and his apostles. But is thisindeed done? Do the present teachers in Israel mak.e repentance thefoundatioD-atone of religion ~ We know, alas! that they do not. Weknow.that tbe doctrines of faith alone, free grace. imputed righteous- Deas~ 8te. are made the criteria of Cl orthodox. .. belief. If repentancebe at all alluded to~ it is done in a way to e,ince that it is little esti-mated or thought of: it is mystified, Rnd explained away~ into a con-temptible insignificance. The preYailing errors are such, that w batW81 taught by the Lord and his apostles respecting repentance, islost upon mankind. The subject of repentance is not understood: men are ignorant ofits real nature. Tbeyare wont to say in ordinary discourse, that, theyfepa of haring done this or tbat thing; which means, that they arelOrry for having done it, and wish they had acted otherwise; and thisidea goes with them wben they think 011 repentance as a religioustluty. It is commonly explained to mean, a Cl godly sorrow for lin.with aD intention of future amendment." Thil godly sorrow we mayproperly call contrilion. It may, as they conceive, instantaneously t.ake place, and the p~nitent is then entitled to abaolutioD. Vhen sinsare thus forgiven, they are thought to be taken away, and man i. made a child of grace. According to this view, a man may repent withoutamendment. But let us hear what one of the apostlel .y. actually amending his life; for it only requires an intention of futureIUbject j that apostle wbose writiDgs are 10 loperemineDtly prized. on the
  6. 6. AND NEW JERUSALEM IIAGAZINR. 3 In one of his epistles we find the words, f Godly ,orrow worketb re.~tance unlo salyatioo"(2 Cor. vii. 10)~; Here, it is plain, thal he doe. not undentand godly sorrow 0be repentance, but that it ptec«le. it; which is quite anotber thing. In the verse before this quotaUoD, he makes the same distinction between sorrow and repentanc~ What, then, is real repentance? We reply J It is tJ change of mind j a cbange in the Itate of maD a life. The mind i. the DIaD himself; it is the real man. A changed state of the mind is a change of the af-fections and thoughts, with their aclivities in outward life. It is Dottafe to be guided by lexicographers in" their definitions of ,...".0••, i. e.le repentance; It {or they may err in conceiviog what the religious dutyis which it enjoins. We may expect that they will be influenCed bythe doctrinal opinioDs they may bold. Besides, it is 8 fact, that theyare Dot agreed, as to what that Greek word implies in a theologicalsense. With some it is naade to denote Cl a change of mind, pur-pose," &c. It sbould ahvRys be remembered, that abstract terms areonly conventional symbols of ideas. If we consider tbe circamltaDcesUDder which repentance was command~d in the Gospel, we may beable to lee clearly in what that doty consists. It W88 preaehed whenthe Lord made his advent to redeem Dlen from their sins, and establi.hhi. kingdom on the earth. They were imolened in wickedneu, andbe would make them righteous. We reRd that "John the Baptiat.came preaching in the wilderness of Judea, and laying, Repent ye Jfor the kingdom or heaven is at hand. For this is he that was spokenof by the prophet Esaias, saying, Tbe voice of one crying in the wil-demess, Prepare ye the way of the Lord, make his paths straigbt"(MI,tt. iii. 1-3). He called his baptisol tbe It baptislG of repeDtance.~Now, the wilderness represented the staLe of the church at that time,or ot the minds of men. in which there was nothing good and rue.To prepare the Lords way, and make straight his paths, wa., to re·wo,e the things which opposed his entrance; implying, in the ,piri.oal idea, to pu~ away from their minds whatever was contrary to thatkingdom of goodness and truth, which he came to establi.h. Baptism.ymbolized the washing away of sins, or removal of them from themind, which i. the lame as to prepare the Lord. way in the wilder.DelS. This was Johns 11 repentance j " tbe reason for it being, that.. the kingdom of heaven was at baud." This was a change in the mindsof meD; for wben • man, from living in sin, begins to remove it; oroppose it in himself, his mind is in a state of change. It was ~e8­sat) to make luch a preparation, just as it is necessary for the mind of every man to be prepared, by the puuiDg away of evil, for Lhc B2
  7. 7. TBB IKTBLLBOTUA.L RBPOSITORY~miDl of the Lord, Ipiritual kingdom. Sin and holiueu, or bell and heaveD, cannot dwell together in the same mind. It would be like the dwelliug of wolves, ligen, and vultures, with Iheep, kids, and dOYeI. It is thul with man and the Lord. As evil beasts mUlt be removed before harmlels ones can be introduced, even 10 mUlt the evU. in mans nature be put away, before the Lord, with heavenly graces, caD enter and dwell in the mind. This then repentance.is It is a change of the miod, or the putLiug away of evils al sins. 1& eanlistl of every thing by which man ceases to will and to do what. ever is eYi1nd linful. It is an actual work. It is as diferent frolD mere I f godly sorrow, It a, any substance il from the shadow which goes before it. That .orrow is only contrition: it has certainly some connection with repentance i lor when a penon is awakened to a doe sense of the awful nature of liD and its cODsequences. he will, of couue, lament over his previous folly, and purpose amendment. In thi. way c. it willl«Jd, if he fulfil his resolutions, to that actual change of life t t which we have described; Beconling to the apoltle. words, that " godly IOrrow workdb repentance." BaYing now given a general view ol repentaDce, we proceed to par- ticulars. H, as wa. laid, it coDsi.ts of every thing by which evil is put away, it will be obYiously seeD to comprise the three. following dutiea,m. self-examinatioD, confession of ains, and their actual re-Dllnciation. The neceslity of the first is seen (rom the fact, that un-.ail eYils are explored, they cannot be discovered and known. Without tbi., man cannot know himself and biB spiritual llate. He mo.t be6ke the merchant, who 6amiDe8 from time to time hi. aCCOQDta, thatbe may know his lossel or his gainl; or, like the mariner, who aacer-&aiDI his place upon the water., that he may come to hi. destination iDaafety. At fint it is diticult for a man to examine himself J but if hepersevere, it will loon become easy. * And iD 80 examiaing hil .tate,be mUlt not consider hiloutward actionI only, bot also the delire.aDd motiYeI which actuate his conduct. Estemal work. are ooly ef.feda proceeding (rom causel in the mind, which causes Ihould belOught out with especial care aDd attention: these, being the end.&Dd afedioDl of hil life, are what consuta&e the real maD. He is tokDOW if he be in the lovel of lelf and of the world, after first learningwba thoae loves precilely are. To know what are the lOfts of thewill, he mUlt consider what occupies hi. thoughY, for it i. in these • The It Head. ofSell.examinatioD," eontained in tbat excelleot work, le "-Delp to PamilJ aad Pri"ate ne"otioo: by the Rn_ W.Muoa, are euDeItI, N. reM."comaaeaded to tile atteatioD.
  8. 8. AND NEW JHRUSALEM MA.GAZINE. 5 that, afecLioDI take their form and beconle visible j he musL watch, with careful solicitude, the hourly current of his thoughts, especially when alone j and further, he must not ouly think upon what he is ac- ,gaily doing, liS to his thougbLs and deeds, but what be fain would do, if DO laws or circumstances restrained him, and he were free to do allhis pleasure. He will in this way go to the root of Lhe tree: he mustbriog every thing .to the ordeal of divine truth. The second dULy we have mentioned, is the confession o~ aina. TocODfess our lins is not simply for a man to declare viLh bia lips thathe is a sinner, {or words alone are mere vocal expressions, and of DOreal use if they are DoL the result of ideas and thoughts: it is to seeaDd know evill in the mind and practice; to acknowledge them asaiDS; to think them abominable, and to condemn ones-self as thedoer of them: when this is done before the Lord the Saviour, audsupplication made to him for mercy, forgi veoeS8, and power to resistems, it is truly the confessions of sins. Men generally think, thatmttre lip-confession, and this, too, of sins universally, is sufficient; andthey will say, that they are nothing but sin from head to foot, whilethey are unconscious of a single evil in tbemselvel: they emit 10 con-iider the parlicular evils of which their sin consists. But bring homesome of the evils that men may be kllOWD to commit: tell the preacherof his pulpit-aifectation, and his want of humility; say to the man ofaloth and ease that he is not perfornling uses; tax the avaricioul manwith extortion; describe 10 tbe man of wealth how riches are not tobe milapplied; she" to the housewife her mismaoagement; to the mo-ther her negligence; and to my lady, her vanity and pride :-<10 thesethiDgs, and you will find that, although in their prayers tbey confessthemaelvea sinner., they will take offence, instead of owning the par-ticular evils you have pointed out: you will then be convinced, that &0call ones-self an evil doer is a very different thing from seeing andmowing evils in delailJ and oWDiDg them to be sins. 0 no; it i. theImguage of lying lips when a person says that he confesses himself aamner, and yet will not plead guilty to each of the evils he commits,"hen they are presented to his mind. He iI, indeed, a ainaer, but hedoea not make the confession of it. The third duty is the actual renunciation of sin. This is the prin-cipal work, the sum and substance of repentance. But in this, 8S inaelf-uamination, man muIt Dot only attend to his external practice,but to the purposes and desires of his heart. If he ..atisfy himself.illa merely regulating his words and actions, he will be like a woundwIdcb is but externally healed) or like a whiled sepulchre, which i.
