Swedenborg emanuel-charity-a-translation-of-de-charitate-1766-the-swedenborg-society-london-1947
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Emanuel Swedenborg

Emanuel Swedenborg

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    Swedenborg emanuel-charity-a-translation-of-de-charitate-1766-the-swedenborg-society-london-1947 Swedenborg emanuel-charity-a-translation-of-de-charitate-1766-the-swedenborg-society-london-1947 Document Transcript

    • "Charitymo/ be likened to a fi ame " Z(/ El This small book containsa simple key to the NewSociety which the worlddemands. It shows that "Charity"is not merely the giving ofalms, but is that outlookand life which bind mentogether in a common pur­pose, destroying hatred andself-seeking. This work cannot fail toimpress the reader with itsmessage of hope. It is achallenge to thinking menand women to take theirpart in bringing a true andlasting peace among us.Price 3s.
    • CHARITY A Translation cif the MS. "De Charitate" By EMANUEL SWEDENBORGTHE SWEDENBORG SOCIETY (Inc.) Bloomsbury Way, London, W.C. 1 1947
    • CHARITY EDITORIAL NOTETHIS work on " Charity " was left by Swedenborgamong his manuscripts. The first part of it(Chapters i-xi of the first draft) was publishedin London in 1840 from a copy of the originalMS. In 1870, under the editorship of the Rev.R. L. Tafel, a photographic reproduction of theMS. was made; and from this a transcription ofthe Latin text was made by the Rev. S. H.Worcester, and published in New York by theAmerican Swedenborg Printing and PublishingSociety in 1878, and in subsequent editions. Thepresent English translation has been made fromthis Latin text, corrected after a careful comparisonwith the Photolithographed Edition. What remains of the work, as Swedenborg leftit, is written on 24 sheets measuring 1St x 4tinches. Of these, the first eighteen have beennumbered, 1-16, 19, and 20. The remaining sixsheets are unnumbered. Two sheets, 17 and 18are missing. It consists of a first draft of thetreatise, chapters i-xi (except for the portion ofviii and ix contained in the missing sheets 17 and18), preceded by an " Order and Arrangement"of the chapter headings. To this was subsequentlyadded a revised list of chapter headings, "Thesections in their series." The six unnumberedsheets contain chapter i and part of chapter ii ofa second and fuller draft, also a short draft ofchapters xii and iv on one page, and the headingonly of chapter iii by itself on another page. ii
    • CHARITY From a careful study of the PhotolithographeclEdition of the MS., in which the style of hand-writing of the various corrections and additionsmade in the "Order and Arrangement" andelsewhere has been considered, it appears that thefollowing was Swedenborgs order of writing: A. Order and Arrangement (First list of head- ings). B. First Draft (Chapters i-xi). C. The sections in their series (Revised list of headings resulting from the writing of the First Draft). D. Second Draft (Chapters i and ii only, and some fragments)."Ve have followed this order in the present edition. For the convenience of the reader we have giventwo versions of the " Order and Arrangement,"the first as it stood before Swedenborg started onthe text, and the second after he had made anumber of corrections during the writing of thetext. Numerous changes and deletions occur else-where in the work, but these have not been shown. There is no evidence to show whether any con-siderable time elapsed between the writing of thefirst and second drafts. The date of the work canbe only approximately determined. The earliestpossible date for its completion is the latter partof 1764, after the publication of ANGELIC WISDOMCONCERNING THE DIVINE PROVIDENCE, referred toat the end of chapter xi; but a reference to aprojected work on "The Doctrine of the NewJerusalem concerning Charity" in THE ApOCA-LYPSE REVEALED, no. 915, published in 1766, sug-gests the latter part of 1766 as more probable.This is the date assigned to the work by the Rev.James Hyde in his Bibliography of SwedenborgsTV orks, where the evidence is considered in detail.The Rev. R. L. Tafel, in Documents concerning iii
    • EDITORIAL NOTESwedenborg, Vo!. 2, p. 999, had previously sug­gested that this treatise was the one promised inthe Preface to THE DOCTRINE OF THE LORD underthe title" Angelic vVisdom respecting Life." The only title in the work itself is CHARITY (DeCharitate), which appears at the beginning of thesecond draft. We have adopted this in preferenceto .. The Doctrine of Charity" and .. The Doc­trine of the New Jerusalem concerning Charity,"under which titles the work has previously beenpublished. The numbering of the paragraphs in the presenttranslation is that adopted by the Rev. J. F. Pottsin the S7.vedenborg Concordance. Except for theportions containing Swedenborgs own marginaladditions, the footnotes are the Editors; also thefew additions in the text placed in square brackets. This little work, although unfinished and frag­mentary, consisting as it does in part of merenotes of things to be written, contains neverthelesssustained rational argument and passages of rarebeauty. It presents teaching about charity, as aspiritual endowment given by the Lord to thosewho shun evils as sins against Him, which isentirely consistent with the rest of Swedenborgstheological writings. Its practical bearing on theproblems of social order, government, and thedaily lives of all sorts and conditions of men, willcommend it to those who would learn how to lovetheir neighbour, and in so doing love the LordJesus Christ. I am indebted greatly to the Rev. E. C.Mongredien for valuable assistance and advicegiven me in the preparation of this translation,and for the results of his comparison of the Latintext with the MS., and investigations into theorder of writing of the work. FRANK F. COULSON. iv
    • CONTENTS PAGEORDER AND ARRANGEMENT (First and Second Versions) I T. THE "FIRST" OF CHARITY IS TO LOOK TO THE LORD AND SHUN EVILS BECAUSE THEY ARE SINS; THIS IS DONE BY REPENTANCE . 4 J. In so far as anyollc does not look to the Lord and shun evils because they are sins, he remains in them . 4 2. In so far as anyone does not recognize and know what are sins, he does not see otherwise than that he is without sin . 5 3. In so far as anyone recognizes and knows what are sins, he can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord, and repent of them 5 4. Before repentance, good is spurious good. It is the same with charity, because good is of charity . 7 5. Consequently the" nrst " of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils bccause they are ~m 7 IT. THE "SECOND" OF CHARITY IS TO DO GOODS BECAUSE THEY ARE USES . 9 1. Not wishing to do evil to the neighbour is of charity 10 2. Wishing to do good to the neighbour is of charity II 3. A man may be doing good, which he believes to be of charity, and all the while not be shunning evil; and yet every evil is contrary to charity I I 4. In proportion as a man does not wish to do evil to the neighbour, he wishes to do good to him; but not the reverse. 13 5. Before the good a man does is the good of charity, evil must first be put away, because it is contrary to charity; and this is done by repentance 14 6. Such as the recognition of evil is, and its con­ sequent putting away by repentance, such is the good which is of charity 14 v
    • CONTENTS PAGE 7. Hence it follows that the" first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils because they are sins; and that the "second" of charity is to do goods 15Ill. THE NEIGHBOUR TO BE LOVED IS, IN A SPIRITUAL IDEA, GOOD AND TRUTH 15 1. A man is not a man from the form, but from the good and truth with him, or what is the same, from the will and understanding . 16 l. It is therefore the good and truth with a man that is the neighbour to be loved 17 3· The quality of the neighbour with a man is in accordance with the quality of the good with him; or such as a man is. such a neigh­ bour is he 17 4· The degree of neighbour is in accordance with the degree of good and truth with the man; and hence one man is not neighbour in the same degree [as another] . 18 5· The good ,of the internal will is the neighbour to be loved, and not the good of the external will, unless this makes one with it 20 6. Truth is the neighbour in so far as it makes onc with good, and it makes one with it as a form makes one with its essence 20I . THE OBJECT OF CHARITY IS A MAN, ALSO A SOCIETY, ALSO ONES COUNTRY. ALSO THE HUMAN RACE; ,110 ALL ARE THE NEIGHBOUR IN A NARROW AND IN A WIDE SENSE 21 1. Every individual man is the neighbour accord­ ing to the quality of his good . 22 2. A society. small or large, is the neighbour according to the good of its use. 23 3. Ones country is the neighbour according to its spiritual, moral, and civil good 24 4. The human race is the neighbour in the widest sense; but, because it is distinguished into empires, kingdoms, and republics, anyone of these is a neighbour according to the good of its religion and of its moral qualities, and according to the good which it performs to ones country, and which makes onc with its good 25 l
    • CONTENTS PAGE v. ",rAN IS THE SUBJECT OF CHARITY. AND SUCH AS IS THE CHARITY WITH HIM SUCH A SUBJECT OF IT HE IS; AND SUCH IS THE CHARITY HE EXERCISES TOWARDS THE NEIGHBOUR 27 1. Man was created to be a form of love and wisdom 27 2. At this day, for a man to be man, he o.ught to be a charity in for.!!1 . 28 3. A man ought to be a charity in form, not from himself but from the Lord; thus he is a receptacle of charity . 29 4. A man is a form of charity of such quality as, with him, good of the will is conjoined to truths of the understanding 31 5. Whatever proceeds from such a man derives from that form that it is a likeness of it; thus it is charity 3~ 6. The neighbour can be loved from what is not charity; and yet this, regarded in itself. is not loving the neighbour 34 7. He loves the neir;hbour, who does SJ fronl the charity in himself 35VI. A MAN IS BORN TO THE END THAT HE MAY BECOME A CHARITY; BUT HE CANNOT BECOME A CHARITY UNLESS HE CONSTANTLY DOES THE GOOD OF USE TO THE NEIGHBOUR FROM AIFECTlON ANn DELIGHT. 35 I. The general good exists from the goods of use the individuals each perform; and the goods of use they each perform subsist from the general good 36 2. Ministries, functions, offices, and various occupations are the goods of use the indi ­ viduals each perform, from which the general good exists . 38 3. All the offices and employments, regarded as to the goods of use, make a form which corresponds to the heavenly form . 38 4 They also make a form which corresponds to the human form . 40 5. In this form. each onc is a good of use in accordance with the scope of his office or employment 41B vii
    • CONTENTS PAGE 6. A man is born to the end that he may become a charity; but he cannot become a charity unless he constantly does the goods of use to the neighbour from affection and its delight 42VrI. EVERY l>IAN WHO LOOKS TO THE LORD AND SHUNS EVILS AS SINS BECOMES A FORM 01 CHARITY, PROVIDED THAT HE HONI:STLY, JUSTLY, AND FAITHFULL.Y CARRIES OUT THE WORK OF HIS OCCUPATION OR I:MPL.OYMENT . 42 Charity in the case of the Priest 43 Charity in the case of Governors 44­ Charity in the case of Officials under them 45 Charity in the case of Judges . 45 Charity in the case of the Commander of an Army 46 Charity in the case of Officers under the Comman ­ der of an Army 47 Charity in the case of the Common Soldier 48 Charity in the case of the Business Man 48 Charity in the case of Workmen 49 Charity in the case of Farmers 50 Charity in the case of Ships Captains 50 Charity in the case of Sailors 51 Charity in the case of Servants. .. 52VIII. IS:Ns.lOF CH,RITY ARE AL.L THE THINGS THAT ARE ZORSHIP. . . . 53 I. Charity itslill., is in the Internal man, and its ~ IS in the External 54 • • • • fIX. rBENEFACTlONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL. THE GOODS .. WHICH A M~N WHO IS A CHARITY DOES IN FRgEDOM, . OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF HIS OCCUPATION] . ~-- .56 • • • • • 4. No one is saved by means of these benefactions, but by means of the charity out of WhictWhey are done, and which thereforeTs in these benefactions 56 X. ~IONS OF CHARITY ARE AL.L THOSE THINGS IT BEHOVES .... MAN TO DO IN ADDITION TO THOSE SET FORTH ABOVE 57 viii
    • CONTENTS PAGK XI. THERE AREC£!V~RSI~ OF CHARITY. WHICH ARE VARIOUS ENJOYMENTS AND PLEASURES OF THE BODILY SENSES. USEFUL FOR RECREATING THE MIND (antmus) 59 The conjunction of charity and faith 64The Sections in their Series . 66 I. THE .. F[RST" OF .CH.RITY IS TO LOOK TO THE LORD AND SHUN EV[LS AS S[NS. 68 1. No one can have charity except from the Lord 69 2. No one can have charity from the Lord unless he shuns evils as sins 71 3. A man ought to shun evils as sins. as from himself, while doing so nevertheless from the Lord 74 4. In so far as anyone does not shun evils as sins, he remains in them 75 5. In so far as anyone does not recognize and know what sins are. he sees no otherwise than that he is without sin. 77 6. In so far as anyone recognizes and knows what sins are. he can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord. and repent of them 79 7. Good before repentance is not good. nor, before repentance, is charity charity 80 8. Consequently, the" first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, which is done by repentance 81 11. THE" SECOND" OF CHARITY IS TO DO GOOl) TO THE NEIGHBOUR. 82 1. Not wishing to do evil to the neighbour is .J -- loving him. ____ . . . . 83XII. ,WHERE THERE IS NO TRUTH OF FAITH. THE CHURCH DOES NOT EXIST; AND WHERE THERE IS NO GOOD O! LIFE-;- RELIGION D~T EXIST - 86 IV. THE NEIGHIlOUR IS TO BE LOVED IN ACCORDANCE WITH HIS SPIRITUAL GOOD, AND HIS MORAL. CIVIL. AND NATURAL GOOD THEREFROM; CONSEQUENTLY IT IS GOOD THAT. [N A SPIR[TUAL SENSE. [S THE NEIGHBOUR TO BE LOVED 87 Ill. IN A NATURAL SENSE. THE NEIGHBOUR WHO IS TO BE LOVED IS A FELLOW-CITIZEN. ALSO A SOCIETY, S1<IALL OR LARGE, ALSO ONES COUNTRY. ALSO THE HUMAN RACE 88 ix
    • ORDER AND ARRANGEMENT.* [FIRST VERSION.] 1. THE" FIRST" OF CHARITY IS TO SHUN EVILSBECAUSE THEY ARE SINS. 2. THE" SECOND" OF CHARITY IS TO DO GOODSBECAUSE THEY ARE USES. 3. THE ESSEl-:CE OF CHARITY IS GOOD, WHICH ISUSE; AND THE OBJECTS OF CHARITY ARE, IN 1NARROW SENSE AN INDIVIDUAL MAN, IN A WIDERSENSE i SOCIETY, IN A STILL WIDER SENSE ONESCOUNTRY, t AND IN THE WIDEST SENSE THE HUMANRACE; AND THESE ARE THE NEIGHBOUR. 4. CHARITY ITSELF IS TO ACT HONESTLY, JUSTLY,AND FAITHFULLY, IN EVERY WORK THAT BELONGS TOANYONES OCCUPATION; AND, THROUGH THIS, A MANBECOMES A CHARITY. * This is as Swedenborg first wrote it out, before startingon the text. t Note in left-hand margin: "the Church." 1
    • ORDER AND ARRANGEMENT.* [SECOND VERSION.] I. THE " FIRST" 01 CHARITY IS TO LOOK TOTHE LORD AND SHUN EVILS BECAUSE THEY ARE SINS;THIS IS DONE BY REPENTANCE. 2. THE" SECOND" OF CHARITY IS TO DO GOODS!lECAUSE THEY ARE USES. 3. THE NEIGHBOUR, IN i SPIRITUAL IDEA, IS USE;:ND USE IS THE GOOD OF CHARITY. [4.a] A MAl IS THE SUBJECT OF CHARITY, ANDSUCH AS THE SUBJECT IS, SUCH IS THE CHARITYEXERCISED BY HIM. i" 4. [b] CH.RITY ITSELF WITH ANYONE IS TO ACTHONESTLY, JUSTLY, jND FAITHFliLLY, IN EVERYWORK THAT BELONGS TO HIS OCCUPATIOI; AND,THROUGH THIS, A MAl BECOMES . CH.RITY . .. This is as i l stood after a number of corrections hadlleen incorporated in it. Many of these corrections, as thehandwriting of them made at different times shows, weremade during the wntinl!; of the text. There are a coupleof strokes drawn vertically through these headings, a usualsign with Swedenborg that he had made use of it forre.writini(. This was probably done when the new listof headings, " The sections in their series," was prepared.See page 66. t This heading as inserted between 3 and 4 in theMS. without the succeeding numbers being changed. la
    • FIRST VERSION 5. SIGNS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THE THINGS THATARE OF WORSHIP. 6. BElEFACTIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THEGOODS WHICH A MAN WHO IS A CHARITY DOES, INFREEDOM, OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF HIS OCCUPATION. 7. OBLIGATIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THOSETHINGS IT BEHOVES A MAN TO DO IN ADDITION TOTHOSE ABOVE NAMED. 8. DIVERSIONS OF CHARITY ARE VARIOUS ENJOY­MENTS OF THE BODY AND ITS SENSES. 9. VITHOUT FAITH, CHARITY IS NOT CHARITY;THEY ARE ONE LIKE ESSENCE AND FORM. 10. SUCH AS THE CHARITY IS, SUCH IS THE FAITH;THE FAITH THAT PRECEDES CHARITY IS THE FAITH OFCOGNITIONS, WHICH IS A HISTORICAL FAITH ORMATTER OF KlOWLEDGE. I I. CHARITY CONJOINS A MAN TO THE LORD, ANDTHE LORD TO THE MAN. 12. LOVE TOWARDS THE NEIGHBOUR, WHICH ISCHARITY, INWARDLY IS LOVE TO GOD, THAT IS, THELORD. 2
    • SECOND VERSION S. SIGNS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THE THINGS THATARE OF WORSHIP. 6. BENEFACTIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THEGOODS WHICH A MAN WHO IS A CHARITY DOES, INFREEDOM, OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF I-llS OCCUPATION. 7. OBLIGATIONS OF CHARITY .RE .LL THOSETHINGS IT BEHOVES t. MAN TO DO IN ADDITION TOTHOSE ABOVE NAMED. 8. DIVERSIONS OF CHARITY ARE VARIOUS ENJOY­MENTS AND PLEASURES OF THE BODY AND ITS SENSES. 9. WITHOUT FAITH, CHARITY IS NOT CHARITY,AND WITHOUT CHARITY, FAITH IS NOT FAITH; THEYARE ONE, LIKE ESSENCE AlD FOR,;!. 10. SUCH AS THE CHARITY IS, SUCH IS THE FAITH;THE FAITH THAT PRECEDES CHARITY IS THE FAITH OFCOGNITIONS, WHICH IS A HISTORICAL FAITH, IXITSELF KNOWLEDGE. 11. IN CHARITY THERE IS THE CONJUNCTION OF AMAN WITH THE LORD, .XD OF THE LORD WITH THEMAN. 12. CHARITY, OR LOVE TOWARDS THE NEIGHBOUR,IS ALSO LOVE TO THE LORD. a
    • THE .. FIRST" 01" CHARITY IS TO LOOK TO THE LORD AND SHUN EVILS BECAUSE THEY ARE SINS; THIS IS DOSE BY REPENTANCE. To be expounded in this order: (I) In so far as anyone does not shun evils because they are sins, he remains in them. (2 ) In so far as anyone does not recognize and know what are sins, he does not see other­ wise than that he is ~Vit/101lt sin. (3) In so far as anyone recognizes and k11O~VS what are sins, he can see Ihem in himself, confess them before the Lord. andrepent of them. (4) Before repenlallce, good is spurio1/s good. It is I,he same with charity, beca1/se good is of charity. (5) Consequently the " first" of charity is to look to the Lord and sh1/1I evils because they are sins.2 I. In so far as anyone does not looh 10 the Lord and shun evils because they are sins, he remains in them. Man is born into evils of every kind. His will, which is his proprium, * is nothing but evil. Unless, therefore, a man is reformed and regenerated, he not only remains just as he was born, but becomes even worse, because he adds actual evils himself to those hereditarily acquired. A man remains such if he does not shun evils as sins. Shunning them as sins is shunning them as * The Latin word propri/l m means" what is ones own," Swedenborg IIses it in a special sense involving what is of the self, 4
    • NOS. 1-4 diabolical and hellish, and thus deadly, and because accordingly there is eternal damnation in them. If a man so regards them, then he believes that there is a hell and a heaven; he also believes that the Lord can remove evils, if he, too, as from himself, makes an effort to remove them. But the things which are shown on this subject in THE DOCTRINE OF LIFE FOR THE NEW JERUSALEM, nos. 108-113, may be seen, to which I will add this: All evils are innately delightful, because man is born into the love of self, and that love delights in all the things that are of his proprium, that is, the things that he wills and thinks. Unless these inbred delights are subdued, everyone remains in them until death; and they are not subdued unless they are regarded as sweet poisons which kill, or as flowers beautiful in appearance but inwardly toxic, that is, unless the delights of the evils are regarded as being fatal, and this until they become undelightful.3 2. In so far as anyone does not recognize and know what are sins, he does not see otherwise than that he is without sin. Because of the Word, he knows that he is a sinner, in evils from head to foot, yet he does not really know, because he does not see any sin in himself. Consequently he prays with a ringing voice as it were, he confesses with a ringing voice as it were, and yet inmostly in hirriself he believes that he is not a sinner. This belief is made evident in the other life; for then he says, " I am pure, I am clean, I am guiltless "; nevertheless, when he is examined, he is impure, unclean, indeed even carrion. I t is as if the ski n were outwardly clear and soft, [but] the inner parts from the heart itself were diseased; or as if a liquid were, on the sur ­ face, like water, but in its depths putrid from stagnation.4 3. In so far as anyone recognizes and knows 5
    • CHARITYwhat are sins, he can see them in himself, confessthem before the Lord, and repent of them. It is said that he can if he will, and he whobelieves in eternal life does will. But even so, heought to think not about the things he does, butabout those he wants to do, which, when he be­lieves them allovvable, he also does, or, if he doesnot do them, it is on account of the world. Thereis an internal effect and an external eJlect, orinternal and external deed. The external effect ordeed proceeds and has "existence from the internalefTect or deed, just as action from effort. Effort ina man is will; consequently, although he does notdo a thing in body, yet if he makes it allowable,then the effort or will remains, and this, in spirit,is action itself. Therefore, recognizing and know­ing what his sins are is recognizing and knowinghis thoughts, and in them what he makes allow­able, and then what he lusts after and favours inhis thought. For example, if a man considerswhether whoredom is a sin, and what a serious sinit is, whether hatred and acts of revenge are sins,whether thefts and the like, arrogance and pride,contempt also for others, and avarice, are sins; hemust then remove any disguises he has cast overthem, that is, any confirmations, and let him con­ sult the vVord. and he will see. Everyone sees that he who acknowledges that a sin is a sin lcan see the sins in himselrj ; but he who makes them allowable in thought, and, on account of the world, not allowable in the body, cannot sec them. He is like a man turning a mirror upside down to see his face, or like one who wants to sec his face putting a piece of linen gauze in front of it.-¥.­ * Note on the left-hand margin of the original MS.:Investigation: I, If only as to actions it does not find outmuch," and this does not suffice; the reason; 2, but if asto thoughts and intentions then it finds out more; 3, butif he investigates what he reckons as a sin or as not a sin, G
    • NOS. 5-86 4. Befure repentance, good is spurious good. It is the same with charity, because guod is uf charity. For therc is evil inwardly with the man, because it has not been opcned, and therefore not healed; and genuine good cannot spring from evil. The fountain is impure. The good which springs from evil may, in its outward form, appear good; but within it, is the man, such as he is inwardly. All that the man does thence is an image of him. Before the angels he himself appears in his own image, indeed, outside himself; which I have seen a thousand times. On this account the good which anyone does with the body may appear good before those who see only the external; but within there lies hidden the will and intention, which may be that he wishes to be thought sincere and good, so that he may impose on others for the sake of honour and gain. In a word, it is good that is either merit-seeking, or hypocritical, or diabolical, which is in order to deceive, revenge, kill, etc.; but this good is taken away at death when he is let into his interior things, and it becomes openly evil.7 Every good that a man does to the neighbour is of charity, or is charity. The quality of the charity therefore may be recognized from the three things preceding, namely: I, To what extent he shuns evils as sins; 2, To what extent he knows and recognizes what are sins; 3, And to what extent he has seen them in himself, confessed them, and repented. These are the indications to anyone of what quality is the charity he has.S 5. Consequently the "first" of charity is to then he finds out indeed. For whatever a man makes allowable in himself, that he does. To make allowable is of the will; it is effort, and in spirit is a deed; and he will do it in the body when obstacles are removed. Machiavellians also are such. 7
    • CHARITY look to the Lord and shun evils becau$e they a-re sins. Every good which a man does to the neighbour for the sake of the neighbour, or for the sake of truth and good, thus for the sake of what is in accordance with the -Vord, or for the sake of religion, thus for the sake of God, which therefore is from a spiritual love or affection, is called a good of charity, or a good work. This is not good in so far as it derives [anything] from the man, but is good in so far as it is from the Lord* through the man. The Lord does good to everyone, chiefly through others, but yet so that Cl man scarcely knows otherwise than that it is from himself; and therefore He quite often moves the wicked to do good to others, but from an affection of the love of self and of the world. This good is indeed of the Lord or from the Lord, but the man is not on that account rewarded. But a man is rewarded if he does good, not from a merely natural love or affection, but from a spiritual love or affection. The reward is the heavenly delight of that love and affection, which awaits him in eternity; and this in so far as he does not do it from himself, that is, in so far as he believes that all good is from the Lord, and does not place merit in it.9 That no one can from himself do good which is good, but that in so far as a man shuns evils as sins, he does goods not from himself but from the Lord, may be seen in THE DOCTRINE OF LIFE FOR THE NEW JERUS,LEM, FROM THE PRECEPTS OF THE DECALOGUE, nos. 9-17, and 18-31.IQ From these it is evident that before repentance it is charity, the good of which is not from the Lord but from the man; but after repentance it is charity the good of which is not from the man * The Latin original has ex liomine (from the man), but the context demands ex Domino (from the Lord). 8
    • NOS. 9-13 but from the Lord. For the Lord cannot enter with a man, and do any good from Himself through him, before the devil, that is, evil, is cast out, but after he is cast out. The devil is cast out by repentance, and when he is cast out the Lord enters and does good there through the man, yet always in such a way that the man does not per­ ceive otherwise than that he is doing it from him­ self; though he knows nevertheless that it is from the Lord.I From these things it is now evident that the " first" of charity is to shun evils as sins, which is done by repentance. Who does not see that an impenitent man is wicked? And who does not see that a wicked man has not charity? And who does not see that he who has not charity cannot do charity? Charity must be from charity in the man.u In conclusion, let some passages be brought for­ ward from the Word, for example from the Lords words to the Pharisees, about the internal man having to be purified. Passages in Isaiah i. Some of the passages in THE DOCTRINE OF LIFE FOR THE NEW JERUSALEM, nos. 28-31; also 50-52. II3 THE" SECO;O;D" OF CILRITY IS TO DO GOODS BECAUSE THEY ARE USES. To be expounded in this order: (I) Doing no evil to the neighbour is of charity. (2) Wishing to do good to the neighbour is of charity. (3) A man may be doing good, which he believes to be of charity, and all the while not be shunning evil; and yet every evil is contrary to charity. 9
    • CHARITY (4) In proportion as a man does not wish to do evil to the neighbour, he wishes to do good to him; but not the reverse. (5) Before the good a man does is the good of charity, evil must first be put away, because it is contrary to charity; and this is done by looking to the Lord, and by repentance. (6) Such as the recognition of evil is, and its consequent putting away by repentance, such is the good which is of charity. (7) H el/ce it follows that the" first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils as sins; and that the " second" of charity is to do goods.14 1. Not wishing to do evil to the neighbour is of charity. Everyone sees that charity does not do evil to the neighbour, because charity is love towards the neighbour, and he who loves someone is afraid of doing evil to him. There is a conjunction of minds bet"veen them. It is because of this that, when he does evil to him to whom he is conjoined by love, it is perceived in his mind as though he were doing evil to himself. Who can do evil to his children, wife, or friends ?-For doing- evil is contrary to the good of love. 115 vVho does not see that anyone hating another, acting against him with hostility and animosity, burning with revenge, and desiring his death, is not loving the neighbour? that anyone who would commit whoredom with someone elses wife, who would deflower virgins and abandon them, or violate women, is not loving the neighbour? that he who would plunder and upon one pretext or another steal his goods, who injures another per­ sons reputation by slandering and so bearing false witness, is not loving the neighbour? Nor, in­ deed, he who covets his house, his wife, or the 10
    • NOS. 14-19 many other things that are his neighbours? From which it is evident that not wishing to do evil to the neighbour is of charity.16 Concerning this Paul writes thus, " Loving the neighbour is fulfilling the law," in two places.* And elsewhere from the Word:17 2. Wishing to do good to the neighbour is of charity. This is well known, for it is believed that giving to the poor, succouring the needy, assisting widows and orphans, benefiting ministers, contributing to churches, hospitals, and various pious uses, is of charity; again, that feeding the hungry, giving drink to the thirsty, sheltering the stranger, cloth­ ing the naked, visiting the sick, going to those bound in prison, and many other things, are good works of charity. But yet they are good only in so far as a man shuns evils as sins. If the man does these good works before shunning evils as sins, they are external, even merit-seeking, because they spring from an impure fountain, and things issuing from such a fountain are inwardly evil. There is the man in them, and the world in them.18 That doing Christian good works is of charity is well known; and many people believe that good cancels out evil, and that so there are not [any] evils with a man, or that they are not regarded; but good does not cancel out evil unless the man thinks about the evils with himself, and repents of them.19 There are many who have so believed, and have supposed that there was no evil with them. When examined, they have confessed that they were full of evils, and that unless they were kept in external things, they could not be saved . .. Probably Rom. xiii. 8,10, and Gal. v. /4 were intended. II
    • CHARITY20 3. A mall may be doing good, which he believes t~ be of charity, and all the while not be shunning evil; and yet every evil is contrary to charity. It is evident that to shun evil [and to do Chris ­ tian good] are two distinct things; for there are people who do every good of charity from piety and from thinking about eternal life, and all the while they do not knov that hating, bearing revenge, committing whoredom, plundering and injuring, slandering, and so bearing false witness, and many [other things, are to bc shunned]. There are judges who live piously, and yet do not count it a sin to make their judgments on a basis of friendslliv, relationship, or with a view to honour and gain; and even if they do know they are evils, they confirm themselves in the belief that they are not. So also do others. In a word, there are two distinct things, shunning cvils as sins, and doing Christian good. He who shuns evils as sins does Christian goods, but they who do good and do not shun evils as sins, do not do any Christian good; for evil is contrary to charity, and is therefore to be abolished first before the good which anyone does is accompanied with charity, that is, is of charity. No one is able to do good and at the samc timc to do evil, or to will good and also evil. 21 Evcry good that in itself is good proceeds from the interior will. From this will, evil is removed by repentance.:-i.H. Thc evil into which a ll1an is born resides I here also. Unless, therefore, he repents, evil rcmains in the interior will, and the good proceeds from the exterior will, and so his condition is a perverted one. The interior qualifies the exterior, and not thc exterior the interior. The Lord says: " Cleanse first that which is within the cup and platter. "* * Matt. xxiii. 26. 12