  9. 9. 6 TUE INTELLEOTUAL REPOSITORY beautiful outward, but within il full of dead mens bones and all un- cleanness. He must have especial regard to the secret imaginings of his mind,and diligently resist every unholy and uncharitable affection, as it manifests itself in the thoughts. When alone with himself, he muat watch, and shun, every thought which is sinfol; he must shun the ways of temptation and the appearance of evil; he must have re- gard to what are thought to be venialfaultl; and also to SiDS of omis- sion. For example: he must avoid every thiDg of pride, conceit, le- vity, and foolishness; idle and frivolous discourse; unkind words and tenlpers; rudeness and eccentricity; idleness and selfish ease; inordi- nate indulgence; repining and fretfulness j unwillingness to read the Word and its authorized exposilioDs j inattention to the duties of piety; neglect and disorder of whatever kind: and he must not think of cherishing some sins while be puts away others; he must ShUD every known ain without exception. Nor must he work by fits Bnd start" ; repenting to-day and falling ofi again to-morrow. He must shun evils one day and every day; at all tinles and in all places j in business or in pleasure; alone or in company; at home or abroad. His work. must be constant and continual, until sin is subdued; ~yea, he must re- pent daily during all his stay on the earth. He must also be careful, in shunning evils, to do so frolD a proper motive; he must shun them 81 sins against God. He must not consider that this or that evil is con- trary to his interests; but the language of his heart must be, fhe Lord has forbidden this; it is sin, and, therefore, I shun it. It is thus t.hat evil is to be shunned in thought and in deed. All these duties must needs appear at first sight to be arduous; but it is worthy of re- mark, that if man begins to do them, he soon acquires to himself ahabit, which is strengthened and confirmed by perseverance. He be- gin., as it were, to ascend steps, and every succeeding step becomes more easy. By these duties of actual repentance, a way is preparedfor the Lord to descend into the human mind, with the graces andvirtues constituent of the heavenl) state in man. He is thus regene-rated, and made an heir of the k.ingdom of God. Vhen the christian penitent hRS attended to the duties describedabove, he must, above all things, continue steadfast in goodness, evento the end olliCe. If be relapse into his (ornler evils, and live in them,he vill CODlmit the awful sin of profanation, which is worse than astate of unmixed evil: it is worse, because it conjoins evil wit.h goodin the S31ne mind. This is taught by the Lords words to the manWhOID he bad healed at the pool of Bethesda, "Sin no more, lest aworse thing come upon tbee"(John v. 14). Again, wbere he aaitb,
  10. 10. AMD NBW JERUSALRM MA.GAZINB.er When the unclean spirit is gone out of 8 man, he walketb throughdry places, seeking rest, and findeth no~e. Then he saith, I will re·turn DDto my house from whence I came out; and when he is come,be findeth it empty, swept, and garnished. Then goeth be, and takeLhwith himself seven other spirits more wicked than himself; and theventer in and dwell there: and the la, ,tate of that man u wor.e tha~hefir,"·(Matt. xii. 43-45). This, then, is repentance. It is thus, and thus only, that the churchis formed in man. Proceed we now to some considerations of apractical nature connected with this important subject. With such a view of repentance, how very solemn Bre the circum-atanceI in which all men are placed! " Except ye repent, ye shall alllikewise perish." It Repent, or I will remove thy candlestick ont olita place." These are words of eternal truth. It they are duly heark- ened to, all is gained; if nol, all is lost for which man was brought intoexistence. To do them is true wisdom i to neglect them is folly indeed. They enjoin a great duty; yea, it is tlte duty oC duties with man. "1 W81 born," said a father of the church, Cl for nothing butrepentance." Can any thing be urged which should induce a man to neglect thegreat duty which we have described? Will it lessen his happiness 1No, it ",ill increase it; it will fill it to the full. Will it deprive himof his ricbes l It will not j it will leach him how to use and enjoythem. It will deprive him of nothing but "hat he n1ayafford torelinquish with every kind of advantage. Does anyone say that hecan spare no time for repentance ~ Is be oppressed with worldlycares, with toils, with business? Ve reply, It will not rob hhn oftime, Dor take him out of the world" It will teach him order,method, and the best use of time. It vill help and strengthen him:it will relieve him in trouble, support bin) in duty I and guide himin every work. It is often objected, that repentance la)s on mana heavy cross. But does the world lay no crosses on men? Does he who pursues pleasure, greatness, Came, or riches, meet with no crosses, no troubles in life 1 0 yes, it is known that the loves of self and the world are cruel taskmasters indeed. The Lordl tf yoke is easy" and his fC burden light." The cross of the Christian is not 10 heavy al is thought, and it is made lighter as he bears it, until he, at length, lays it down for ever. The ways of religion are inviting and encouraging to man. fhe Lord calls and intreats him: angels wait to assist him, and guide his step to beaven. He is urged by every consideration of duty, of gratitude, and .of interest, to
  11. 11. 8 THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITOR~ bear and obey. It is a duty, a privilege, ablessing to rrpent. hy, then, 11 why will ye die, 0 house of Israel f When is ,the ime for repentance 1 We reply It is nOID. NOrD is J the accepted time, nOlD is the day of salvation: Are you young and in health l There is no time, no state, so favourable as this. Are you old and infirm 1 Then hasten to repent; hasten, and tarry noL This duty is to be done when man is in freedom of mind: if left to a dying bed it will not save him, because at luch a time he acts from compol- sion, arising from the fear of death. When man is in any way constrained, or compelled, he does not act of himself, or of his own free determination. He is gifted with the faculties of liberty and reason; by which the Lord and the life of heaven may be received into his soul; and it is only when these are iD exercise that he can do saving work. 0 how great is the folly of procrastination! Against this, man needs to be especially warned. He is led by the wiles of his great adversary to lose the precious hours which are passing over him. He is induced to put oft repentance: to-morrow will b. better &han to-day i there will be ample time in the coming future. But alaa! he knows not .hat shall be on the. morrow; be knows not what a day may bring forth. To-day he may labour, but to-morrow it may be too late. His great Exemplar said, It I Dlust work the works of him that sent me w bile it is day: the night cometh when no man can work"(John ix. 4). Even if man knew that his days would be prolonged, it would still be folly to procrastinate, for his work becomes the more difficult by delay. As evil is cherished, it increases; just &I a tree grows from year to year, and extends its roots in the earth. It is like the disease called gangrene, which, if not cured in time, spread. all around its infection, and causes inevitable death. It is like a fire, which, if not extinguished, will soon consume a whole city or forest. Repeotance should not be delayed, no, not {or an bour. To think tbat to-morrow· will be better than to-day, is quite a delusion. Felix waited for a convenieRt seaSOD, but we are not informed that luch a aeason ever came. It is folly, it is worse tban folly, to delay; a fatal security of Jife is indured. When repentance is begun, there must be no supineness of spirit.The soul muat be kept in a wakefu] state. The Christian is to regardhimself as engaged in an active, yea, a busy work. It is a race whichis aet before him, and he must lay aside every weight, and run it withpatience. He mUlt salute no man by the way. He must not turneither to the right or to the left, but walk unmoved in his Saviour·.Itepl, and look steadfastly to him, as the Author and Finisher of his
  12. 12. AKD NEW JERUSAL:lM MAGAZINB. 9faith. He mast be IOber and ~l.Dl; (or the It denl walketb aboutas a roaring lion leekiag whom he may devour" (1 Peter v. 8).a~There is a perpetual endeavour from the hell. to do evil" (A. C.6477).The Psalmist laid, " I will not come into the tabernacle o( my houle,Dor go up ioto my bed; I will not give Ileep to mine eyes, nor Ilumberto mine eyelids; until I find nut a place for the Lord" (csxxii. 3,4,5).And the Preacher laid, " Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do icwith thy might; for tbete is DO work, nor device, nor knowledge, norwildom, in the grave, whither thou goest" (is. 10). We have laid enough OD repentance. It wu deemed useful toCODsider thi, lubject on commenciDg a new year. We have said that&hi. is a time for serious meditation. How silent, yet how rapid, isthe march of time I How quickly our past years have glided away!They are DOW as a tale that id told; they are past 81 the vision of adrean.. We are huteniDg forward OD tbe Itream of time, and shallIOOD be numbered among the tbings tbat have heeD. The place tbatnow seetb UI shall soon see dS no more (or eyer. We are slrauger.and pilgrim., as all our fathers were. We are u guests in a strangeplace. who tarry but for nne night. ADd it is thUI with all the joys ofearth. The hopes and promises which allured UI when life wuyoung. have not been realized. If, perchance, they put forth andblollomed, they perished before they were grown up. Our pleasuresare never aati.fying i they pall upon the lense. Our trealurea makethemselyes wings" and 8y away: a breath of wind scatten them, andthey are gone. Fame, fortune, bonours" power, and greatnell, arethings that tempt, and then deceive UI. Where are the mends ofour youth} One by one they bave dropped into the grave; and soon we shall follow them. Death, like a rushing wind, sweeps daily tbe earth, and scatter. as leavei its ephemeral inhabitants. It il thuI we eadare (o~ a little while, and tbeD pass away. We bave no continuing city here j thil world is Dot our rest. Let us, with the opening year, set out afresh towards Zion. Let the folly and negligence of our days which are put be a lalutary warning for those which are to come. Let us think, and thiDk often, OD the ftlue of time. Time il Dot 8 gift, it is a trust-it il a talent for which w~ mUlt render -account. Eternal consequences are involved iD 0G1" " . of the present time. The hours now on the wing are fraught _ woe, or with blessing, (or ever. And tbere is DO standing stUI i ...... woold .bnd ltill will fall. As tiole advances, we progress: we . . 6IIiIIg upoDr ltates of good or of evil•.Time, then, how precioul ! I amao& be estimated-we cannot aay ill worth. Let us improve th• • 0. XLIX. ~OL~ v. C
  13. 13. 10 THB I~TKLLECTUAL REPOSITORY time which u left a.: perchance it i. a rnnoaDt j it may be err short. Let UI redeem it j let us die daily. Let us Die each day as if it were the first of our repentance, and the last of our ltay on the earth. Let UR be aroused; let us trinl onr lanlps; let us no more slumber nor sleep. Let UI be eyer engaged in an Rctive preparation for bea9~n. And let UI put OD all the armour of God. Let 01 add the duties of piety to those of repentance. Let us study the Vord, be attentive to prayer. receive the holy .npper, fulfil our ubbath dutie!, and all things required of those who are Dlembers of the Church. Let us have rfSp~ct to .11 the commandments. Let our obedience be an integral work: let ita duties be as a golden cbain••bOle links are made for eAch otller, Let our new Bfe be 81 a web which is entire j the length And breadth equal, the testure perfect. ThuI mud we live j thuI must we repent. ".e sball in this way ripen, dBy by day, for heayen. We sball prepare for the SOD of Man when be cometh. We .ball be al lerftntl waiting for their Lord. If he come at even or at midnight, at the cock-crowing or in the morning. we sball be ready. Vitb 10iDS girt and "itJIlan1ps burning, we shall welcome the bridegroom, BDd enter into the joy of our Lord. x. ON CHARITY AND FAITH. Wa.K the lacred Word of Dirine Truth is strained to make it teachthat faith, regarded by itself alone, il the one thing needfuJ,-tbat s&1-yation depends OD it,-that it lecures the blealiDgs of forgiveness aDda title to eternallile,-that good works are only evidences of salva-tion, aDd not conducive thereto; and when the evil cODsequences ofluch a doctrine are 10 ,i.ible in the universal reign of a1f~Joe overreligion itlelf; we C8DDot be too careful, iD marking with clear andwell drawn lines, the true di.tinction between charity and faith, thoseellential principlel of all true religion, aDd in oblerving their relationand umOD. Nothing CaD more strongly prove the tendency of evil to turo truthinto error, and make it fayour itl own propensities, than the factthat, while the plain letter of scripture is maintained as being the allor nearly 10, of diviDe revelation, 8 doctrine 10 0ppolite to tbe ob"iou;declarations and precepts abounding tbroughout. the Holy Word~aboul~ be able t~ stAnd upon any thing having the lealt appearanceof sCripture tesLlmony.
  14. 14. AND NBW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE. 11 EYiI, beiog oppo..-.d to good, can never be fayourable to ita cooaort, truth i it finds DothiDg, however, more agreeuhlr, thaD to prostitute the truth by falufying it, aod then subjecting it to ita own vile purposea. This is proved to be the case, by the use which has often been n.ade of tbe Sacred Scriptures, to C8l1otenilnce and support every atrocity of lust and cruelty of which fallen nature has beeD capable. How necessary, therefore, is it (or everyone to be continually OD hi.guard, lest aD evil affection should at any time incline him to pervertthe instruction of I>irine Truth. Nothing can be more evident to thetruly obedient mind, searching the Scriptures for .olid wiadoDl, thanthe subserviency of all truth to the purposes of goodness. This i.the test to which we are iDstructed to bring all ductriae. The Lord,iD cautioniDg his disciples to beware of false prophetal by which aresigni6ed doctrines, said, Cl By their fruits ye shall kDOW them." Adoctrine may look very much like truth j it may eVeD appear to as uaublime and beaaLiful truth i we act unwisely, however, if we receive itN such, wbile it faill to yield to tbe affections an ioftoence of good-DeA, and to produce a corresponding righteoumeu in the life. Wemay be right iD lookiag at it, in examining, and eveD in admiring itJbut Dot in enlbracing it, until we discover the marb of its geDuiD~De..in &he goodness to which it leads: until we haye put it to this test,we should not suffer ourselves to be fucin8wd by the beau,y of itaform or the splendour of ita aspect: for how can we know} it maybe a satan in an angela garb. However harmless it may seem, itlproper dispolition,-ita natural appetite, should be fint ascertaiDed i lestwe be deceived with a wolf iD Ibeeps clothing. If charity be not ita&Ie. good workl will Dot be its fruita: and we know that a good treeC8DDO& briDg forth em (rait,80y more than aD enl tree can producegood (ruit. TbUI, tbeo, we see that cbarity is tile essence of truefai&bl aDd that the faith which bas not cbarity u its loul i. 8 falaefaith. To let up faith, therefore, except for the sake of Lbe charityof which it is the form, as the ODe thing needful, u the grace that18ftII, is to let up al the chief good the Very eueDtial form of hellitIeIf: for "ha are the subjecta of the infemal kingdom, but 10 many. . . of reeeption failing to receiYe the influence of beaveD~ and COD-1IIJIIIIdI16Ded and distorted by inftoencea of an opposite cbaracterl bynil, .... i., instead of good. We _ , Dot ooly leam the superiority of goodnels to truth, aDd,tIIIre6Iret of charity to faitb, in the instructioDl of the Holy Word,... wlam eDligbtened by its truths, may see this same principle ex-..,.... iD other &bingl: that truLh inlUUcts, but goodneu vivifies. c2
  15. 15. ]2 THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORYTruth or laidl may be compared to the seed: but goodnesl or charityto the germ within it. However perfect may be the form of the seed;whatever pain. may be taken &0 plant it in a good soil and favourableatmolphere: if the gerol be defective, it will only moulder and rot.Accordingly, the Church, .. it became destitute of goodnell,IOlt thetruth: the weeds of falae doctrine quickly ovenpread the soil; butbe heavenly leed perished. Again: Truth or faith may be comparedto a beautiful aogelic form, in the attitude of jUlt mounting from theearth, pointing with one hand towards heaven, and ofreriug the otherto lead us thither: but goodness or charity may be compared to theprinciple of augelic life. If this be vanting, ,ye may be delightedwith the form, but it will never advance with us Wvards that atate towhich it points; it "ill prove to be merely al a atatue of cold marble.AgaiD : Truth or faith may be compared to a clear rUDDiug stream ofpure water, aDd good Dell or charity to tbe principle of genial varmthwhich occalioDI its fluidity: but truth or faith alone, may be com-pared to the same Itream when winters northern blasts have atopt itslowing, and hardened it into ice; in which state the cattle can neitherwuh themselYes in it, nor anay their thirst thereby. A code of doc-mnes which inducel merely the exercise of the underataoding, ,,·itbout.ffecting the heart nth goodness, or which teacbea that faith alone i. the all of salvation, may be comJlred to a feast unto which ,,·e areinvited. We enter a room expenaively fumi.hed and brilliantly de-corated: the tables of costly wood, well laden with services of mal- live silver and YeBlels of pure crystal: but, when the covers are re- moved, iDstead of delicious viands, we behold Dothiog but the mouJel.. ered and mouse-eaten remains of lame former teaat, and instead of regaling on daintiel, we retire sickened with the light and ameU of filth and corruption. It is because charity, aB the life or lOul of true faith, i. the grace that uyel, that the performance of good workl i. so inculcated iD the Word. Were faith alone lulicient for: la1tatiOD, good workl might be dispensed with; but aiDce it is charitytb"at muat reDder us fit for the kiDgdom of heaven" and that cannot esiat Dcept ea it comes forth into the outward life, therefore the I"ord mercifully desires, &ha hie comolandmenta should be obeyed, as well .1 knowD. ADd beeaa. every act of genuine obedience ia in its euence love-love to God or &h. neighbour; dlerefore &he new commandment which &.be Lord gave to hi. disciplel WBI the summary of the whole law: ff Love ODe anotber." .. By the Primitive Chris~i.D Churcb, the diatiDctioD and rel.doD
  16. 16. AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE. 13between cbarity aDd faith were known and acknowledged; butiD ita degeneracy, it bas disregarded the living principle. and trusted foreternal ore to faith alnne. And what is now to be seen as the resultof this} What could be npected bllt diYisions and delolation? Thelight of truth ha. departed, and men are disputing and dilagreeiDg.bout the phantom, of their own creating. That Mercy, however,which is (rom everlastin, to everlasting, has caused light to Ihine inthe midst of tbis darkness. The lun of rlghteoGsoess ha" arilen, and,iD a glory that di.peJ, all the .hapelen progeny of a benighted imagi-natioD, rueal. again the heaven-born grace-the charity that savel.The glorious form of doctrinal truth in wbich she no appears to blessthe world, .heds heavenly light into the understandings of men; wbileto the spiritual mind, sbe utters tbingl inefFable to natural thought.Happy, thrice happy church" that, rejoicing in this light, bear. thetruth tbat charity speaks, opens her beart to ber heavenly spbere, andfollows ber into tbe region! of love and purity! Must we dim this cheering seene, bylretuming to look at the infatu-ation that keeps some of our fellow-Christians from following thedirections of trutb, now 10 invitingly, and in luch clearness giveo,eyen wbile they a(knowledge its descent, and are rejoicing in its light 1 Cln they see that it is Goodness which bas come down to address then)in the language of Trutb; can they open their underatandinga to the ioatroctioDs of .ach wisdom, and yet remain with their hearts not IOfteoed into beDe.olen«:e, and with tbeir actions unrectified by ita in- heuce? Can the belief of New.Church truth ever become profaned into • principle of faith alone l CaD cbarity, the life of every atom of ita infinitely varied particulars of doctrine, be palsed by, aDd the.e he reprded and Uled merely 81 a fund of inexbaustible amusement } Ala! What weakness, what wickednesl~ is not the folly of depraved humanity equal to J What does tbe put and present condition of not a few toeieties. formed by the boDd of New-Church faitbl te~tiry? Whate.er purity of doc&rine there may have been to boast of, mUlt we DOt conclude, that faith alone has been too much uled as tbe bond of anion ? The importance of charity 8S the living principle of doc- trine, ad hence the essence of every regulation and action of societyJ . . 80& been luliclently felt. Faith, rather than charity, ha. heen too . . . regardecI u he quaHfication for membership. The disaemina- IiaD of truth, little a. bal been effected therein, bas been more attended .. "hoped in, than the spreading of goodnesl. Forms, bowever DeBIected they baye been, have too much supplied the place of lub- . - ; Jbaa h8ye New-Church Societies exhibited, in many in-
  17. 17. ).( THE INTBLLBCTO.6.L REPOIITORYstance., the spirit of the fallen Church, aDd of coune ha ye shared iDthe dilute" which mark its oyertbrow. Let ibe old leaven be cutout: let the renovating influence of holy Ine or charity be unob-structed in its way through all our institutioos, and into every depart-ment of every association formed: and then, while false dodriDa arebeing broken up and dispersed, the Church of the Lord shall remainleCure. True faith, eDJi.ened by genuine cbarit" Ihall eaaae it toabound in the fruits of rigbteoQlDeaS aDd peace. While the ChristianChurch, in it. fallen condition, is IplitUng itae1f ioto Ihreds by ftliOUIconflicting doctrine., which act upon ita moth-eaten lobltaDce liketeeth of iron pulling in all directioDl; let it be the great el"011 of theNew-Church to give flexibility and strength to ita texture by the pene-trating diffusion of the oil of holy loft; that the tabernacle of Godmay be with men, that He may dwell with them, and be their God,for ever. T. C. FAITH AND LOVE.] N the present age, faith is considered as the all in all of CbrilLiaoity,and love is esteemed oDly &1 the effect of faith J when yet, strictlyapeaking, love i. the originator of faith in the buman mind, and uIUch is entitled to pre-eminence. Mark their difFerenee! ye ahaUknow them by their fruits. . Men profesaiDg faith, being injured, or taking offence at lOIDeimaginary alight, have punned their brethren with implacable batredaDd reaeotment j Dor would they listen to any &enD. of reeoDciHatiOD.But men of 108 overlook innumerable real faalb, ".wrer loag. aodare kind. et Loye canDot bear aeparation from a brother, but pants foramon. Loye Dever pleadl, My fee1iDga, my cbancter, the opinion ofmy friend., &c. &c., bot in ODe generous dort queochea ~yery particleof anger. Love is aI.ay. full of mercy and good fruita, aDd etemaU,forgives. Men professing faith, often misrepresent the actioDl of o&hen, bluttheir reputatioD, attribute motives to them which they Deyer cherished,aDd violently drive them from church-eommunioD aDd the useful o8icat.hey held. But men of loe always put the beat construetioD OD theC:ODduct of their erriog brethren, beiog tender of their charaeter, aDdaappose them to be actuated by more excellent principles &haD are ex-ternally apparenL Men pro£cuing faith baye murdered their feUo,,·crealurea~ baft