    • NOS. 20-2622 Man has a twofold will, interior and exterior. The interior will is purified by repentance; and then the exterior does good from the interior. Exterior good does not remove the evil of lusting, OF evils root.23 4. In proportion as a man does not wish to do evil to the neighbour, he wishes to do good to him; but not the reverse. There is civil good, there is moral good, and there is spiritual good. Good, before a man shuns evils as sins, is civil and moral good; but as a man shuns evils as sins, the good, both civil good and moral good, becomes spiritual as well, but not before.24 Lusting lies hidden within, and its delight is outside. When, therefore, a man thinks from lusting and its delight, either he confirms evil and believes it to be allowed, and so is in evil; or he does not think about any evil with himself, and so believes himself to be sound.25 It is true that a man ought to confess to being a sinner, and that from the head to the sole of the foot there is no soundness in him. This he can say, and say from knowledge j but still he cannot inwardly believe it unless he" knows it through investigation. Then he can say these things, and then he first discerns that there is no soundness in him. In this and in no other way is the ulcer opened and healed. In any other way it is palliative curing.26 Did not the Lord preach repentance; the dis- ciples also; and John the Baptist? Isaiah says that the first thing" is to cease from evils, and that then one learns to do good. * Nor does one know, before that, what is good, or of what quality good is. Evil does not know * Isaiah i. 16, 7. c la
    • CHARITY what is good; whereas good, from knowing what is good, knows evil. 27 5. Before the good a man does is the good of charity, evil must first be put away, because it is contrary to charity; and this is done by repentance. Since evil must first be known for the reason that it is to be put away, the Decalogue was the " first" of the Word, and in the whole of Christen­ dom is also the " first" of the doctrine of the Church. All are initiated into the Church through knowing evil, and, because it is against God, not doing it. 28 Therefore this "first" was so holy, for the reason that no one is able to do Christian good before. 29 That good follows, is clear.ly evident from ,this: A judge says, I do not intend to pass judgmentN .B. from evil, for various reasons, but justly; and he does good. 30 A farmer says, I do not intend to do my work except justly and faithfully; so he does good work. 31 So in a thousand other instances; when anyone does not do evil he does good. 32 It can therefore be taken as a maxim, that to shun evil as sin is to do good. 33 6. Such as the recognition of evil is, and its consequent putting away by repentance, such is the good which is of charity. According as a man knows what is more or less evil. According as he knows the evils of faith and also the evils of life. And how he desists from them; And desists from them as he looks to the Lord and believes in Him. 34 Examples can teach. Whether he is such inwardly; then the purer he is; then of better water is the fountain from which his good flows. 14.
    • NOS. 27-4235 In a word, good to anyone is good in the same degree and of the same kind as evil to him is evil. The one cannot be separated from the other.J6 In so far as anyone puts off the old man, he puts on the new.37 In so far as anyone crucifies the flesh, he lives in the spirit.38 No one can serve two masters at the same time.39 Recognition involves that what is true and what is false has to be known. Putting away is of the will. Both are of the life.40 7. Hence it follows that the (( first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils because they are sins; and that the (( second" of charity is to do goods. An evil man, as well as a good one, can do good. He can help someone in need, can do him many good offices, from goodwill, kindness, friend­ ship, or compassion. But nevertheless these things are not of charity with the one who does them, but with the one to whom the charity is exercised. To outward appearance it is charity.41 When anyone has shunned an evil as a sin several times, then there appears to him only the good that he is doing; and they [that is, the prior shunning of evil and the subsequent doing of good] are with him together. But nevertheless the one must be prior; and the one really is prior and interior. III42 THE NEIGHBOUR TO DE LOVED IS, IN A SPIRITUAL IDEA, GOOD AND TRUTH. It is said, " in a spiritual idea ", because it is in this that the spiritual man is interiorly, and because the angels are in the same idea. This idea is dis­ sociated from matter, from space and time, and dissociated especially from person. 15
    • CHARITY Arrangement into order: (1) A man is not a man from the form, but from the good and truth with him; or what is the . same, from the will and understanding. (2) It is therefore the good and truth with a man that is the neighbour to be loved. (3) The quality of neighbour with a man is in accordance with the quality of the good and truth with him; or such as the man is, such a neighbour is he. (4) The degree of neighbour is in accordance with the degree of good and truth with the man, and hence one man is not neighbour in the same degree as another. (5) The good of the internal will is the neigh­ bour to be loved, and not the good of the external will, unless this makes one with it. (6) Truth is tlte neighbour in so far as it pro­ ceeds from good, and makes one with it as a form makes one with its essence.43 1. A man is not a man tram the form, but from the good and truth with him, 01 what is the same, from the will and ullderstanding. That the will and understanding are the man himself, not the form, which may appear like a man in face and body, is well known. There are some who are foolish and insane, and yet they appear to be men. There are some so natural that they are like animals, except that they can speak. There are others who are rational, and others who are spiritual. It may even be that the human for.m of the latter appears less beautiful, yet they are men more than the former. Take good and truth away from them, and there is a human form with­ out a man in it. They are like paintings and sculp­ tures, and like apes. 16
    • NOS. 43-50 44 It is said, .. good and truth, that is, will and understanding," because Rood is of the will, and truth is of the understanding; for the will is the receptacle of good, and the understanding is the receptacle of truth. 4S But yet it is only in their subject that good and truth can be. A thing cannot be separated from its subject; and therefore man is the neighbour; but in a spiritual idea it is good and truth, man being a man from these. 46 2. It is therefore the good and truth with a mall that is the neighbour to be loved. Put in front of you three or ten persons whom you may select for some domestic matter. Do you select otherwise than according to the good and truth with them? It is from the latter that a man is a man. 47 If you are selecting someone for your household staff out of ten persons, do you not inquire about his will and understanding? 48 The one of them you select is to you the neigh- bour who is loved. In like manner, a devil-man may, in face, look like an angel-man. Is it not an angel-man that is to be loved, not a devil-man? You do good to an angel-man on account of the good and truth with him, but not to a devil-man. Charity requires that the latter should be punished if he does evil, and the angel-man rewarded. 49 If you have in view ten maidens for the purpose of selecting one of them to be your wife, five of whom are harlots and five chaste, do you not select One of the chaste, in accordance with the good in her that agrees with your own? 50 3. The quality of the neighbour with a man is in accordnnce with the quality oft he good [and truth] with him; or sLlch as a man is, such a neigh- bOllr is he. The Lords parable of the man wounded by robbers, where it is said that the one who helped 17
    • OiARITY him is neighbour,* teaches that not every man IS neighbour in the same way as another.51 He who does not make distinctions in regard to the neighbour in accordance with the quality of the good and truth with him may be deceived a thou­ sand times; his charity becomes confused and at length what is not charity. A devil-man may exclaim, " I am your neighbour: do good to me! " and if you do good to him, he may kill you or others. You are placing a knife or a sword in his hands.52 This is what the simple do. They say, " Every man is equally my neighbour," also" It is not my business to investigate his quality, but this is re­ garded by God; I must simply help my neigh ­ bour." Yet this is not loving the neighbour. He who loves a neighbour from genuine charity finds out what sort of a man he is, and does good to him with discrimination, in accordance with the quality of his good. 53 In the other life such simple people are removed from others and kept apart; for if they come among diabolical spirits they are drawn into doing good to them, and into doing evil to the good. The evil cry out, " Set me free, help me!" ThisN.B. is the very great strength that they acquire for themselves. Without the help of the simple, and as it were conjunction with them, they are not strong at all; but together with those they have deceived by the name of " neighbour," they are strong. 54 Genuine charity itself is prudent and wise. TheN .B. other charity is spurious, because it is of the will or of good only, and not at the same time of the understanding, or of truth. SS 4. The degree of neighbour is in accordance with the degree of good and truth with the mall; • Luke x. 29-37. 18
    • :,105. 51-60 and hence one man is not neighbour in the same degree [as another]. Good is distinguished, in accordance with its degrees, into civil good, moral good, and spiritual good.56 The neighbour a man ought to love from charity is spiritual good. Apart from this good there is no charity; for the good of charity is spiritual good, since it is in accordance with that good that, in the case of each one in the heavens, conjunction is effected.57 Moral good, which is human good itself, being the rational good according to which man lives with man as a brother and companion, is the neigh- bour according to how much it derives from spiri- tual good. For moral good without spiritual good is external good; it is of the external will, and is not internal good. It may be evil, which ought not to be loved.58 Civil good is the good of a life in accordance with the civil laws; and its beginning and founda- tion, which is " not to act against those laws," is on account of the penalties. If there is not moral good in this good, and spiritual good within that, then it is no other than the animal good in which beasts are, when kept shut up or chained, towards those who feed, punish, or caress them.59 A man learns these goods in early childhood from the Decalogue. The laws of the Decalogue are first made civil laws, next moral laws, and at length spiritual laws; and then first the goods become goods of charity, in accordance with these degrees.60 Charity itself regards the good of a mans soul first, and loves it as being that by which conjunc- tion is effected. Next, it regards his moral good, and loves that in so far as he lives morally, in accordance with the state of perfection of his reason. And lastly it regards the civil good, in 19
    • CHARITY accordance with which a man has his standing in the world. Through his civil good a man is a man of the world; in accordance with his moral good he is a man above the worldly man and lower than the heavenly; but in accordance with his spiritual good he is a man of heaven, or an angel. The associating of men together is effected through this good, and then, according to these degrees, through the goods of the lower degrees. For example: There is the spiritual man who wishes well and does not understand well; and a man who does not understand well does not do well, so that he is scarcely a rational moral man. There is the man who understands well and does not wish well. He is the neighbour accoruing to the understanding. But a man who does not wish well, however well he understands, is not the neighbour.61 In a word, the will makes the neighbour, and the understanding in so far as it is of the will.62 5. The good of the internal will is the neighbour to be loved, and not the good of the external will, unless this makes one with it. There is an internal will and an external will; likewise an,internal and an external understanding.63 The internal will has conjunction with heaven, and the external will with the world.64 Every good is of the will; and the good-of­ charity itself is the good of the internal will.65 I t is customary for these to be separated with man; and they are separated to the greatest extent with hypocrites, pretenuers, and flatterers for the sake of gain.66 But when those wills make a one, then both the goods make one good, which is the neighbour. These things to be illustrated by means of exam ­ ples, and comparisons.67 6. Truth is the neighbotlt in so far as it makes one with good, and it makes one with it as a form makes one with its essence. 20
    • NOS. 61-72 Every form derives its own [character] from an essence; therefore, such as the essence is, such is the form.68 This can be illustrated by the fact that the understanding, regarded in itself, is such as the will is.69 It can be illustrated by sound and speech. And by several other things.70 That truth is good in form, may be seen in THE APOCALYPSE EXPLAINED. *71 From this it is evident that, in a spiritual idea, good is the neighbour to be loved; or a man accord ­ ing to his good. IV7 2 THE OBJECT OF CHARITY IS A MAN, ALSO A SOCIETY, ALSO ONES COUNTRY, ALSO THE HUMAN RACE; AND ALL ARE THE NEIGHBOUR IN A NARROW AND IN A WIDE SENSE. That a man is the neighbour is well known. A society is the neighbour because a society is a composite man; ones country is the neighbour because it consists of many societies, and so is a more composite man; and the human race is the neighbour because it is composed of large societies, each one of which is a man in composite form, hence it is a man in the widest sense. Let these things be explained in this order: (I) Every individual malL is the neighbour according to the quality of his good. (2) A society, small or large, is the neighbour according to the good of its use. (3) O~o!l:-ntry is the neighb,?ur according to its spiiltual, moral, and civil good. * See nos. 136, 2422, 4782, 725. 21
    • CHARITY (4) The human race is the neighbour in the widest sense; but, because it is distinguished into empires, kingdoms, and republics, any one of these is a neighbour according to the good of its religion, and according to the good which it performs to ones country and to itself.73 I. Every individual man is the neighbour according to the quality of his good. Since, in a spiritual idea, good is the neighbour, and a man is the subject of good, and also the object of him who does good, it follows that in a natural idea a man is the neighbour.74 One man is not the neighbour more than another in respect of his person merely, but in respect of the good from which he is such and such a man; for there are as many differences of neighbour as there are of good, and the differences of good are infinite.75 It is supposed that a brother, a kinsman, or a relation, is more the neighbour than a stranger; and that anyone born in ones country is the neigh­ bour more than one born outside it; but everyone, whether Greek or Gentile, is the neighbour accord­ ing to his good.76 The neighbour indeed is what everyone is accord­ ing to spiritual relationship and kinship. This can be seen from the fact that after death every man comes among his own, with whom he is similar in respect of good, or, what is the same, similar in regard to affections. Moreover, natural relation­ ships perish after death, spiritual relationships taking their place; for all in the same heavenly society recognize one another, and are associated together because they are in a similar good. Of ten brothers in the world, five may be in hell, and five in heaven, and the latter five in different 22