  18. 18. AND IfBW JEBUlALBJI II.£.OAZINB. 16ravard their COUDtry, bum their cities.. and .pread desolation andmisery all .roand. But love newI with bonor &bfae gross violation.of hamaniLy: love atretches oot ber band to save, but never to de-stroy, meos liyes. Charity bestows, but never pluDden; fertilizes, butne.er desolatel. Charity. we therefore maintain, is incomparably moreuseful ban either faith, or hope, or both. For, supposing them tobe genuine, tbey are generally confined to the bo.oml where they exist.But love naturally overftows the ,-essel in which it- is contained, and itllarger iD8aeDceI refresh all around. . Unanimity, peace, joy, andhappioes., .re the blessed fruits of charity. Faith, we grant, i. highly eulogized in the Epistle to the Hebrews:bot it is chiefly iD a passiYe seose. We assert tbat love is more ulefulto the world at large thao i. faith. It is more importaDt, that Christian.love ODe another. than that &hey believe all tbe Dlinutie of DivineTruth. Faith, Dolesl guided by, and worked under, the influr.nce ofIoye, will reDder DO lerrice to the community, and should it be workedby bigotry, ignorance, or {alse zeal, .. iD the case of Saul of Tarlus,iL might prove detrimental to true religion and human happiness. Fur-therolore, the world can be no competent judge of our faith, whetherit be IODDd or unsound. The unbelieving seldom examine (except itbe to find faolt) the oracles of truth: they cannot, therefore, under-stand the quality of faith profelsed by the Christian. Being inclinedto evil, they are .ery susceptible of erroneous and unfavourable im-preasioDs. But with respect to our love and charity, the case is widelyditrerent-they can easily judge of this. Anotber line of distinction between faith and love is this :-Thata man under the influence of faith. nlllY be very zealous to persuadeothers to believe as be believes, without ever designing their eternalsalvati9D j whilst a man inftoenced by love, seeks not bis own honouror self.interest, but the holiness and happiness of all arouDd. It is notAO much his intention to bring all to believe exactly as he believes, al te10ft tile Lord· bit God supremely and his neighbour affectionately: {orthoagh, in articles of minor importance, tbey differ, still they rejoice,that where love is he predominant principle there is a fair prospect oflalatioD and eternal felicity. Love or charily is a gnee 10 excellentand so uD~xceptionable, that there have been DO controversies in wbatmanner we ought to love one another, or whetber we ought or oughtDot to cultiYate tbe principle of love for our fellow-creatures: but with r~gard to faith the case il quite the reverse; on this subject thecontro.enies have been unsatisfactory and endless. PinaUy, That man mua" haTe a stupid, thol1ghtlels, uofeeling heaRI
  19. 19. 16 THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORYwho i. not in8amed by the display of 10Ye, when it appears arrayedin heavenly beauty aDd limplicity. The heathens were Dot la muchstruck with thefaUh of lhe early Christians .. with their lot1e: Cl Seebow these Christian I love one another." Looe, like the UA, shedsita genial aDd yital raYI on the moral world j bat Jailh, like the tllOOJI,though ofteD seen, is leldom felt. It never produce. the lame happyeffects on mankiDd, .. the sun. Soon is the loul Itopped in its careerof usefulness, unless it be animated with love. Love gives faith allits life, vigour, and activity. Til love which aDimatel, binds, unites.cementa, and gladdens (aolilies, rendering glory 10 God in the highest,peace on earth, and goodwill to all mankind. Love, diffused lhroughthe earth, would make it resemble heaven; yea, palfadi.e would bereatored. Oh then, ye New-Church Cbristians,leL brotherly love con-thiue! So, shall we at last enter that blealed abode, where die Godof faith and love for eyer reigns al King of kings, and Lord oflords. Cl For ey~r tMre, hi boly ire Shall our aft"ectioDI raiIt-, And ."eetly all our louh conspire To Ihlg Jehovab. praise."Liverpooll Augu,t, l837. R.O.S. AN EXCUnSION THROUGH THE HEART OF SWlfZERLAND, ACCOMPANIBD WITH SPIRITUAL RBFLltC1IOMI. Ix the lummfr of 18~4, 1 made an excursion through one of thOiecentral regionl of Europe, where uature appears to have Uled every effort to dilpmy all the beauty, lublin,ity, and magnificence of her Icenery, and, within a circuit of aboul. five hundred miles. tu as-semble every thing grand and majestic that can be exhibited &0 &henatural eye of man. This excursion il annually made by numerouItravellars, who delight iD contemplating the majestic beauties ofcreatiODI 81 displayed by the Divine Hand in the regions of nature. Onthis excursion, every kind of scenery is exhibited to the eye, from thefruitful plains of Alsace, along the banks of the Rhine, the most beau-fu1 riyer of Europe, through the valleys and glens of Switzerland, tothe lofty Alpl, whose summits are capped with e&erDal InOWI. Themind which has never been rouled leriously to reflect on the objectsaround itl is here compelled to throw off the lethargy which benumbl
  20. 20. AND NEW JERUSA.LEM MAGAZINE. 17 its fram~ and to awake to perception and feeling. Sometimes you wander by the side of a vineyard, where the purple grape tempts the traveller to refresh his parched palate, and, the refreshing foliageinYites bim to recline under its agreeable sbade. In the distance youhear the artless song of simplicity proceeding from maidens, who arepropping the vines that tbey may stand erect under the increasingweigh of their cluaters. The peculiar costume of tbese peasant girls.which varies eyery twenty or thirty miles you travel. and which theybave derived from their remotest ancestors, adds lingular interest cothe scene. No sooner have you arrived at t.he extremity of tbe vine-yard. than a new vista opens to tbe view. You behold piles of rocksapparently hrown on each other in the utmost confusion, as if castby the baDds of the giants, when they endeavoured to besie!e theciddal of heaven: some are piled on ea~h other longitudinally, somevaDsveraely, some obliquely; some stand erect and form lofty clilTs,and some impend and threaten to crush the traveller, if he presume10 pass under them. * Standing in lolemn silence, which is onlybroken by the murmur of rills that trickle from a thousand springs,aDd com biDe their stream,lets at the base of this mountain of rocks iand openiDg every avenue oC your mind to receive the vast im-pression; you behold, I think, one of the most awful and magnificentac:enes. that nature in her calmness can exhibit ;-1 say, in her calm-.ess, because the volcano and the thuDderstorm do not belong to the ~almness of natore. Leaving this mountain of rocks, you behold the deep blue lake,the great reservoir of a thousand streamlets, vhich gush from therocks. Its waters are as transparent as the crystal from which theySpraDg, and are tinged with green or blue according to the nature ofthe atmolphere which presses upon its bosom. On the other side of&he lake, tbe Alpine scenery rises in majesty before you. In the cen·tre of the Swiss Alps is a mountain called Rigi, which is one of thelower peaks of that mighty chain, and whose summit is more easyof access than tbe others. After an ascent of about eight hours,sometimes very steep, and sometimes gently inclining, you arrive atthe summit, where you are expected to spend the night, in order to.itDeu the splendour, of t.be setting and rising sun. Travellers {rainall parts, aDd of all distinctions) here meet together; they hasten tosecure a retreat for the night; two temporary places were erected {ortheir entertainment i I had Lhe good fortune to secure B corner and • Moatier Grand Val, of which this i5 a description) althou«b noL much noticedby tra"ellen, i. certainly one of the ruost sublime scene. of S"itzerlaDd. NO. XLIX.-VOL. V. D
  21. 21. 18 THB INTBLLBOTUAL REPOSITORYa couch. After we had refrelhed ounelyes at ODe common table, aDdbad puled some time in various conyeraatioD, they wbo bad beds.retired to repose. Bat I natures sweet restorer, balmy 8Ieep," had led from my eyes.There is this disadYantage attending pedeatrian excursions <at least, 10far aa my experience has gone), that too great bodilyes.efciae cauaeathe cireulation of the crimson current to be so excited and powerful,that it requirea several hours o( repose before it subside. to ita equili-brium state, when Cl gentle sleep creeps oer the frame, and steepsthe SeD8eS in forgetfulness." Several houn were thus passed insleepless repose, and the magnificent objects which bad lately fixedmy attention DOW engrossed my mind. I communed with my beartupon my bed, and said, Is not tbis magnificent world the basis, andthe ultimate scenery, of the Lord. kingdom 1 Does Dot thia mouu-tain, upon wbose lofty bosom I recline, signify something in thedivine economy which man should know? And do not thole rocks, hicb I have lately contemplated in such anlazement, portray some- thing spiritual to the mind? And do not those waters, which gush in a thousand streamlets from their stony bosoms, as if by the power of seme inYisible wand, impress sonlething etemal on the considerationor man} And does not that lake, whose limpid waters I admired, imply something whicb man, who is destined for immortality, should love to contemplate? Whilst I was thus musing, Bnd the glow of admiration was burning in my soul, the ideas I had lately acquired in studying the writings of the New Jerusalem, viYidly impressed my mind. 1be natural world is a theatre, on which the objects of the Lords kingdom are exhibited in a natural manner, adapted to the natural perceptions of man. How sublime the idea! how calculated to exalt and refine the mind! These magnificent objects, therefore, are 80 may external displays of that Infinite Goodness, Vildom, and Power# from which they were created, and by which they are continually preserved. These views, which 80 admirably develope the purest (orm of Chris- tianity from the Sacred Volume, not only enlightened the rational perception respecting the sublime destinies of man, but shewed the connexion he enjoys wi,th a spiritual world, where the majestic cause. exist of those magnificent objects which surrounded me. The harmo- nies of creation were wonderfully dilplayed to my mind; and as I WIll able to connect natural things with spiritual, they filled it with rapture. It is thul, said I, that the Word of God is in delightful correspondence and harmony wiLh his works. This truth has been dimly diacerDed by every sincere disciple of Revelation, but it remained for Lhe en-
  22. 22. AND NEW J&RUSALBM MAGAZINE. 19iipteDed Swedenborg &0 pomt 01H that correspondence and harlDODy Jaod to explain it in 10 lumiDoul a manDer to the buman mind. It wasthen that I first beheld the true and mOlt edifying meaoiDg of &be stupendous imagery of the volume of Reyelation. Those mighty towering rocks powerfully remioded me of the u . . ",."ioll qfroelu," of ..hich the prophet speaU, when he describes the nature of &hat defence .hieb lurrounds the righteous, aDd which signify thOle eter-.1 tru&ha by which the Lord defends and protects hi. people. Chose lofty mountains brooght to my remembrance that 11 holy mouotam, where the Lord bath commanded his blessing, even life for evermore j •• and which correepoDds to &hose exalted principles of )oye towardaGod, and of charity toward, man, on which t.he human mind shouldever be baled, and by which.ll its motives of action should ever begoyemed. Those limpid waters, which were spread at the foot of themountains like a" sea of glass," yividly impressed OD the dawningspiritual perceptioDs of my mind, those living truths, which are 10 aptlyportrayed by the Ps.loliat, wbeD he lpeaks of the 11 pool of liriogwaters, which shall arile in the desert to reCred! tbe thirsty sool,"and to diffuse life, vigour. and celestial felicity, through the mind ofman. ThOle verdant valley., decked with vineyards and com-fidda,reminded me of the Yalleyl of Ilrael, which " were covered with com,"and which constituted one of the delighLful features of the land ofpromise. Surely" _aid I, &I the glow of meditation was thns burningwithin me, man is cODnected, as a spiritual being, DOt with an idealand empty world, as is commonly supposed, but a world of spiritualand immortal realities, where the righteous and the regenerate willcontemplate" Lhe Rock of ages," It the everlasting bills," "tbe {oun-&aiD of liriog waters ;"":""iD sbort, all that is magnificent, glorious, andgood, that Lbe eye can behold in the regioDs of nature. On &he following morning, I arose from my humble couch, to wit-nea, DO doobt, one of t.be most splendid spectacles that can be display.ed OD the theatre of nature. It W8I the rising of the lun on one ofthe loftiest mountaiDl of Europe. Night. had gradually withdrawnits sable mantle, and Aurora, beautifuJly decked with every hue ofenchantment, WAS aboul to ulher in the King of day, " who came fort.hfrom his chamber rejoicing as a bridegroom,-al a strong man-to rUDhis courle from one end of heaven to the other." llle long chain ofsnow- clad mountaiDs appeared gilded, 8S it were, with bnmilbed gold,and the acene was certainly one of the mOlt ineffable, that the eyeof man could behold OD this aide of heaven. BOl, I exclaimed,8titlpursuing my spiritual reflections, what is this, although so extremely »2
  23. 23. 20 THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORYenchanting, when compared with the rising of the It SUD of righteous-ness" with healing in it.. wings, over the benighted, cold, and dismalstate. of the unregenerate mind! How striking, aud how edifying i.the correspondence! How much does the Word of God, al 8 lun oflight, illuminate every object, and bow does every object, in return,when viewed by R mind enUghtened by genuine ideas respecting theVolume of Truth, reflect tbe light it bas receiyed, and at once confirm tbe divine testimony of truth displayed iD the eternal harmonieswhich must necelsarily exist between the Word and the works of God! The mind, delivered (rom the bondage of prejudice. has an intoitiye perception of these correspondences 8Dd harmonies; but they have never been brought home to its natural contemplation, as a magnificent system of truth,., until the New Jerusalem was aboot to descend out of hea.en, aDd establish its purity, its iDnocence aDd ita l heavenly splendour. amongst men. After having witnessed this magnificent scene, I bent my steps to- wards the valley on tbe other side of the mountain; when, behold! one of the most awful and terrific sights that nature can exhibit, was displayed before me. I t waR the ruins of the mountain called RaSI- berg, which, in ) 806, suddenly fell, and in a monlent overwhelmed many villages, together with their inhabitants, filled up 1he greater portion of aD extensive lake, and in an instant preseoted a prospect, which, at tbe tint glance, filled the mind of the beholder with Rnguish and tenor. The fathers of the village were employed in their respec- tive occupations, some followingtbe plougb, some pruning the vines, and others tending their flocks; and the busy hoosenves· at their do- mestic duties; and the playful children, aDd the sires with Cl staff in hand for very age; . all-all were overwhelmed with destruction in a moment by the catastrophe, the tremendous effects of which were now exhibited before me. At first it appeared difficult to connect &his awful catastrophe with spiritual causes; but the Vord of God, which is tbe sole discoverer of spiritual causes, powerfully remioded me of the mountains that should be Cl cast into the midst of the aea," " of the mountains that sbould depart, and of the hills ,hat should be re- moved," &c., and thus I saw a striking image of that awful judgment, which is executed on a perverted church, when all the heavenly prin- ciples that should constitute ill life and spirit are extinguished by tbe prevalence of evil and error. Rocks were burIed to a prodigious dis- tance, and by the fall shattered into fragments. These fragments lay just as they bad {allP-D, in the utmost confusion, and exhibited to the contemplative mind a scene of dismay and terror. Oh! I exclaimed,
  24. 24. AND NBW JRRDSALBM MAGAZINE. 21how eould the DiYine Benevolence and Wisdom-bow could He who" weighs tlle mountains iD scales, and the hill, in a balance, tt suffer 10many mortal. to be precipitated into eternity by so dreadful a coDvul-lion of nature! But the views of providence, and of the wile laws bywhich its operations are conducted, which 1 had lately acquired instudying the invaluable writings of the New Dispensation, banishedall doubt and every murmuring emotion from my mind. For, by thoseenlightened views of the operations of a wonderful providence, all theworks of God are justified &0 man. 1his world, with all itl magni-ficent furniture, has been created for no other purpose thpn that offorming a Yast seminary, in which the families of the human race mAybe trained for heaven. Our heavenly Father, who, as the Divine Hus-bandman, cultivates this vut seminary, U before whom there is nothinggreat, there is nothing small;" Dlust have an especial eye to the re-moval of Blan from tbillower world) to that higher world" where all theexalted ends for which he has been created are accomplished. 1"hoaemortals, therefore, the victims of this awful catastrophe, who were insome states of regeneration, were remoyed (ram the earthly scene oftheir existence to that spiritual world, at the moment when theirstates of immortal life could be receptive oC the greatest measure ofgoodness and happiness, denoted by the "good measure, presseddown, shaken together, and running oyer." And those, OD the COD-trary, who were not so happily constituted as to have heayen formedand established within them, could be checked in their insane careerof folly, and prevented {ram sinking into greater depths of iDiquityeBd consequent misery. Oh! said I, whilst the emotioDI of my mindwere almost overpowering, where is the protection, where is the safety of man 1 la it in the valleys} They may be inundated by the torrents, or overwhelmed by the fall of the mountains. I1 it on Lhe rocks ~ Ob, no! the awful scene before me plainly proves tbat they are Dot to be trusted. Is it on the mountains? An astoDisbing proof is here displayed that they are not the proper security of man. Doel tbis security and happiness consist in wealth? This is atiIJ more de- Yoid of stability than the majestic rains of nature here exhibited to "ew. Does it arise from health and ~igour of body? This, as ex- perience often sbews, is more unstable and insecure than aoy. Where, then, are happiness and security to be found? rrhe saDle delightful Yie•• plainly demoDltrate, that these most desirable attainments caD only arise from the heaYenly harmonies which cbaracterize the regene· rate mind. He that bas the kingdom of heaven within him has no cause to fear, " though the mountains depart and the bills be removed."