    • NOS. 73-81 societies; and when they meet they do not recog­ nize one another. In fact they are, each one, in face, their own affections. From this it is evident that every man is the neighbour according to the quality of his good.77 The goods according to the quality of which a man is the neighbour are especialIy spiritual goods. Charity regards these in the first place.78 2. ,1 society, small or large, is the neighbo!tr according to the good of its use. Every society in a kingdom is established in accordance with the uses [in that kingdom], which are various. There are societies whose work is to administer justly various civil affairs, which are manifold; various judicial affairs; various affairs relating to the structure of the state; and various ecclesiastical affairs, such as consistories, acad­ emies, and schools. There are societies for the advancement of knowledge, which also are several.79 Every society can be regarded no otherwise than as a man in composite form; for which reason it is the neighbour according to the good of use it performs. If a society performs eminent uses, it is the neighbour t~ a greater extent; if lowly uses, it is the neighbour to a lesser extent; if evil uses, it is the neighbour no otherwise than as a wicked man is; and the good I desire for him is that he may become good, and be provided, so far as is possible, with the means to improve, even though it should be by threats, corrections, penalties, or privations.80 A society having one function cannot be regarded except as one composite man. lVhen a kingdom is regarded as a man, certain persons are calIed members of the government; but among them­ selves they constitute one man, whose members are the individuals therein.81 This is the same as in heaven. There every society, smalI or large, is as one man. It is also 23
    • CHARITY presented to view as one man. I have seen an eminent society as one man. The form of heaven is the human form.82 So, too, a society on earth appears as one man before angels in the heavens.83 3. Ones country is the neigl1b.Qur according to its spiritual, moral, and civil good. J In everyones idea his country is as it were one thing; and therefore all the laws, both those relat ­ ing to justice and those relating to the structure of the state, are framed as it were for one man. His country, therefore, is as it were a man in com­ pound form: it is, besides, c~~~__ b-?~y! .in w!!,!ch the king.i~j.!Lthesup_ren~e_posltlOn. Its good, which ought to be considered, is termed the public good and the common good. It is also said of the king that the people are in the body of his government.84 Indeed, when it pleases the Lord, aQLone king- ~ dom iLPE~ented to view b_t:fore angels in heaven as one man, in the form, moreover, answering to its quality. That form is the form of their spiritual raffection; th~~C.!ts face -15elng tne----rorrrt of /fIthe affection of its spiritual good, and the form of I its body being the form of its civil good, while its ~ manners, speech, and the like, are its rational good. When o~_sees a kingdom as one man, it Ican be seen such as It really is; and In accordance_. /IWiilitl1iSiti-S theneighbour.~ Birth does not make anyone the neighbour more than another, not even when it is ones mother or father; nor does education. These are estimations from natural good. Nor does kinship nor relation ­ ship make anyone a neighbour more than another, thus country does not either. Ones country should be loved according to the quality of its good; but it is a duty to do good to it, and this is done by having regard for its use, since one thus has regard l for the welfare of all. It is nota duty tOdoiood J No other kingdOmSoutside that one, because one 24
    • NOS, 82-87 kingdom does n~sire l-he good of ano~her, but would ilKe- to destroy it as to wea!tnana power, thus also as to its protection. To lov~()t.!!er kingdom more than ones own, therefore, by hav-I lEg more._regard for its use, woul~ contrary to the good of the kingdom one is.in; for WhiCh) reason ones country should be loved in a higher degree.86 Take .this example: If I had been born in Venice or Rome, and if I were a Reformed Christian; ought my country, or where I ~ born, to be loved, for its spiritual _K()2d? I <;annotJove it on th~Q..I"l_nt, nor on account of its moral and civil good in so far as this depends, as it does, on its spiritual good. In so far, however, as it does not depend on this, I can, even though that country hates me. So I must not hate an unfriendly or hostile country, but must still love it, bringing no harm upon it, but having r~ard for its~ i_~~o ) far as it has good, but not having such regard to it as to confirm it in its own falsity and evil. But more about the love of country in another place.87 4. The human 1ace is the neighbour in the widest sense; but, because it is distinguished into empires, kingdoms, and republics, any 0Tt!!...Ef th~se is a neig~bour accordin!!:o the ~ootrOf1.ts 1errifon and oT~ts momZ qualItIes, and accordmg to the good which it performs to ones count1y, and which makes one with its own good. These subjects are too extensive to be separately elucidated, It is en0ug-h that, if some man or other, from some kingdom or other, is at my house, and I am staying in the same house as he is, or in the same city. to me he is th~n the neig-h­ bour according to his good. ItJLthe__same with all in that kingdom whom that particular man resembles~ Slipposing he is an ambassador of that kingdom, representing his king and therefore the 25
    • CHARITY kingdom; it cannot then be denied that to me he is the neighbQur~<:ording to the good of h~eIl­ Ngion and of his moraf qua:Iifies-;- ana ac~iainLas JI ~:wishes good to my country and his own; especi­ ally in so far as this makes one with his own good.88 I am not speaking of any other good than the good of charity, and the good of genuine charity. ~ It ~ossible for wicke<Lp.e_Q2J~[Jobbersand devils ev~n, to I~~e_each other mutually, fiUt not fromcharity, or thegoodoCinterior love. But because- of their joining in evil-doing, stealing, whoring, taking revenge, killing, and blasphem­ ing, they are neighbours among themselves. These are not meant, however, because charity and its good are treated of here.89 I can love all in the universe according to their religion, not mQ~SO those~y native land than those in other kingdoms, nor those in Europe more th.an those in Africa. I love a Gentile in preference f :to_ a Christ!M.~e liveLwcll accora~his eligion, if he worsllip"s God from the heart, say­ ing, " I will not do this evil because it is against God." I do not love him on account of his doc­ trine however, but on account of his life; since if I love him on account of his doctrine only, I am loving him as an external man, while if I love him Ion account of his life, I .am loving him as ~n ~internal man. For if he has the good of religion, he also has moral good, and civil good as well. They cannot be separated. But he who is only in doctrine cannot have religion. And so his moral and civil good does not have life in it. It is merely external. It wants to be seen, and to be thought to exist. 26
    • NOS. 88-92 v90 MAN IS THE SUBJECT OF CHARITY, ANn SUCH AS IS THE CHARITY WITH HIM SUCH A SUBJECT OF IT HE IS; AND SUCH IS THE CHARITY HE EXERCISES TOWARDS THE NEIGHBOUR.* Let these things be explained in this order: (I) Man was created to be a form of love and wisdom. (2) At this day, for a man to be man, he ought to be a charity in form. (3) .4 man ought to be a charity in form, not from himself but from the Lord,. thus he is a receptacle of charity. (4) A man is a form of charity of such a quality as, with him, good of the will is conjoined to truths of the understanding. (5) TVhatever proceeds from such a man derives from that form that it is a likeness of it; thus it is charity. (6) The neighbour can be loved from what is not charity,. and ;yet this, regarded in itself, is not loving the neighbour. (7) He is loving the neighbour, who loves hinl from the charity in himself.91 I. Man was created to be a form of love and wisdom. He was created into the image of God, into the likeness of God ;i and God is Love Itself and Wisdom Itself.92 It is well known that such as a man is by virtue • In the MS. this heading has been deleted. Cf. 4a in the "Order and Arrangement" on page la, and V in " The sections in their series" on page 66. t Genesis i. 26. 27
    • CHARITY of wisdom, such is the man; but the life of wisdom is love, and love is the essence, and wisdom is the form of love, as is shown in many places in ANGELIC WISDOM CONCERNING THE DIVINE LOVE AND WISDOM, to which. it is not necessary to add more here.93 2. At this day, for a man to be man, he ought to be a charity in form. I t is said, at this day, because, in the process of time since the first creation, man has become external. For from love to the Lord he has turned away to wisdom. He has eaten of the tree of knowledge, and eaten of wisdom; and internal love is turned into exterior love.94 The third heaven, which is from the first men, is in love and wisdom; whereas the second heaven is from the lower love called charity, and from the wisdom called intelligence. And at length, when man has become altogether external, then his love is called charity, and his wisdom, faith. Such is the state of the Church with men at this day.9S With some there is spiritual love, but not celes­ tial love, and spiritual love is charity; but with them then faith is the truth, and the truth makes the understanding or intelligence.96 By a charity in form is meant that the mans life is a charity, and the form is from his life; but how this is will be told in what follows in the fourth article.97 In heaven an angel appears in form as a charity. The quality of the charity is apparent from the face and is heard from the voice, a man after death becoming his own love, that is, the affection of his own love. Neither spirit nor angel is anything else; indeed, the form of his charity is in fact the spirit or angel himself in respect of his whole body. By some an angel was seen, and they discerned the form of his charity in each of his members, which is marvellous. 28
    • NOS. 93-102g8 In the world a man is not a charity in respect of his form, in face, body, or voice, but his mind may be; and after death his mind is a spirit in human form. Nevertheless, a sincere man, who thinks nothing contrary to charity, can be known from his face and voice; with difficulty however, because there exist such hypocrites as are able to imitate to the life, and even to put on, the sincerity of charity. But if an angel looks at his face and hears his voice, he recognizes what he is, not seeing the material cov(ring that is over it, to which, how­ ever, a material man pays attention. 99 The forms of charity are innumerable, as many as the angels of the second heaven. In number they are unlimited. The varieties of charity are as many as the varieties of the affection of truth from good; and this affection is charity.lOO He who is not a form of charity is a form of hatred, or he who is not a form of the affection of truth from good, is a form of the affection of falsity from evil. It is of such that hell consists: they are all varieties of hatred and of lusting.101 As there are genera of affections, and species of these genera, so there are also of charities. There are therefore charities in the plural, and there are degrees of charity of a twofold kind; which degrees are dealt with in ANGELIC WISDOM CONCERNING THE DIVINE LOVE AND WISDOM, PART nl.102 3. A man ought to be a charity in form, not from himself but from the Lord,. thus he is a receptacle of charity. The life of a man who is to be regenerated is the affection of truth from good, or charity; and that life does not exist except from Life, thus from the Lord, who is Life in Himself, as He Himself teaches: that He is " the Way, the Truth, and the Life" ;* and elsewhere, that " As the Father hath Life in Himself, so hath He given unto the * John xiv. 6. o 29
    • CHARITY Son to have Life in Himself" j* and elsewhere. But, because Life is God, the Divine cannot be appropriated to man, who is finite and created, but it can inl10w into, and be adjoined to, a receptacle; just as the eye is not light in itself, but can receive light, and as the ear is not hearing in itself, but is the receptacle for it. So with the rest of the senses. So, also, with the mind and its interior senses.103 Man, therefore, is indeed the subject of charity, but a receptive subject, for he is created into a form receptive of life, just as the eye is created into a form receptive of light and its objects of sight by means of light; and the ear into a form receptive of sound by means of inflowing sound with its harmonies.104 He who believes he is a form of charity from himself is mistaken; either he believes that he is God, or he believes that the Divine is transfused into him: so he denies God; or, if he does not think this, he places merit in works of charity, and so his external is made a charity, and not his internal; and in that case the Lord cannot dwell with him. The Lord does not dwell in the things of a mans proprium, but in that which is His own. He must dwell in what is Divine, and so He makes the man receptive of the Divine proceeding, which is of charity.JOS Man, however, is so created that he may think and will as from himself, and therefore speak and act as from himself; yet it is given him to know that every good of charity and truth of faith is from the Lord. He who does not think according to this truth is not in the light (lux) of truth; but in a fatuous light (lumen), and this, in the light of heaven, is darkness; and as a result he cannot be enlightened in any other truths, except as concerns the memory only, but not as concerns perception, which is faith in its essence. * John v. 26. 30
    • NOS. r03-Ilr106 From these things it is evident that a man is only a form of charity, and that the charity is of the Lord with him; anu that it is given to the man as if he himself were the charity, to the end that he may become the receptacle of it, and so be in reciprocal conjunction, as from himself, though really from the L()rd.107 4. A man is a form of charity of stlch a quality as, with him, good of the will is conjoined to truths of the understanding. Everything of the will is called a good, and everything of the understanding a truth, because the will is in the heat of heaven, and the under­ standing in the light of heaven. And just as the will withOlt the understanding has not any quality, and so cannot be called anything, but takes on a quality and becomes something in the understand­ ing, and becomes of such and such a quality, or is something or other, according to what is in the understanding ;-so it is in the case of a good without truth, and a good with truth.loS Genuine truths should be learned therefore: with them the good of the will conjoins itself, and thus does the good of the will become the good of charity.109 It is in this way, that is, from the truths in the understanding, that every variety of charity origi­ nates; for a truth in its essence is a good, the truth being the form of the good, precisely as speech is the voices form. Let this be illustrated.110 There are two forms of the voice; the one of singing, the other of speech; likewise of the affec­ tion of truth from good, or of charity. Let these things be treated of. N .B.111 This being so, it is accordingly said that charity is the affection of truth from good, or the affection of spiritual truth. From this comes the affection of rational or moral truth, and the affection of civil or natural truth. 31
    • CHARITY112 It is in consequence of this that they who are in charity are in light, or, if they are not in it, that they love light. Light is truth and heat is good; and it is well known that all quickening and fructi­ fication is from good by means of truth; so also is spiritual quickening and fructification.113 Those who are not in charity, however, do not love truth in the light, but they are able to love truth in the shade; and this truth is what the truth of faith is at the present day, that is, that it ought to be believed to be true, although it is not seen to be so with the understanding. In this way, indeed, falsity may be called truth, and, from its confirma­ tion, may be called* truth; as is done.114 5. Whatever proceeds from such a man derives from that form that it is a likeness of it j thus it is charit.y. There are three things that proceed; there is thought, there is speech, and there is action. From a man who is a form of charity, there proceeds thought from the affection that is charity, speech from the voice which is of affection, and in which there is the affection of the thought, and action by means of a movement in which there is charity. This movement proceeds from effort; and the affection of the thought makes the effort. 115 The form of charity is first of all in his interior perception, which proceeds from the heat and light of the Spiritual. There, indeed, the man himself is a man. Out of that, charity is brought forth into the resulting or lower things; it both puts itself forth and brings itself into effect, scarcely other­ wise than as there is produced from a seed the shoot and, little by little, the tree, the tree becoming as it were a tree in permanent being; while its fruits are the good works that are done, from the • The MS. here reads" called" (vO<"ari) , but the context suggests that" believed" ((r~di) may have been intended. 32
    • NOS. II2-120 will of good through the understanding of truth, in the body. And so the tree first has existence.116 Its inmost form is like seed. It is well known that no other thing can spring from a seed than what is of that stock. 1t is the same with ail, though with much variation; but still both the twig and the branch with fruit on them, are recog­ nized as being from that tree.117 Whatever, therefore, a man does who inwardly is a charity, is from his charity, although his deeds and speech and thoughts are of unlimited variety. All the things he brings forth are as it were images of him under differing forms, in all which, however, there is a common form, as the plane out of which they are (ex quo).*118 For this reason it happens that, if only a mans ruling affection is known, then, when he is saying or doing anything, another recognizes from what purpose and from what love, as it were from what fountain, it springs. The Lord says that an evil tree bringeth forth evil fruit, and a good tree good fruit, and that an evil tree cannot bring forth good fruit. t119 A mans life is in everything he wills and thinks, in everything he says, and in everything he does. No one can carry out any action from life other than his own; all these things are effects of his life; and therefore there is the likeness.1:0 In the spiritual world all affections are imaged forth variously, as trees, gardens, birds, animals: in these, when inmostly inspected, there is seen to be an image of the man; they are representatives of him. • The following note is on the left·hand margin of the oriQ"inal MS. opposite nos. 117.122: There is a compassion of charity, a clemency of charity, a friendship of charity, a good-will of charity, a modesty of charity: in a word, all virtues are of charity, but they come under another name, and so under another category. t Matt. vii. 17, 18; Luke vi. 43. 33
    • CHARITY121 In a word, there is an image of the man in each and everyone of these things.122 6. The neighbour can be loved from what is not ­ charity; and yet this, regarded in itself, is not loving the neighbour. Let examples illustrate. An evil man can love a good man, and yet not in himself love good. Of a gentile, who says he will do his work faithfully because God so wills, one can say, ., This is a man an atheist can love." When anyone who does not love his country hears someone else speaking and knows that he does love his country, he can as it were love him for it. He listens to him, saying to himself, " He is good at heart; he speaks from love," paying heed to him. I have heard hundreds pay heed to a man reputed to love his country, and scarcely ten of them were men who loved their country. The same can be the case with anyone who, hearing a preacher, says that he speaks from God, out of zeal for their souls; and the-se who do not love God at all, and believe nothing, are affected all the same while hearing him, and they praise him, and love him, and send him gifts. Every sincere man is loved by some who are insin­ cere; every truthful man is loved by some liars; the faithful man by the unfaithful; the chaste man who loves his wife, by the unchaste; and so on. 12 3 However, this happens with everyone while paying attention in a general way; but as soon as general perception passes away, then the light passes away too. This takes place when he sub­ mits the matter to the observation of his lower thought, and considers whether it is so or not. Into this thought there inflows light from the man or the world, whereas into g-eneral thoug-ht there inflows light out of heaven. This light inflows into mans intellectual continually, if only he does not let hltnself down into his own light; for, if he is that kind of man, he then extinguishes the light of 34
    • NOS. 121-126 heaven. Al1 men have a general perception of truth; but the love of what is lower casts a man down precipitately into perception from the pro- prium. This perception is a material one, communicating with the sight of the eye. It is phantasy or imagination.124 7. He loves the neighbour, who does so from the charity in himself. He conjoins himself with his neighbours good and not with his person; and therefore, if the person departs from good, he does not love him. This conjunction, however, is a spiritual conjunc- tion, because the neighbour, in a spiritual idea, is good.125 Consequently, for a man to love the neighbour, he must be a charity in form. [VI)136 A MAN IS BORN TO THE END THAT HE MAY BECOME A CHARITY; BUT HE CANNOT BECOME A CHARITY UNLESS HE CONSTANTLY D O ~ GOOD OF USI;;. TO THE NEIGHBOUR FROM AFFEC- TION AND DELIGHT. General explanation in this order: (I) The general good exists from the goods of use the individuals each perform; and the goods of use they each perform subsist from the general good. (2) Mitz-tsJri1ts..,..jJmctions, offices, and various emploY-f!1-enjs are the goods of use the individuals each perform, from which tht general good exists. (3) All the ofli.-ge~ and employments in a king- dom, commonwealth, or community, re- garded as to the goods of use, make a form which corresponds to the heavenly form. 35
    • CHARITY (4) They also make a form which corresponds to the human form. (5) In this form, each one is a good of use in accordance with the scope of his offlce or empl£yment. *127 I. The general good exists from the goods of use the individuals each perform; and the goods of use they each perform subsist from the general good. They are termed goods of use because all the goods which are of love towards the neighbour, or of charity, are uses, and all uses are goods, and therefore are named in one term, goods of use. They are also called fruits of use.128 It is well known that every man is born, to_per­ form uses, and that he does perform uses to others. He who aoes not is, indeed, called a useless _I!l~!l­ ber, and rejected: he who performs uses to himself alone is also a useless member, although not so called. In a well constituted commonwealth, there­ fore, provision is made that no one shall be us~­ less: if anyone is useless, he is driven to some Q.r~; even a beggar is, if he is healthy. ­12 9 Infants and children, so long as they are under nurses and masters, are not, indeed, performing goods of use, but yet they are learning to perform them, and should have them for an end. Then the good of ,use is in the end. For a house to be built, the materials must first be obtained, and the foun­ dation laid, and the walls erected; and so finally the house is inhabited. The good of a house is the dwelling in it. 13 0 The general good consists of these things: That in a society or kingdom there should be * Sections 4 and 5 represent in each case the Authors second version, as shown by crossed out passages in the MS. A sixth section, which has been scored out, is sub· stantially the same as the heading of chapter VII, page 42. 36
    • NOS. 127-133 I. What is Q.iYiII.e among them. 2. What is j~ among them. 3. What is moral among them. 4. Diligence, skill, and uprighTne~_s among them. S. The necessa.£.ies for life. 6. The necessaries for all kinds of ViQL.k. 7. The necessaries for P.!Q.~~I;..­ tJ9J1. 8. Sufficient wealth, because these three kinds of necessaries are procured with it.13 1 The general good is from these things, coming not from the things themselves, but from each of the individuals there, and through the goods of use which they each perJorm; as what is Divine is indeed there by means of ministers, and what is just by means of governors and juuges; as what is moral is there by means of what is Divine and what is just; and as necessaries are there by means of all kinds of work and commerce; and so on.132 It is well known that every g-eneral is constituted of particulars. That is why it is called a general. Such, therefore, as the parts are, such is the general. A garden in general is of such a quality as are its trees and their fruits; meadows in general are of such a quality as are their crops; fields in general are of such a quality as their seed and its herbs and flowers; a ship in general is of such a quality as all its parts, which are several. The order among the parts, and the quality of the parts, causes the general to be more perfect or more imperfect. 133 That the goods of use which individuals each perform subsist from the general good, is well known; for each one derives his_ own good of use from the general. All things necessary for life, industries, and protection, and the wealth by which these necessaries are obtained, are from this; for by a general is meant not only a com­ munity and its society, but a whole region, and also a kingdom. But as these subjects are very extensive, they will be more clearly set forth in 37
    • CHARITY what follows; for there are many varieties, which however always agree with this law.134 2. Ministries, functions, offices, and various occupations are the goods of use the individuals each perform, from which the general good exists. By ministries are meant the activities of the priesthood and the duties connected with them; by functions are meant various civil positions j and by employments are meant occupations like those of the several kinds of craftsmen; by offices are meant various professions, businesses, and positions of service. Of these four the commonwealth, or society, consists.135 Those who are in ministries are responsible for what is Divine being there j the functions of those in the various civil positions for what is just being there, and also what is moral, as well as diligence, skill, and uprightness; the various workmen for the necessaries for life, and business men for the necessaries for all kinds of work; soldiers, for pro­ tection; and this last especially to ensure sufficient wealth; also farmers.136 Everyone may know that the general good is in accordance with the goods of every kind, the industries, the pursuits.137 3. All the offices and employments, regarded as to the goods of use, make a form which corre­ sponds to the heavenly form. The heavenly form is such that everyone there is in some ministry, some function, in some office or employment, and in some work. All heavenly societies are such that no one there is useless. He who does no work, wanting to live in idleness, or only to talk, walk about, and sleep, is not tolerated there. All things there are so ordered that they are allotted a place nearer or further from the centre, in accordance with their use. The nearer to the centre, the more magnificent are the palaces; the further from the centre, the less magnificent 38
    • NOS. 134-142 are they. They are different in the east, the west, the south, and the north. Everyone, on coming into a society, is initiated into his occupation, and is allotted a house corresponding to his work. Every society is a series of affections, in the order of the heavens.138 Everyone there is delighted with his own pur- suit; it is the source of his delight. They shun idleness as one would a plague. The reason is this, that everyone there does his work as from the love of use, and so has heart-felt delights; the love of use inflows out ot the general body into him. From a heavenly society, in the first instance, it was given me to know that not only do the indi­ viduals, disposed in accordance with the varieties of their affections, make the general good, but that everyone derives his own good from the general good.139 So it is on earth; for in this way an earthly society corresponds to a heavenly society; and when it corresponds, then what is Divine is there, what is just is there, what is moral and upright is there, good sense is there, diligence is there. The general inspires these things into each of the parts, when the part, which is an angel, is in charity.140 The necessaries for life and for all kinds of work, and also riches, and especially enjoyment and happinest>, are given to him out of the general body, in the measure that he is a charity.141 .But people do not know this on earth, where everyone places delight and good fortune in honours and wealth. Those who do so on earth become mean and poor, and carry on an existence in the hells; while he who applies himself to some oce.-u.pation from an affection of charity, comes into a heavenly society.142 In a heavenly society there are functions, offices, and occupations innumerable, all spiritual, which 39
    • CHARITY might indeed be described, but not so as to be apprehended.143 4. They also make a form which corresponds to the human form. It is similar in the human body. There, all the parts are goods of use in a most perfect form. And as they are in a most perfect form, they are felt as a one; nevertheless they are all different, and iri each of these there are different things in their own series and their own order. There are the five organs of sense, the several viscera, the organs of generation, several in each sex; there are the external members; there are still more things of the mind, that is, of the will and the understanding.IH The general things in the body are the heart and the lungs. Their actions inflow into all parts of the body, organs, viscera, and members. In the mind, it is the will and the understanding that are the general things. The general things there look to the individual things as their parts from which it subsists; and the general looks to the parts from which it exists.*145 All things there are formed from use, in use, and for use; they are all forms of use.146 In the living (animali) body the form of govern­ ment is such that anyone part draws its portion from the general, and it takes care that the general gives to the part, so that it may subsist. The heart gives blood to each of the parts throughout the body; and any one of these. as it has need of it, takes what suits it, and surrenders somethiflg from its own store. In a word, the form is a wonderful one: * There is a crossing out in this sentence, from which a confusion has arisen. Possibly Swedenborg meant to write, "The general things there look to the individual things as their parts from which they exist, and the parts look to the general from which they subsist," which would agree with what is said elsewhere. 40