  25. 25. 22 TUB INTELLEOTUAL RBPOSITORY Wendiog my way amidlt tbese ruml of the mODDtains, I came to a desolate place, whicb, but a few years since, had been a ftouriahing city. The ravagel of war-during the FreDch revolution had laid ita principal buildings in uhes, and nearly emptied it of its inhabilaDt&. I looked, and there was scarcely a man to behold! A Dew scene of devaatation and horror was presented, which I contemplated with feel- ing. entirely different from those with which I had lately beheld the ruins of nature. Tbese were the rums oC man! The peaceful home. under whose roof many souls had been trained for heaven, W8S ruined aDd desolate; there were no Cl boys and girls playing in &he streets:·· " the voice of mirth. and the voice of g)adne., the voice Qf the bride- groom, and the voice of the bride had ceased:" tI thorns had come up in her palaces, nettles and brambles in the fortresses thereof:· The demon of conquest had plundered every habitation, and tile aacrilegioul hand of the enemy bad spared neither the temples of religioD, nor the altars of piety. Of scenes similar to this we often read in the Sacred Volume j aDd the doctrines of the New Jerusalem clearly unfold the spiritual reality of such scenery. A city, I remembered" corresponds to doctrine. This idea, at first, disturbs the mode by which the natur~l mind has been accustomed to &hink.: to the merely natural perceptions it appears remote and fanciful. But bow striking is the correspondence when man becomes acquainted with himself, aDd with the mode of bis .piritual existence! God is represented as dwellingin 8 magnificent city-the New Jerusalem j but God dwelleLb not in ~houles made with hands:·· it is, therefore, not literally intended jand where can he dwell, but in the truths derived from his holy Word, properly understood, and arranged in heaYenlyorder in the mind lTbis it properly the CivittU Dei, the City of God, as Augustine call.it, in which he dwells amougst men. The wise .ncien.... whose mind.were more open to spiritual perception. thao the modem generatioDsof mankind. frequently represented, under the form of a celestial cit.y,that Iystem of doctrine which should inltruct Rnd confirm the minds ofmen ill the principles of immortal liCe aDd happiness. Thus Plato, *iD the sixth book of his Republic, builds a philosophical city J and,what i. remarkable, hi ,"U it he IIJme dimeruioll a, thwlI recorded ofthe heavenly citg in the Apocalgp.e" and says, moreover, that it is con-lee rated by he correlponMnc, which QutI bel.een .eaven and eart".It is (rom thi. cause that the prophet calls it a U (I cUy of truth." Theruins, therefore, of the desolate city which I was then contemplating,occasioned lerious reflections, when viewed in cODnection with spiritual • See Riclaer. Work, yul. 3, p. 112.
  26. 26. AMD NBW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE.realities. It wal R mOlt ItnKing emblem of a mind devastated by thehostile powen of e"iI and falsity. Its walls and ramparts being de-stroyed aDd Cl laid on heaps," yiyidly portrayed the danger in wbichman is, when the divine commandmentl, in their literal lenle, as thebalwark of safety to the loul, Rre transgresled and broken. If thelemighty w.l1s of spiritual defence are once broken through, Oh ! whereis the safety of the interior principles and graces which constituteheafen in Lhe soul} They will as certainJy perish, as lambs whenexposed to the famishing wolf. 0 my loul! II if thou wouldst enterinto life, keep the commandments: I was here reminded of thatbeautiful pallage in the Psalms, where, as one of the diYine blessingsenjoyed by tbe church, it is stated, I f There shall be no breaking in,and going out;" that i&, there sball be no breach made in the wallsof the city by a bostile power, nor any military expedition out of it to repel the inyuion of the enemy; well, therefore, may it be said in the following yerle: _"~ Happy are tbe people who are iD such a state...• Thrice happy they, whose spiritual enemies are subdued under their feet I Leaving these melancholy remains of the deyastations of men, 1again turned my eyea towards the sublime scenery around me. The way from Altorf, tbe ruined city I have just described, to the Mount St. Gothard, conducts the trayeller through one of the wildest, and mOlt romantic regions of Switzerland. This mountain is an object of great attraction to the stranger. It is celebrated as the source of the Rhine i and ita beds of crystal, which is here .found in ita mOl& van.parent state, together with many curious and ornamental stones, offer great inducements to the traveller to come aDd behold ita grand ad magnificent scenery; and aD are amply repaid (or the labour aDd expense of tbeir ,isit. This mountain is mucb Joftier than the Rigi I haye already described, and its lummit, although Dot fery di11icoJt of accelS, is leldom reached by the traveJler. This arises from the necessity of haying guides, the expense 01 whose service il con- siderable, as well as from the necessity of remaini.g one night under die canopy of beuen. As you ascend, the surrounding biJls gradually aabside into a plain, and tbe vista by degrees opens into a boundless plOlpecL Cities and villages, valleys and lakes, become more numer- ous at efery step you advance, until the eye (bow wonderful the fact) takes in, at a glance, an iOlmensity of objects. If He that plRnted the eye,.baU he not see!" If the natural eye can grasp 10 great an expanse, • Psalm cxli".
  27. 27. 24 THE INTELLECTUAL REPOSITORY and distinctly discern 10 great a yariety of objects, wha~ must be the vision of the spiritual eye, when adapted by regeneration to contem- plate the scenery of beaven! The thoughts of the angels, says Swe- denborg, are ex.tended into the societies of heaven in every direction.,. and the more exalted the intelligence, the greater the exteDsioD, and the more exquisitely delightful the perception and sensation of celestial bliss. Surely, I exclaimed, it is not one of the least of the divine mercies vouchsafed to t.he New Jerusalem, to be able to connect, by corres- pondences, the scenery of earth with the scenery of heaven! How many ages have mankind been shrouded with darkness respecting the true nature, state, and scenery of heaven! But, sing aloud, all ye nations, and rejoice! for" the covering cast over all people, and the vail spread over all nations," respecting these momentous subjects. are now destroyed. The higher I ascend this majestic mountain, the more extended and deli~htful is the prospect; in like manner, the higher I ascend the celestial mountain of love towards the LORD and of charity towards man, tbe more extended and delightful will be the magnificent landscapes of heaven. What a~e angels, but - " mtD in lichttr habit clad, • High o·er cttJestial mountaiDs wingttd in Sigbt." Had I been one of the favoured sons of the Muses-bad I possessed the genius of a Cowper or a ByroD, my soul must instantly have ig- nited, and glowed with poetic raptures at the prospect before me, combined with spiritual reflections arising from the study of the writings of the herald oftbe New Dispensation. Our natural concep- tions are seldom in agreement with facts, until rectified by principles based on experience, and OD the acquisition of superior knowledge. Tbu~ although the mngni6cent Rhine, is traced to the Gothard, yet no one sees its source in agreement with his natural conception. He looks, and he beholds no specific spot where the river arises; but a thousand rills and streamlets spring from every part of its lofty bosom, and, Rccording to the laws of gravity, descend to the )ovest plRDe, where they combine their waters, aDd thus constitute the begin- nings of the mighty Rhine. The spiritual reflections which arise in the mind in tracing this magnificent river to the ocean-a river vhicb, in its course" and by its navigation, serves to fertilize and enrich manv countries, are extremely numerous, and full of edification. We ar~ reminded of that" river, the streams whereof Dlake glad the city of God j " and the reSecting mind is enabled to trace the correspondeD~e between that fruitful intelligence, which fructifies the soul with every
  28. 28. AND NSW JERUSALEM MAGAZINB. 25 species of goodness and virlue, and a majestic rifer which fertilizel cbe meadows and plain., and bears bealth, wealtb, and prosperiLy into kiDgdoma aDd cities. Time and space, however, do not permit me at present 0 elucidatethis correspondence by Bny further reftectionl, nor can I deacribe theImlery of Lbe Shrekhom, near the Iuulmit of which I happened to bewhen a thunderatorm wu terrifyiDg the inbabitants in the valley be-low. The pbenomena were certainly mOlt astonishing. It only re-mains, that" from contemplating these majestic spectacles, I considermyself in tbe vast system of creation, and, although an object of divinemercy, am nothing but ~n ApBx.THE CIRCULATION OF fHE NEW-CHURCH DEFINITION OF CHARITY. To the Editor, of the Intellectual Repoliory, etc. GaNTLE)lEN,Soli. years since I travelled {roln Norwich in company with themuch-respected merrlber for that city, the late Villiam Smith, Esq.,wben the conversation took a serious turn i and amongst other N ew-Church ideas which I presented to him, was our definition of charity.I had previously requested bis own definition of that term, which beaccordingly defined to mean, pity for the distrelt: I replied that I (Idid Dot think hi. definition 8Ufficien~ly extensive i and, further, thatamce charity aim even in heaTen, where distress enters not, it musthaTe a more extensive meaning. I then luggested tllat charity im-plied, " he love of goodness in God, and thence the love of doinggood i" and after a little consideration he candidly adopted my defi-Dition. I need not lay bow universally the pro{eaaing Christian cburchin our day is ignorant of the true meaning of the term charity J and,perbap.~ efen amoDgst those who are caned New-Church men, thereare lOIDe whose idea is too limited, and not quite in agreement viththat of E. S., inasmuch 81 charity is resolved by tbem into a sort ofnatural hamanity or persoDally kind feeling. This is Dot to be won-dered at, conlidering the strength of the iDftoencea of education andexample. Being accustomed to deplore tbis general ignorance of thetrue Dature of charity, I was comforted and gratified on finding in tbeU Diaertation on Ethical Philolophg," by the late Sir J ames MaciDtolh,lhe following moat perfect definition: U CharittJI among the ancientdimes corresponded with Bc" of the Platonists, and witb the 4>,Aua KO. XLIX. VOL. T. E
  29. 29. THE INTELLBCTUAL REPOSITOayof later philosophen, .. compreheoding die lotIe of all ,A. illoDe-worh" ill tu Cr.uw or hiI cretJl1nes. It is the thologiaJl rirtoe ofc1uJrU" and corresponds with DO term in ase among modem moralists."(note G p. 409). By &be way, I CUlIlot conceive 8 more profitable exercise, in addi- tion to that of reading together the writings of E. S., &ban the reading aDd dilcauiDg of Sir J am~ Macintoshl admirable dissertation. Itwould pre·emiDently tend to streugtben the conviction of the supremeexcellence of &bemonl principles of E. S., by aJrording an opportunity.of coDtrastiDg wdb them the errors of &be varioDS moral systems which ba•• been pot forth by all the eminent moral writers. It would also exercise the mind in a kind of analysis well calculated to improve thejudgment iD "OTal and practical concerns j and by informing the con-aci~, by means of jost and close discriminationa, it would have atendency to facilitate the descent of the interior spiritual affections, andto enlarge the Iphere of their IICti vity• and likewise to direct themiDto the bestdlaDnela. W. M. CONFUSION OF IDEAS IN SPEAKING OF THE DEAD. To th, Editor, of the Intelkctual RepOIiory, efc. GBJfTL.IIBNI) BAVB noticed the general tendency of all Christians, except thOle<>f the New Church, to spmk of the tkad body as the man himself:while ,the New Church universally speaks of the ,tilllioing oul u theman himself. But when the former penons are talking with refer-ence to a future conscious state of existence, they will sometimesspeak like New-Church men i and sometimes their ideas are so con-fused, that at one moment the soul, and at the next, the body, is spokenof as the individual man. Mr. Wesley, in his 4Jst hymn, presents asingular illustration of this confusion and alternation of ideas; and,with your permission, I will cite it, marking where the body or tbelOul is implied : - And am I bom to die ? To lay tbi. body down? ADd most IDJ tftmblinc Ipirit ftJ Vato. world uaknoWD A laad of deepest ehade, Uflpi~rc~d by A"",aR tAolIgAI! The dreary ~giODS of the dtad, [WA,r~ lit. li"i"G .pint lUll flOIfll] Wlt~rt alltAi.,. arltorlot !