    • NOS. 143-152147 There is the heavenly form of use in it; as is confirmed by the fact that anyone heavenly society is like a man; moreover, it appears like a man. The uses there make that man, because the form of a heavenly society corresponds to the form of the living (animalis) body in respect of its uses.148 The heavenly form is, in the least things and in the greatest things, a man; consequently the entire heaven is a Man, every society is a man, each individual angel is a man. This is because the Lord, from whom is heaven, is Man.*149 S. In this form, each one is a good of use in accordance with the scope of his office or employ­ ment. Charity is nothing else than the affection of truth from good, and the affection of truth from good is the affection of use. For unless the affec­ tion of truth from good is brought into act, it perishes; and an act therefrom is a use.150 Genuine truth, the affection of which is charity, looks to nothing- else than life with the neigh­ bour; and therefore, the affection of truth from good is nothing else. The good from which this affection is, is a desiring to do, and a desiring to know for the sake of doing; otherwise it is not the genuine good from which truth is.15 1 When, therefore, a man is a use, or a good of use, he is also a charity.152 And when that is the case, the man is said to be a charity in form; indeed he is an image of it. All things in that man are of charity j for when the man himself is, in general, breathing forth use, he is doing so in every particular as well. His life and his soul become a love of use, or an affection of use. • * In the MS. here, following a crossed out draft of sub­ section 5, there is the statement, "Man is a form of heaven ..." An examination of the MS. shows that most probably it sbduld have been deleted. 41
    • CHARITY153 And then the man is looking inwardly to the Lord, and outwardly to his work.154 6. A mam is born to the end that he may become a charity; but he cannot become a charity unless he constantly does the goods of use to the neigh­ hour from affection and its delight. In the following article it will be stated how a man is to do the good of use constantly to the neighbour, and this from affection and its delight.155 He who places charity in good deeds alone cannot do this constantly.15 6 And unless constant uses are done, a break in the continuity is brought about; and during thit> interval he may turn aside to all loves and the lustings therefrom, and thus not only be discontinu­ ing his charity, but also get drawn away from uses. In this way the charity perishes, by reason of its opposites; and he serves two masters.*157 It is possible, indeed, for a man to do the good of use from an affection of glory, honour, and gain, and from the delights of these; but in that case he is not a charity, but a lusting; thus he is not a form of heaven, but a form of hell. Even in hell everyone is compelled to do good work; but not from an affection of it; he is compelled to do it. VII15 8 EVERY MAN WHO LOOKS TO THE LORD AND SHUNS EVILS AS SINS BECOMES A FORM OF CHARITY, PROVIDED THAT HE HONESTLY, JUSTLY, AND FAITHFULLY CARRIES OUT T..IiE WORK OF HIS OCCUPATION OR EMPLOYMENT. This follows as consequent upon the preceding law, that man is born in order to become a charity, * Matt. vi. 24; Luke xvi. 13. 42
    • NOS. 153-160 and he cannot become a charity unless he con- stantly does the good of use from affection and delight. When, therefore, a man honestly, justly, and faithfully, carries out the work of his occupa- tion or employment from affection and its delight, he is continually in the good of use, not only towards the community or state, but also towards particular sections thereof and towards private individuals. But he cannot do this unless he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins; for, as shown above, the " first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and the " second" of charity is to do goods [no. 40]. Moreover, the goods he does are the goods of use he is doing every day; and when he is not doing them, he has it in mind to do them. There is an interior affec- tion abiding inwardly, and desiring it. It is owing to this that, all the time, from morning to evening, from year to year, from his earliest age to the end of his life, he is in the good of use. He cannot otherwise become a form of charity, that is, a receptacle of it.159 Something shall now be said concerning charity in the case of the priest, the governor, and the officials under them; the judge, the commander of an army, and the officers under him; the common soldier; the business man, the workman, the farmer, the ships captain and the sailor, and ser- vants.~ If he looksthe caseLord and shuns evils as sins, Charity in to the of the Priest. and honestly, justly, and faithfully does the work of the ministry he is charged with, he is doing a good of use continually, and becomes a charity in form. But he does this good of use or the work of the ministry honestl~juSt1y--;-and faithfully, when it is the salvation of souls that affects him; aiidiil proportion as this affects him, ti1:itllsatfect him, because by them he is to lead souls to heaven; and 43
    • CHARITY he is leading souls to heaven by means of truths when he leads them to the Lord. His love is then diligently to teach truths from the Word, because when he teaches them from the Word he is teach­ ing them from the Lord. For the Lord not only is the Word (John i. I, 2, 14), but He is also the Way, the Truth, and the Life (John xiv. 6), and He is the Door. He, therefore, who enters into the sheepfold throug-h the Lord as the door, is a good shepherd; but he who does not enter into t~e sheEl­ fold through the Lord as the door, is a bad shep­ herd, who is called a thief and a robber (John x. 1-9).•6. Charity in the case of Governors. By governors are meant those holding the highest positions in kingdoms, commonwealths, provinces, cities, societies, over which they have jurisdiction in civil affairs. Each one of them in his own position, if he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, and if he honestly, justly, and faith­ fully carries out the work of his exalted function, is continually doing a good of use to the com­ munity and to the individuals in it, and becomes a charity in form. And this takes place when the good of the subjects or citizens affects him; and when this affects him, it moves him-to enact, to­ gether with those who are wise and God-fearing, laws of use, to see that they are kept, and to be first in living subject to them; also, to appoint over the groups of people under him officials, who are intelligent and at the same time of good will, through whom, under his supervision, judgment and justice may prevail, and the general good always be promoted. He will regard himself as the highest in rank of those serving others, and not as the head, for the head directs all things of its body from love and wisdom in itself; and Love and Wisdom in itself is the only Lord, by whom he, too, as a servant, will be directed. M
    • NOS. 161-16316:1 Charity in the case of 0 ffi.cials under them. By officials under governors are meant those who are appointed by them over groups of the people to fulfil various necessary and useful functions. Each one of them, if he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, and if he honestly, justly, and faithfully carries out the work of his office, be­ comes a charity in form, because he is doing goods of use continually, while at work, and also when not at work; for then an affection for doing them becomes established in his mind (animus), and the affectLon for doing the goods of use is charity in its life. What affects him is the use, and not the honour, except for the sake of the use. Under every official there is, in accordance with the scope of his jurisdiction, a sort of lesser general good subordinate to the greater and greatest general good, which is that of the kingdom or republic. When an official who is a charity is doing his own work honestly, justly, and faithfully, he is taking thought for the lesser general good which is that of his contribution, and in this way he is taking thought for the greater, and the greatest, general good. Moreover, it is the same with the official as with the governor already treated of, the only difference being that which exists between what is greater and what is less, what is wide and what is narrow, what is extended to uses in a general way, and what is extended to them in a particular way. In addition, the one kind of extension is dependent on the other, as a retinue of servants is dependent.163 Charity in the case of Judges. If they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and if they deliver judgments of justice, they be­ come charities in form, because they are doing goods of use both to the community· and to the individuals in it, thus to the neighbour. And they are doing them continually while executing judgment, and also when not doing so, because they think E ~
    • CHARITY from what is just, they speak from what is just, and they act from what is just; for what is just is of their affection; and, in a spiritual sense, is the neighbour. He executes judgment on all from what is just, and at the same time impartially; for these cannot be separated. Indeed he is then executing judgment in accordance with the law, for every law has these two principles for its end; and so, when a cunning man tries to pervert the meaning of the law, he dismisses the suit. In coming fo a judgment he considers it to be a sin to have regard to friendship, or a bribe, or relationship, or auth­ ority, or any advantage other than that everyone who lives according to the laws shall be protected; and a sin if, when pronouncing a just judgment, the justice is not in the first place [with him], but in the second. The judgments of a just judge are all judgments of charity, even when he inflicts a fine or a penalty on the guilty evil; for in this way he ,is amending them, and guarding against their doing harm to other guiltless people, who are the neighbour; for he is like a father who, if he loves his children, corrects them when they do wrong.16 4 Charity in the case of the Commander of an Army. By the commander of an army is meant its highest offic~r, whether he is the king or the arc}): duke, or a commander appointed by either of them, who is holding the command-in-chief. If he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, and if he acts honestly, justly, and faithfully in the affairs of his generalship and command, he is doing the goods of use that are goods of charity. And because he is constantly meditating upon them, applying- him­ self to them, and carrying them into effect, he be­ C9mes a charity. If he is the king or the archduke, he does not love war, but peace, and continues to love it during war. He only goes to war for th.e protectiop of his country, and thus he is not an 46
    • NOS. r64, r65 aggressor but a defender; afterwards, indeed, when war has been commenced, he also is an aggressor, so long as aggression is defence. In battle, unless by birth he is of another nature, he is brave and active; after battle, mild and merciful. In battle he would fain be a lion; but after battle, a lamb. Inwardly in himself he does not exult in the slaughter of the enemy and the honour of vic­ tory, but in the deliverance of his country and his own people from hostile invasion and the resulting ruin and destruction. He acts prudently, he faith­ fully looks after his army as the father of a family looks after his children and servants, he loves each Qne of them according as he does his work honestly and actively; besides several like things. Cunning is not cnnning with him, but prudence.165 Charity in the case of Officers under the Com­ mander of an Army. They can each one become a charity, that is, an angel of heaven, if they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and carry out the duties of their com­ mand honestly, justly, and faithfully. For in this way they, too, are constantly doing the goods of use that are of charity; for their minds are in them, and when the mind is constantly in goods of use, it bp.comes a form of charity. For each one, his country is the neighbour; in a spiritu(ll idea he is the protection of it, ami its security from invasion and. destruction. He is not triumphant with false claims of what he has not merited; nor is he triumphant over what he has merited: he think~the latter.is-h.i..Ldl.iJy, and this makes him contented in spirit and not boastful. In war he loves the- soldiers under him, according to their activity, honesty, and obedience; he 190k~ _aft~r them, and wishes well to them as to himself, they being victims in the glory he has from his use. For officers can have a glory from their use and a glory from their rank. Those who are charities 47
    • CHARITY have a glory from their us~, but not from their rank. The other things in his case are similar to those in the case of the commander of an army, already treated of, differing only in accordance with the extent of his command. I have seen such officers in a higher heaven; and I have seen officers who were not such, in hell.166 Charity in the case of the Common Soldier. If he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, and does his duty honestly, justly, and faithfully, he also becomes a charity; there being in this respect no distinction of persons. For he is averse to unjust plunderings ; he detests unjust bloodshed. In battle it is another thing: then he is not averse to it, for then he does not think of it, but of the enemy as an enemy, who desires his blood. His fury dies away when he hears the sound of the drum calling him to cease from the slaughter. After victory he looks upon the prisoners as the neighbour according to the quality of their good. Before battle he raises his mind (animus) to the Lord, and commends his life into His hand; and after having done this, he brings his mind (animus) down again from its elevation into the body, and becomes brave; while in his mind (animus) above his bravery the thought of the Lord continues to abide, though he is not then aware of it. And then if he dies, he dies in the Lord; if he lives, he lives in the Lord.167 Charity in the case of the Business Man. If he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, and carries on his business honestly, justly, and faithfully, he becomes a charity. He acts with prudence of his own, as it were, though trusting all the while in Divine Providence; consequently he is not depressed in misfortunes, nor is he filled with pride in successes. He thinks of the morrow, and yet he does not think of it. He thinks of what will have to be done on the morrow, and how it 48
    • NOS. r66--r68 should be done; yet he does not think of the morrow, because he attributes the future to Divine Providence and not to his own prudence: even his own prudence he attributes to Divine Providence. He loves transacting business as the principal part of his occupation, and loves money as the instru­ ment of it; and he does not make the money the principal thing, and the business the instrumental, as the majority of the Jews do. Thus he loves the work, which is in itself a good of use, and does not love the means more than the work. He does not indeed make th is distinction, but they are neverthe­ less so distinguished when he looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins. For he shuns avarice, which is an evil, and the root of more evils. He loves the general good while loving his own good; for in this the general good lies, as the root of a tree hiding itself underground, out of which, never­ theless, the tree grows, and blossoms and bears fruit. Not that he gives the general good more, out of his own, than is due; but because the public good is also his fellow-citizens good having its existence from the latter, and he loves his fellow­ citizens from the charity of which he is a form. No one can know the hidden things of charity in himself, because he does not see them: but the Lord sees them.168 _Cham). il). tl].e case of Workmen. By workmen are meant labourers and artisans of various kinds. These, if they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and if they do their work honestly, justly, and faithfully, become forms of charity, each one according as he loves his work, and applies himself to it. For the things they have to do are goods of use, of service to the neighbour for various necessities and utilities, such as food, clothing, habitation, protection, preservation, en­ joyment, and several other things; they are also of advantage to the commonwealth. Every work­ 49
    • CHARITY man, according as he puts his mind to his work and labour, from the love of it, is, in respect of affection and thought about it, in it; and to the extent that he is in it, he is kept. from thinking and loving vanities, and so may be led by the Lord to the thinking and loving of goods, and also to the thinking and loving of the means to good, which are truths. The case is otherwise with a man who is not intent upon any work. Every workman who looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, shuns idleness, because it is the devils couch; he shuns dishonesty and fraud; he shuns luxury and intem­ perance. He is industrious, honest, sober, content with his lot, and does his work for the neighbour as for himself, because in doing it he is loving himself and him in equal degree.16<} Charity in the case of Farmers. Farmers, that is, husbandmen and vinedressers, if they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and do their work honestly, justly, and faithful1y, be_­ come charities in respect of their spirits, and after death, when they become spirits, they are in a form of charity; and that form is a human form, in which latter form al1 are after death. Such farmers rise early in the morning, arrange their work, devote themselves wholeheartedly to their tasks, are unwearied at work, and cheerful as a result of it. After work they are thrifty, sober, and alert. At home with their families they act according to what is just; outside with others, according to what is honest. They regard the civil laws of jus­ tice, such as those of the Decalogue, as Divine, and obey them. They love their fields and vine­ yards, because of their crops; and they love the crops because they are blessings, and give thanks to the Lord for them, and so they are continual1y looking to the Lord. 170 Charity in the case of Ship-captains. Ship-eaptains, either entrusted with ships and 50
    • NOS. 169-171 the merchandise therein, or owning them, also be- come charities if they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and do their work honestly, justly, and faithfully. Their work is a greater good of use than many others, because by means of it there is effected a communication and as it were a con- junction of the whole globe with its parts, and. of the parts with the whole. And this important work becomes a good of use, which is a good of charity in them, when they act prudently ,to the best of their knowledge, when, keeping watchful and sober, they carry out their duties assiduously, so that the voyage may be successful, do not rashly expose themselves to dangers, nor lose hope when they encounter unforeseen dangers, and afterwards when they have reached safety, they render praise and thanks to the Lord. They are just and honest in their dealings with the sailors, faithful towards the owners of the ship, and just in their deallngs with the foreigners at whose port their ship calls. They have nothing to do with pirates; they are content with their pay, and with any gains over and above it that are lawful. Because seafaring men who are charities look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and do their work honestly, justly, and faithfully, they are more devout in their morning and evening prayers and hymns than those whose life is spent on the land, for they trust in Divine Providence more than these do. I counsel seafarers henceforth to pray to the Lord, because He is the God of heaven and earth and sea ... *17 1 Charity in the case of Sailors. Sailors also become charities if they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, while doing their work honestly, justly, and faithfully. For when they * In the MS. the end of this line and another line are partly torn away and partly indecipherable. The Scrip- ture references given are probably" Matt. xxviii. 18; John iii. 35, xvii. 2; Matt. xi. 27." as in H.D. 291. 51
    • CHARITY shun evils as sins they are shunning the devil, the devil being evil itself; and in that case they are accepted by the Lord; and the goods they then do they are doing from the Lord. And in no other way do they do goods continually than in the work they are called upon to do, which is seamanship. That work is a good work, because it is a good of use; and having love towards the neighbour, or charity, is nothing else than doing a good of use. Moreover, when they shun the devil and are accepted by the Lord, they do not commit the evils that are listed in the Decalogue; that is, they do not kill, they do not commit adultery, they do not steal, they do not bear false witness; for no one who loves the neighbour does these things. For anyone who hates the neighbour so much that he would like to kill him, is not loving him; anyone wanting to commit adultery with someone elses wife, is not loving the neighbour; anyone wanting to steal and plunder his goods, is not loving the neighbour; anyone who bears false witness against him, is not loving the neighbour; and so on. These are the evils that they who look to the Lord speci­ ally shun. Then, also, they are not afraid of death, because if they die, they die in the Lord, and come into heaven; and in heaven they all love one another like brothers or like companions, and render each other mutual services. I exhort sailors also, as I have just exhorted the ship-captain, to approach the Lord and pray to Him; for none otheris God of heaven, earth, and sea.17 2 Charity in the case of Servants. Servants, just the same as masters, become charities, that is, angels, when they look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, and carry out a ser­ vants tasks honestly, justly, and faithfully. Their tasks, which are the goods of charity proper to them, and never-ceasing, are, attending on their masters, wishing well to tl!.~, not speaking ill of 52
    • NOS. 172-174 them, carrying on in their absence as honestly as in their presence, and not scorning to serve: for everyone, in whatever position of responsibility he is, is obliged to serve; even a king ought to serve the Lord. And in so far as anyOne serves faith­ fully, he is loved and led by the Lord. And in the measure that anyone looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins, he serves freely and not under com­ pulsion. VIII -......~ (SIGNS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THE THINGS THAT . ARE OF WORSHIP. All the things that are of charity have reference rto looking to the Lord and shunning evils as sins, and doing the goods of use that are of anyones I~e. All the things of worshi0j)~er ~ external thing,s, and are !O:J.(ternal things either of the body orof the mind. The external things of the body are done by actions and words; and the external things of the mind are those done in will and thought that cohere with the external things3 of the body. External things of the body, that are of ~~!:J}p, ~!.e : I. Regularly attending places of worship; 2. Listening to sermons; 3. Singing devoutly, and saying prayers kneeling; 4. Partaking of the Sacrament of the Supper. Then at home: I. Say­ ing prayers morning and evening, also at dinners and suppers; 2. Talking with other people about charity and faith, and about God, heaven, eternal life, and salvation; 3. Also, in the case of priests, preaching, as well as teaching privately; 4. And for everyone, instructing children and servants in such matters; 5. Reading the Word, and books of instrur.tion and piety. ~
    • CHARITY175 E~C!,U ..hi.Dgs of the m~d, that are of worship, are: 1. Thinking and meditating about God, heaven, eternal life, and salvation; 2. Reflecting upon one~ thoughts and intentions, to see whether they are evil or good, and reflecting that the evil ones are from the devil, and the good ones from God; 3. Being averse, in ones mind, from talk about ungodly, obscene, and filthy things; 4. In addition to the thoughts there are also affections that reach a mans sight and feeling.17 6 These are termed external because they cohere with external things of the body, and make one with them.177 That such things are external things of worship, and that ~t~al things of worsfiip aresigns of charity will be seen-ill the following o-rder: ,-­ W Charity itself is in the Internal m~, and its sign is.iJLthLEx1.§J:n.a1. ~ (2) When charity is in the Internal man, and makes it, then all the things of worship that are done in the External a:re---its signs. (3) T-VQ:;ship in the External man, proceeding I from the charity in the Internal, appears before angels as a standard-bearer holding a banner; whereas worship in the External man, not proceeding from charity in the ) Internal, appears before angels as an actor holding a firebrand.1 78 1. Charity itself is in the Internal man, and its sign is in the External. That there is an Internal and an External man, is well known; and that the Internal man is said to be the spirit and the External the flesh, is also well known. For it is said, and by some people recognized, that the spirit and the flesh are at war. The spirit that fights with the flesh is the Internal man, which is charity. ­ ;,1,
    • NOS. 175-183179, The Intern~ man as it is cannot manifest itself clearly to a man except by means of the External. It manifests itself when it is at war with the ( External; especially does it do s~hena man e-;amines himself, and sees his <1~ils, and upon recognizing them confesses theIl} , and when he considers repenting, and then resists his evils, and sets about leading a new life.ISo, ~m~l!..~s not do these things, his Int~al-- man is evil; if he does them, hislnternal man is good.- For the Lord operates by means of th-e Internal man upon the External; and, because there is evil residing in the External, a conflict takeS place. For, to the External man, which is caI,led tI1eflesh, spirits from hell are admitted, who are called the devil, and the Lord with the man ~ a~t this devil, and, if the man also fight"sas frorrthimself, conquers; and in so far as the devil is overcome, room is made for goods from the Internal man to enter. So, step by step, the man becomes new, and is regenerated.If) Whatever the Internal man brings about and presents to sight and feeling in the External,_!§ t~rined a sigp. If there is charity in the Internal, it brings about the mans reflecting upon the evils in himself, and he then in fact recognizes and knows them, and so on. If he does not do this, his External is not a sign of chad!); and even if his External-is in worship and piety, this is not a sign of charity, being external charity without internal .::1 charity~hich is ng,t char~ty. ­~ By a sign IS meant an indicatio.J2Jilld testification that a thing .exists; for it marKS and signifies, and sOlii-dicates and testifies.~ There is no Internal without its sign and its indication. I.Lt~ere is~rity intneInt~rnal man 9r the spir!t, and it does notfightWltfithe External f IEan and its flesh, t~~rity peri~~s. -ftiSTike a fountain of pure water: if there is no outlet, it 55
    • CHARITY stagnates; and then eitheli its flow fails, or the water becomes foul through stagnation. Several confirmations of these things from the Word. [The next two pages of the original MS. are missing.] [IX184 BENEFACTIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THE GOODS WHICH A MAN WHO IS A CHARITY DOES, IN FREEDOM, OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF 1115 OCCUPATION.]18 5 4. No one is saved by means of these benefac­ tions, but by means of the charity out at which they aredone, and which therefore ~ these bene7iiCfiDnS: These benefactions are outside the man, and everyone is saved ac~ording to the quaITty of the goo.s!-..2-~.hari!y..l.!1jlim. Very many after death, who in the world had thought about their own (salvation, seeing then that they are alive, and hearing that heaven and hell do exist, make a great parade of having done good works, givento the poor, helped the needy, and made contribu­ tions to pious uses. But it is said to them: "From w,!lat ml?ti~ (origo) did you do those things? Did you shun evils as sins? Did you give them any consideration?" Some of them reply that they had faith. But it is said: " If you did not give any consideration to evils as sins in yourselves, how could you have faith? Faith and evil do not go together." So inquiry is made into 56
    • NOS. r84-r87 what their life had been in their occupation,) whether they had done the uses of their occupa­ ti.9n {or the sake of rellQ.~yn,~!ion, ~ gain, as the principal goods, thus for the sake of them­ selves, or whether they had done them for the sake of the neighbour. They reply that they have n1aae ~h 4istinction. To this the reply is made: " If you had .looked to God and shunned evils as sins, then these two things would be diS-) tinct of themselves, because the Lord distinguishes them "; and that in so far as they had not done this, they had acted from evil and not from good. Everyones very affection is communicated in the spiritual world, and its nature displayed; and such as he is in respect of his affection, such are all things proceeding from him. In this way he is led to the society where his affection is.186 If those who place charity ~ th~go~_d actions or good deeds they-do, have not charity in themselves, they are conjoining themselves in: teriorlywith the infernal and exteriorl) with the heavenly. But everyone is depri~orthe-exterior, and is left to his interior. x187 OBLIGATIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THOSE THINGS IT BEHOVES A MAN TO DO IN ADDITION TO THOSE SET FORTH ABOVE. Obligations of charity are the payment of tax~ for various necessities and uses in the common­ wealth, these taxes being imposed on the subjects and citizens: also payment of duties to the Cus­ toms: expenses and outlays for various household necessities and uses, as regards oneself, ones wife and children, men-servants, maid-servants, and ,IIorkmen: and, again, any expenses and outlays 57
    • CHARITY of their.s ; also any engagemen{s entered into which thereby become obligations. Besides these there are also civil obligations, namely those of subor­ dination, obedience, honour, and intercourse, which are to be termed obligations because it behoves- a man to fulfil them. But to enumerate them all in detail would fill a whole pag·e. The various obliga­ tions that the laws of the kingdom impose are called obligations of charity, because charity does them as a matter of obligation, and not out of good pleasure; and, because charity regards _th.e.1TI as uses, it does them honestly and willingly. With those who are in charity, the honesty and willing­ ness of charity are inwardly iIl...~v.~y. Qplig.a.tlon, though both the honesty and the willingness are in accordance with the uses to which they look forward in their obligations, and also in accord­ ance with what they know of the administering of the uses.188 With those, however, who are not in charity, those same obligations appear similar externally, but are not similar internally. For with them there is neither honesty nor willingness; and therefore, if they are not afraid of the laws, or if they can upon any pretext evade them, they defraud in their pay­ ments. With them, not only the things set forth above, but even the laws of justice, are obliga­ tions; for these they keep from fear of being pun­ ished and of losing renown, and on this account they are doing so because they are obliged J£, and not from a love of what is just, thus not from love of the neighbour. 58
    • NOS. r88, r89 XIIS<) THERE ARE DIVERSIONS OF CHARITY, WHICH ARE VARIOUS ENJOYMENTS AND PLEASURES OF THE BODILY SENSES, USEFUL FOR RECREATING THE MIND (animus). * Such diversions are social intercourse, with its discussions about various matters, public, private, and domestic; also walks with their views, delight- ful on account of the various beauties and splen- dours of palaces "and houses, of trees and flowers in gardens, woods, and fields, also of people, birds, and flocks; plays, moreover, of various kinds, presenting moral virtues, and turns of fortune from which something of Divine Providence shines out. These and similar things are for the sense of sight. Then, too, harmonics of music and of singing, that affect the mind (animus) according to their corre- spondence with affections; and besides these, seemly jests, that expand the mind (animus). These are for the sense of hearing. Furthermore, banquets, feasts, and meals, with the cheerfulness attending them; and in addition, indoor games played with dice, balls, or cards; dancing, too, at weddings and festive gatherings. These and similar things are diversions useful for recreating minds (animus). And in addition to these there are various kinds of manual work exercising the body and diverting the mind (animus) from its regular activities; then there is the reading of books containing opinions * Swedenborg uses two terms for "mind," mens and animus. Generally, the former is used for the higher level of the mind in which the will and understanding are rationally active, while the latter applies to the lower level in which desires and ideas in connection with the body and the world are active; but mens is occasionally used with a wider significance. Cl. n. 204. 59