  30. 30. AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE. BOOJl tU from tartb 1 [tie ",frit) 10, What will b..come of." E~ma1 happinell or "oe Mu.--t TR.N "" portion bf : Waked 6!1 tAt t,,,mptt. ,ownd 1 [the hod!l DOW] from my BTart "hall ri.~, And ee the Judge with glorJ crowDd t And It. the flamiog Ikies! How sball ll~a"e "y tomb, Vitb triumph or regret? A rearful, or a joyfnl doom, A cune, or bleuiDg meet? Will sacel·band, COQ,,~y 1beir brother [the 6011,1] to the bar? Or devil. drag "y ,oul aw.y To meet ita sentence there 1 Now let us endeaour to ascertain the meaniDg of the above "tJIfpopular compotiio1J, so popular, indeed, that numerous tunes havebeen expressly composed for it. Let us take i~ 8ccoroiDg to itIgrammatical construction, and we shall lee how guiltless ..hoae whoeontinoally ling it with devout admiration must be, of attaching any- tbing like a coherent meaning to it. It appear., then, (rom t.he.. words, a re8ectiDI reader of them may exclaim, tbat-I shan lay mybody down at death, and my spirit will ft y into an tlnknOtDR land of deepeat abade, wbich land, howeyer, is well knotD1I 8S con.isting of heaven-of which " shade," cannot be predicated-and of heD. M 1 spirit, and that, whet.her it be good or bad, will fiDd thU land, and eYeD that part of it called heaveR, to be the dreary regions of the dead, or o( departed spirits which are there alive, and where all things areforgo j and, consequently, even in heaven there must be an entire oblitJiun of all past mercies; and in hell, of all past .ins! What the apirit is to be conscious of, after forgetting aJl its (ormer con8ciousnesl,both of its affections and perceptions; all its religious knowledge,faith, and convictions; all ils joys and woes, does not appear; but,undoubtedJy, I, that is, my spirit, 11 as soon a." I depart, shall findrUrnal happinu. or woe, in the dreary regio7ll where all things arefergot. "1, (that is my ,old) from my grave shall rise," " waked bythe trumpet, sound," that is, "soon as (roDI earth I go:" [Here is astrange confusion of periods; and 1, means first the spirit, aDd then 1,changes to the body j but this shifting I1 only known from the con.ut; the grammatical sense aaln-I. that the piT;t, immediately on itsquittiDg the body, will be waked by the trumpets sound, (which .2
  31. 31. THE INTELLECTUAL REP091TOllY trumpet, however, is DOt to lound, perhaps, for ages after,) and Ihm will see the world in ftames.] 1 shaD leaye my tomb with triurr.. ph or regret i-but whence either emotion 1 If as aoeD 8S "my spirit" de- parted it triumphed in Cl eternal happiness," and met I f a joyful doom," or .. felt regret" in" eternal woe," how caD either the regret, or the triumph, be renewed) Can he, who, twenty years siDce, triumphed on finding, or regretted on losing. R treAsure, renew the fulness of triumph or regret as if he had never triumphed before l Angel-bands are to canyer ,. their brother" to the bar (if righteous), but does tI their brother" mean the lOul or the body ? How can that which was in the tomb be the brother of aDgels? It would seem to be the body, according to what precedes, but the oul from what follows; for deoill are to drag It lily ,oul~" (if wicked it is presumed) from hen to I f the bar" in heaven ( ! ! !) If to meet it, ,enlence TREKB; " that is, not antecedent to its punishment, but after having endured agel of woe in hell, it is to be brought to the bar, that is, of COfIr,e, in order to see if its former "doomu was jUlt or not. How aDxious muat one of these spirits feel on being dragged up by the denls to be tried; perhaps some hope may spring up that hi~ Judge may convict his crueljailors of false imprisonment! If this be not possible, why pal oyer again a sentence on II the loul," which must have been passed ages before, when its punishment begao} immediately after death} And angels are to conduct the ,oull with" whom they haTe enjoyed sweet companionship in realms of bliss, to the bar to be tried-tried !{or what purpose} What other idea can be suggested but that t.heir trial is to settle whether they are to have their former sentence to hap-piness confirmed or reversed? If so, what an anxious time it mUlt befor both the angels and their brethren whom they are conducting tothe bar! And if so, tbere is Dot much room for a feeling of triumphuntil the neaD trial is ooer. But if it i. the ,oull of the good, 88 weD8S the soula of the wicked, which are to be hen tried, what can bemeant by It How shall11eave my tomb?" Will the angels conduct" Aar brother" into a tomb before they condllct him to tbe bar? Oris it meant that the angel- bands will convey tbe righteous boditl tothe bar. while devils drag the wicked 80ulI? At any rate, it i. notclear how the phrase. Cl my tom~t caD be fitted to the phrase "my Itloul," supposing" my soul" to be wicked, unless t.he devils put tbewicked 1001s into the tombs once tenanted by their fanner bodies,btJore they drag them to the bar. Good Bishop Hebers mind was in a similar state of confusion wbeDhe penned the following linea U OD the death of a Christian :-"
  32. 32. AND N2W JZaUSALBM MAGAZINB. " no. art cone to tbe graN, ueI its lDuaIoo forsaking. Perhaps tA, tried .pirit iD fear lioprd loo, ; But tbtt iuDlbioc of beaveD beamd bright oa tAg wakiag, And tbe .oUDd wbich tlaou b9rd.t was tbe seraphim. IODg. TA~ art gone to the g,a~, but we will not deplore tlatt, Whose God was tAg ranlOm, tAg cuardian, and guide: He gaye tbee, aDd took thee, and he will restore tAH, ADd death hu DO sting, for the Saviour hath died." The Bishop informs us, hereby, in plain prose, tha.t" the sunshine of beayen beamed bright on the waking" of that wbich, being for- saken by its spirit, was It gone to the grave;" and which, on awaking, heard Lhe serapbiolS song: also that God WRS the ran,om and guar- dian, aDd guide, of this Christians body-of that which i. ,. gone to the grave;" and tben, forgetting the waking, seeing, and bearing, in heaDen, already attributed to thRt which is It gone to tbe grave," the Bishop adds, le He took thee,"-took thee! Where? To the grave? tI and he fDill re,tore thee," that i. (rom the grave to-to where? Why, to tbe world, or the term restore bas .DO proper Dleaning. Really, such strange things fill one with WONDER!ON THE TRIALS ATfENDANT UPON fHOSE WHO FILL PUBLIC STATIONS. WIT• .ur ATTBIIPT TO S.&W TBB CAUl. or TIIEla PsaMIISION.r JUT this life is 8 state of trial is 10 obvious, that tbe observation is trite eYen with the mOlt heedless. But the trials mostly regarded, and which usually furnish subject {or complaint and condolence, are &bose which a-eet Lhe sensual part of our nature only; thus, for in-1taDee, the 10ls of tbe means by which we gratified our external incli-.&ioDl. is dwelt upon at a length, and with a pathos, worthy of abetter theme; and be who can cheerfully submit to privations of thischaracter, is, not unfrequently J lauded RS the purest and most exaltedof ChrisLians. Now, while it must be admitted that this state of re-signation to the coorle of external circumstances, may be regarded,eyeo by the Christian, as one of DO mean attainment, ye~ it is far, veryfar, below wbat the Christian dispensation is cRpable of producing.Besides, the man of a truly noble and expanded mind, who lives morefor olbers than for bimeelf, invests worldly possessions with a verysubordinate value, and by bim their privation is, consequently, felt butsligbtly_ Again; when honours which he canno~ but sce be is him-self entitled to, arc showered on the undeserving instead, this affects
  33. 33. 30 THE INTELLEOTUAL REPOIITORY him but little, because his heart is let upon thing. of an intrinsically higher quality. To admire then the fortitude, aDd to praise the pa- tience, of such an individual, in such circumstances, is, evidently, to admire and to praise that which does not exist. Surely he cannot be said to display Cortitude, who has to encounter that whicb, to him, presents DO Cormidable aspect; nor can bis patience be much exer- cised who experiences DO disappointment which is calculated to escite, in bim, feelings of irritability. These and siolilar trials can afect him but slightly. But when engaging ItrenuouRly and disinterestedly in the promotion of the good of bis neighbour, aa this is included in t.be welfare of the comlQlnity of which he is 8 member, or of tbe country which he calls his own, he meeta wiLh that blighting cold-heartedness which shrinks from co-operation where penonal interest finds DO promise of advancement; or when, after baving carried on his bene- volent plans for a time, he experiences desertion from tbose on wbom, in the hour of need, he relied (or support; tbese are, indeed, trials which explore the inner recesses of his .heart: for, living for other., he feels Dot 80 much for himself-be feels not OD account of his bli~hted hopel alone,-but most {or. those vbo bave thus turned re- creant to the best of caules,-that of genuine, universal charity. If when thus beset, ve see him patient; if when thus heavily laden, we behold him bearing up with fortitude against the incumbent and almost crushing weight j and perseveriogly and cheerfully performing his public duties, Rnd endeavouring, by an increase of activity, to-IUp- ply the deficiency occasioned by the defection he has experienced j - tllen do we behold a man whose example is worth considering, and of whom each may apply to himself the injunction of, I f Go, GIld do thou liktlDile., I t is strange, but yet it is too certainly true, that mankind, in the oggregRte, are basely ungrateful. The page. of the historian eshibit this lamentable fact in the records of every nation, both ancient and modem j and the student of biography will find the obaenaiion fullyverified in t.be account of al010st every individual who ha. adomed theage he lived in, and been the publie benefactor of his speciea. I i.true, that postclity usually does justice to the injured party, by restor-iDg his name to honourable distinction, and by covering the memoryof his persecutors with contempt and execration; while, nevertheJea.,(so inconsistent a creature is maD!) the fery age which is thus ren-dering justice to its ancestry, practises the same specie. of injnatieetowards its contemporaries. To trace such anomalous conduct to itl origin would probably beextremely difficult; aDd, if accomplished, would, perhaps, tend tUJ;" ~
  34. 34. AND NBW JERUI.ALKM MAGAZINB, 31 &0 the gratification of coriolity than to the production of any bCDeficialresults. Bot to examine lhe ques&ion, Why doe_ a just Providencepermit such a state of things to exist l may, possibly, be attendedwith some benefit. . Why is eril permitted to exist a~ all 1 Because the commission ofeYi) cannot be prevented, except by an arbitrary interference of power,wbich would destroy the liberty of maD, and thu. would r~der himan irrespoolible agent; and this would of necessity reducehim" in this,re5pect, to A leye) wiLh the brutes j or, in other words; would destroyhim as a mao.- But it most not, hence, be supposed, that evil is allowed to revel andriot uncoDtrolled. All evil is under the super,ision ,of a univeraaJJeRr-watchful ProYidence" one of whose lavs is, to prelen~ the greaterml from becoming active, by allowing the lesser to come into openmanifestatioa. From a knowledge of this permissive law of the Di-YiDe Ptoridence, it it prelumed, tbe present subject may be elQcid~etthu :-U of aDy ODe it caD, with certainty, be pronounced, that be, ispreparing, wlWe liviDg in this lower world, tor 8 high staLion jn ~kingdom of heaveD"; this may be ..aid of the man who fulfils. arduous.public duties from a principle of love to his neighbour. It may readily:be seeu. tbeD, that that which should tend to alloy the golden moLivesfrom which loch an indi,idual acts, and which thus would operate todim his eternal glory, would also interfere with, and prove prejudicial to. lhe delign of the Creator,-that of the formation of a heaven from th~ human race. Now, if honours, riehes, and tbe,applause,o,f his CeUow- ci&izeDs~ uniformly a~tended and rendered bJilliant the career of the palriotic~ would Dot the purity of their motives be in danger of being III1Iied by die admixture of selfish notions of meriting all these by their works l And would not weak, frail, human nature, be scarcely, if at all, able to withstand the supervention of a state, in which the doing of good for the aake of worldly reward would be blended w itb that of doing good for ita own sake} And, most probably, the former would ultimately be substituted for the latter. To prevent this direful GOIII11IDmaaOD, the Divine Providence more eapecially permit. the triaIa iD question to overtake those who expend their energies in the promotion of the public good j and tbUI, by a wise and mercifuJ, though. to the subject, painful dispensation, the persecutions of their edftnaries are made instrumental in securing to the good an eternal aOWD in beaveD. 1Hc. 2~ ) 837. EDOAa. • D. P. D. 75 et seq.
  35. 35. 32 TtlB INTELLEOTUAL REPOSITORY ON THE DUTY OF PROMOTING THE CONVERSION OF THE DEIST: VITB AN ATTBUPT TO EVINCE, PROM REASON, TSAT GOD I1 IN A HUMAN FORII. EVERY obseryer of the state of society must have become conviaced of the fact, that a large portion of the present community consists of persons who reject altogether a belief in Revelation ;-who are, in. reality, Deists. This class of penons has been greatly augmented, of late, by the diffusion of natural science aDd general knowledge. Not that any scientific truth, or any portion of real knowledge, can possibly invalidate the truth of the Word of· God; or that &D uninformed mind is the most favourable to the germination of the seeds of genuine religious truth; .ince Lhere exists not a more certain truth than this, tbat Gods Word Dnd hi. works nlust be in perfect harmony: but the of enlightenment of tbe mind, in consequence this accession of natural knowledge, has so stimulated the reasoning powers, that implicit belief, in the absence of rational conviction, i. becoming every day Jess general, and men now call aloud Cor rational proofs of the creed propounded {or their acceptance. Finding, however, their teachen unable to furnish the required proof., they not only throw aside, aa worthless, the unsubstantiated dogmas themselves, but hastily reject their reputed source, the Bible, also. That thejustice of luch conduct il questionable, cannot be doubted, wben it is considered, that, in fairness, ~he Scriptures should be ex- amined previous to their condemnation, to ascertain whether they do teach the doctrines ascribed to them or not. Bot in extenuation of this conduct, it may be admitted, as not at all surprising, that, having been taught (rom their infancy that such absurdities are the legitimate offspring of the Bible, these parties should never have thought of questianiDg he trutb of this, bot have taken for granted that their teachers are right here, although they have discovered them to be wrong elsewhere. Nevertheless, there have been individuals whOle piety has induced them to enter upon this yery proper inquiry, and .ho, having thus in sincerity obeyed the command, It Search the Scriptures," have experienced that these amply fe testify" of Him who is the source of all true understanding, and who, having thus been fint led to recognise Him who is If the light," have been enabled t.o draw thence other genuine doctrines also, which have further as. sisted them in their future investigations.
  36. 36. AND NEW JERUSALEM MAGAZINE. 33 Troly, then, it may be said" that we iee numbers of our brethren, who, in Seeing from the error. of man, baye unwittiDgly rejected the counsel of God. Can we forbear pitying such? And ought we not to Ihow the sincerity of our commiseration; by the earnestness of our endeavours to rescue them Crom t.bis awful state of darkness l Nay, are Dot the members of the New Church peculiarly called, as to a positive duty, lo the performance of this work, in t.he command, "Freely ye have received, freely give r For, assuredly, no dispensationhas e,er received, in luch fulnes., the graces which constitute a church, u &he crOWD of all churches, the New Jerusalem. The truths ofthis dispensat.ion, only, are able to cope with every deiatical objec-tion. For. although t.he triperaonal doctrines are as much opposed tothe troth of Revelation as they are to the perceptions of reUOD, yetsome isolated passages of Scripture, when misinterpreted, appear to.pport them. But, 10 obvious is their opposition to every ray ofratioDalligbl" that they become utterly untenable when attacked by areasoning opponent. Not so, the doctrines oC the New Jerusalem.For these, wbile they find in the Holy Word their great power andtheir lore defence, harmonize so perfec~ly with the deductioDs of rea-IOU, that, to all adversaries alike, they present an invulnerable front,and furnish weapons of defence adapted to every species of argumen-tatiye warfare. Like the sword of the cherubim, Cl they turn et1ery way: As an illustration of the above remarks, allow me to present thefollowing attempt at a demonstration, from reason alone, of the propo-sition, ,1uJf God it in a Human Form. The notion which Deists entertain respecting the Creator, i. that ofan Omniscient, Omnipreseot, and Omnipotent Mind, which is ex·"tended through all extent, without body J and without form. Whicb, then, is the best mode of proceeding, for the purpose ofinducingracb perIODS to giye admission to the doctrines of the New Jerusalem i To this question it may be difficult to reply. Probably there existsDO best way. Different minds will require different treatment, andthe judgment of the inseminator of the heavenly doct.rines will be ex-ercised, as the peculiar circumstances of the case may seem to require,to determine the precise mode which he shall adopt. Yet, as therecan be no genuine religion where there exists, interiorly, a denial 01&he truth, that God ezi,ts in a Human Form, * I would suggest thatan acknowledgnlent of this fundamental truth should be obtained, pre-lions to attempting be establishment of the other great truths of Cbris-danity. For that miod which is receptive of the truth, That God i6 • D. L.. aDd W., Nos. 11, 12, and 13. NO. XLIX.-VOL. v. F
  37. 37. 34 THB INTBLLECTUAL R.EPOSITORY a Dimne Man, is in possession of a foundation upon wb~ch the altar of the True God can be raised, Rnd eyentually tbe superstructure of His Temple erected. But, Can this acknowledgment be obtained? From 8 mind that is seeking the truth for the truths sake, I aID of opinion that it cnD; and the object of this paper is to sbew, what ap- pears to me, R probable way of obtaining it. Before proeeeding to our immediate subject, I may be allowed to premise, that as the Deist does not admit the authority of the Scrip- tures, I shall attempt the attainment of my object by means of argu- ments which Rre drawn from reason alone. For, although the Deist turns a deaf ear to the sons of Israel (lruthl derived from a spiritual origin), the militant New Church will not thus be bafBed, sbe having at her command the armies of Assyria (the innumerable confirmations of her doctrines contributed by reason). All who believe in, and acknowledge, the existence of a Creator, will admit that he is something. Now it is evident, that that which is something must exist in a form j since that which bas no form, is no-thing. If, 8S I have experienced, this is attempted to be met with the remark, that there are many things of whose exi8tence we are cognisant, but of whicb we have no idea of form; such, for instance, BS light: it may be replied, that until we have arrived at a positiye knowledge of what light is, we cannot assert that it has DO form. Indeed, the theories ol light, let either be admitted, shew Lhe contrary. The corpuscular, which assumes that light consists of indefinitely mi- Dute particles, in speaking of particles, speaktJ of form, and the (orms, too, according to the theory, of which light consistl. And the undu- latory theory, which supposes light to consist of the undulations of imponderable matter, assumes its form to be that of waves. But it is objected, that Omnipresence is destroyed by ascribing form to God, for form must have an outline, and an outline limits. I admit that an outline does limit (J IUb,tance, but not a property; and Omni- preAence is a property. Omnipresence is nClt God; it is an attribute of God. The outline, then, that is said to limit the form, will not atall interfere with the properties which inhere in that form. Such is a sample of the arguments employed by the deist, in his at-tempts to overturn the rationally obvious truth, that God exists in afornl j and with which he endeavours to est.blish the palpable ab-surdity, that he who gafJe fonn to every thing, has no form him,el!!Sorely the mind that is seeking the truth in sincerity, must see, eyen(rom the few considerations that have now been offered, the falla-eiousness 01 such reasoning j aod, it is presumed, will be prepared toadmit the truth of our present proposition, That Ood is ill aform.

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