    • CHARITY on history and philosophy which give delight, and the news in newspapers also.190 With everyone who is in some position or em­ ployment these are diversions. They may there­ fore be termed diversions of such positions or em­ ployments; but in point of fact they are diversions of the affections from which each one carries on his- employment. There is an affection in every employment, and it bends the mind (animus), [and] keeps the mind (mens) intent upon working or applying itself, and this latter mind, if not relaxed, becomes dulled, and its desire loses its keenness; just like salt when it loses its saltness and is con­ sequently without any savour or stimulus. It is also like a bent bow, which, unless it is unbent, loses the force it derives from its elasticity. It is precisely the same if the mind (mens) is kept a long time in the same ideas without any change; as is the case with the sight when only a single object or a single colour is looked at continuously; for the sight goes if anything black is looked at con­ tinuously, or anything red continuously, or any­ thing white continuously; as, for instance, if snow is looked at continuously, the sight goes; but it is enlivened by several colours, whether seen one after another or all at the same time. Every form gives delight on account of the diverse things in it; for instance a garland of different coloured roses beautifully arranged. That is why a rainbow is more pleasing than the light itself.19 1 When the mind (mens) has been continuously intent on any work, it longs for rest; and when resting it descends into the body, and there seeks its delights corresponding to the minds (mens) activities. It makes its choice in accordance with its interior state in the body. The interiors of the body derive their pleasurable things chiefly from sensations of sight, hearing, smell, taste, and touch, which pleasurable things are indeed 60
    • NOS. 190-193 derived from things without, but they never­ theless insinuate themselves into the individual parts of the body, vhich are lermet! members ant! viscera. From this and no other source are their enjoyments and pleasures. Each of the fibres, and each tissue of the fibres, each capillary vessel, and thence general vessels, ant! thus everything in the whole body draws its own delights, which the man then feels not individually but as a whole: they become as it were one general thing. As is the mind of the head in them, so are the delights, pure or impure, spiritual or natural, heavenly or infer­ nal; for inwardly in any of the bodys sensations there is his wills love with its affections, and the unuerstanding brings about a perception of the delights of these affections. For the wills love with its affections makes the life of each one, and from it the understandings perception makes sen­ sation; this is the origin of all delights and plea­ sures. For the body is a connected chain-like work, and a single form. Sensation communicates itself like a force applied to the separate links of a chain, and like a form made up of continuous chains.192 But as the ministries, functions, offices, and works of all keep their minds (mens) on the stretch, and it is these that are to be relaxed, revived, and recreated by the diversions, it can be seen that the diversions are various in accordance with the in­ terior affection in them; and that they are one thing if an affection of charity is in them, another thing if an affection for position only is in them, another if an affection for gain only is in them, another if done only for the sake of sustenance and the neces­ saries for living, another if only for the sake of a reputation, to become celebrated, another if only for what they earn, that they may increase their wealth, or that they may live in comfort; and so on.193 In those who have an affection of charity, all the F 61
    • CHARITY diversions set forth above serve it for recreation, even plays and games, as well as harmonies of music and singing, and all the beautiful things in fields and gardens, and social intercourse in general. The affection of use abides inwardly ip them, and, while thus resting, is gradually re­ newed. A desire for ones function breaks off or ends those things. For the Lord inflows from heaven into them and effects the renovation; and He also gives an interior sense of gratification in them, of which those who are not in an affection of charity know nothing. He breathes into them something as it were fragrant or sweet only per­ ceptible to oneself. It is said, fragrant, by which is meant spiritual pleasantness; and it is said, sweet, by which is meant spiritual delight. Plea­ santness is said of wisdom, and of the understand ­ ings perception therefrom; and delight (jucun­ dum) is said of love, and the wills affection there­ from. With those who are not in an affection of charity, these things are not present, because their spiritual mind is closed; and in so far as they recede from charity, their spiritual mind, in respect of the Voluntary, is as if all stuffed up with glue.194 - In those who only have an affection for position, those, that is, who do the work of their function o.nly for the sake of renown, so that they may -be praised and promoted, these diversions are similar externally. They work hard, they take pains over· their work, they do uses in abundance; not, how ­ ever from the love of use, but from the love of self, thus not from the love of the neighbour, but from the love of glory. They can even feel delight in the work of their function; but it is an infernal delight. This, in their view, may counterfeit heavenly delight, since both delights are alike externally. But their delight is full of undelightful things, for there is no rest of mind (animus) or peace for them except when they are thinking 02
    • NOS. 194, 195 about renown and position, or are being honoured and worshipped. When not thinking about these things, they throw themselves into sensuous plea­ sures, drunken bouts, luxuries, whoredoms, enmi­ ties, and acts of revenge, and slanders against their neighbours if they do not make libations in their ! honour. But gradually, if not raised into higher positions, they loathe their offices, and give them­ selves up to idleness, and become slothful; and when they have left this world they become demons.195 In those who only have an affection fo!.. gair;., these diversions are indeed diversions, but carnal ones, inspired within only by the delight of being wealthy. Such persons are diligent, prudent, indus­ trious, . especially when they are m~r£~s, and workmen. If they are officials, they take pains over the duties of their office, and sell the uses they do; if judges, they sell justice; if priests, they sell salva- ~I tion. To them, gainLs the neigh-hQlr. By virtue 01 J their office they love gain, and they love the gain derived from their office. Those who are in a high J" office ~ sell their COJlntrY, and also betray th-e army and citizens to its enemies. It is clear from all this what the quality of their love is in the diversions set forth above; these are full of rapine. Moreover, in so far as they are not afraid of the civil laws or public penalties, or afraid of losing the renown that brings them the desired gain, they j plunder and steal. Externally they are honest, but internally they are dishonest. The uses they do in their offic~~. and em2.IQY-.I!I~nts are enjoyable and ) pleasant to them as du.ng, is.to swine, or as mice are to cats. They lookupon other people as a tiger or a wolf looks upon lambs and sheep, which they devour if they can. As for the good of use, they do not know that it is anything. There is an infernalj delight and pleasantness in theircrrversions. They arellKe asses, nof seeing any pleasures in meadows 63
    • CHARITY and fields, except as something to feed upon, so long as there is wheat or barley in the ears. But these last things are said of the avaricious.196 In those, however, who perform their e!!!:ploy­ ments solely for the sake of sustenance and the necessaries for living; also in those who perform them solely for the sake of a reputation, to become celebrated; and in those who perform them solely for what they earn, to the end that they may grow rich, or that they may live in com­ fort, the diversions. set forth above are the only uses. They are corporeal and sensual men. Th~.r spirits are unclean, being lustings and appetites. They do the duties of their employment for the sake of the diversions. They are beast-men-dead ; and tduties are a burden to them. They look for substi­ /ltutes t do the work the ou ht tl? be doing; while they keep the reputation an t e earnings. When not engaged in the diversions enumerated above, they are idlers and sluggards; they lie abed thinking of nothing else but how to find com­ panions with whom to gossip, eat, and drink. They are a pub~ic burdt:n. All such people after death are shut up in workhouses, Yhere they are under an administrant judge, who daily appoints them the tasks they have to do; and if they do not do them they are given neither food, nor clothing, nor bed; and this goes on until they are driven to do something useful. The hells abound with such workhouses, about which [there may be] some­ thing at the end of this work. These workhouses stink; every grateful odour being from the life of spiritual love, or from the life of the love of use.197 The conjunction of charity and faith is dealt with in THE DOCTRINE OF THE NEW JERUSALEM CONCERN­ ING FAITH; also in the EXPLANATION OF THE APOCA­ LYPSE; as well as in ANGELIC WISDOM CONCERNING 64
    • NOS. 196-198 THE DIVINE PROVIDENCE; and in ANGELIC WISDOM CONCERNING THE DIVINE LOVE AND WISDOM.198 I n them everything has reference to these two: I. There cannot exist a grain of spiritual faith apart from charity, since charity is the life, soul, and essence of faith; 2. Such as the charity IS, such is the faith; and the faith that precedes charity is a faith of cognitions, which is historical faith, in itself a knowing. [Here ends the MS. of the first draft of the work. The following pages contain: I. A revised list of headings for a new draft. 2. Chapters I and II of the new draft. 3. Brief drafts of chapters XII and IV (on one page of the MS.). 4. The title of chapter Ill. See the EditQrial Note, page iii.] 65
    • CHARITY The sections in their series. I. THE .. F[RST " OF CHAR[TY [S TO LOOK TO THE LORD AND SHUN EV[L~ AS SINS. 11. THE" SECOND" OF CHARITY IS TO DO GOOD TO THE NEIGHBOUR. Ill. IN A NATURAL SENSE, THE NEIGHBOUR WHO IS TO BE LOVED IS A FELLOW CITIZEN, ALSO A SOCIETY, SMALL OR LARGE, ALSO ONES COUNTRY, ALSO THE HUMAN RACE. IV. THE NEIGHBOUR IS TO BE LOVED IN ACCORD­ ANCE WITH HIS SP[R[TUAL GOOD, AND H[S MORAL, CIVIL, AND NATURAL GOOD THERE­ FROM; CONSEQUENTLY IT [S GOOD THAT, IN A SPIRITUAL SENSE, IS THE NEIGHBOUR TO BE LOVED. V. EVERYONE LOVES THE NEIGHBOUR FROM THE GOOD OF CHARITY IN HIMSELF; CONSE ­ QUENTLY THE QUALITY OF ANYONES CHARITY IS SUCH AS THE CHARITY HE H[MSELF IS. VI. A MAN [S BORN TO THE END THAT HE MAY BECOME A CHARITY; BUT HE CANNOT BECOME A CHARITY UNLESS HE CONSTANTLY WILLS AND DOES THE GOOD OF CHARITY FROM AFFECTION AND ITS DELIGHT. * • [n the left· hand margin of the MS. opposite sectionsvi.-x. : " Enumerate the sins of which a man is not in theleast conscious if he does not search himself carefully, butwhich he either confirms with himself or does not reckonas sins, and which accordingly he does continually onaccount of the delights they yield from what is hereditary;from the Decalogue and from reason; up to 50 or a hun ­dred of them can be enumerated, the civil as well as thespiritual ones, etc." 66
    • THE SECTIONS IN THEIR SERIES VII. EVERY MAN, WHO LOOKS TO THE LORD AlD SHUNS EVILS AS SINS, BECOMES A CHARITY, IF HE HONESTLY, JUSTLY, AND FAITHFULLY CARRIES OUT TlIE WORK OF HIS 9CCUPATION OR EMPLOYMENT.VIII. SIGNS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THE THINGS THAT ARE OF WORSHIP. IX. BENEFACTIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THE GOODS THAT A MAN WHO IS A CHARITY DOES, IN FREEDOM, OUTSIDE THE SCOPE OF HIS OGCU~TIQN. X. OBLIGATIONS OF CHARITY ARE ALL THOSE THINGS IT BEHOVES A MAN TO DO IN ADDI- TION TO THOSE SET FORTH ABOVE. XI. THERE ARE DIVERSIOlS OF CHARITY, WHICH ARE VARIOUS ENJOYMENTS AND PLEASURES OF THE BODILY SENSES USEFUL FOR RECRE- ATING THE MIND. XII. VHERE THERE IS NO TRUTH OF FAITH, THE CHURCH DOES NOT EXIST, AND WHERE THERE IS NO GOOD OF CHARITY, RELIGION DOES NOT EXIST.*" * From an examination of the MS. it appears thatSwedenborg, after writing out the contents of the draftthat follows, altered the sections 1I, Ill, and IV to read asfollows: "11. The second of charity is to do uses to the neighbour. " Ill. In a natural sense, the neighbour to whom uses are to be done is a fellow citizen, also a society, small or large, also ones country, also the human race; and there are uses that are spiritual, and there are civil ones. c. IV. Uses are to be done to the neighbour in accor- dance with his spiritual good, and his moral, civil, and natural good therefrom."He also crossed off section XII, and inserted the followingover it: " Charity and faith make one." 67
    • CHARITY199 THE" FIRST" OF CHARITY IS TO LOOK TO THE LORD A~D SHUN EVILS AS S[1$. It is well known that charity, or love towards the neighbour, is doing good to others. But how one should do good, and to whom, so that the charity may be charity, will be uescribed in what follows. Everyone knows that no one can do good that is in itself good, except from Him who is Good Itself, or Goou in Himself, that is, except from God. Moreover, it is possible for everyone to know that, so long as a man is in evil, and thus, through that evil, in company with the devil, he can do no other good than impure goou, which outwardly has the appearance of being good, but inwardly is evil; which good is either pharisaical or done for reward. It will be necessary, there ­ fore, to say first what a man shoulu be, so that the good proceeding from him may be in itself good, thus the good of charity.*200 This, however, will be done in the following order: (I) No one can have charity except from the Lord. (2) No one can have charity from the Lord unless he shuns evils as sins. (3) A man ought to shun euils as sins, as from himself, while doing so neuerlheless from the Lord. (4) In so far as anyone does not shun evils as sins, he remains in them. * Swedenborg wrote the following note in the left-hand margin of the MS. opposite this paragraph: N.n.-From Paul respecting love towards the neighbour: If anyone asks which is first, to shun them as evils, or to love the neighbour. GB
    • NOS. I99-20I (5) In so far as anyone does not recognize and know what sins are, he sees no otherwise than that he is without sin. (6) In so far as anyone recognizes and knows what sins are, he can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord, and repent. (7) Good before repentance is not good, nor, before repentance, is charity charity. (8) Consequently, the rr first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, which is done by repentance.:101 As regards the FIRST, No one can have charity except from the Lord. Here, as in what follows, we name only the Lord, because the Lord is the only God; for He is God of heaven and earth, as He himself teaches . . .* He and the Father are one, like soul and body, as He also teaches . . . . t He and the Spirit are the same, like the Divine in Him, and the Divine from Him.! Thus He Himself is the One Only God; and thus the Divine Trinity is in His Person, and is named the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. Now, because the whole Church, and all religion, is founded upon the idea of God, and upon the idea that God is one, and because this idea exists to no purpose unless God is one in Essence and in Person, and unless this unity of the trinity and trinity of the unity is in the Lord alone, therefore here at the very beginning, and afterwards in what follows, we name the Lord only. See, besides, THE DOCTRINE OF THE NEW JERUSALEM COlCERNING THE LORD, from beginning to end; also ANGELIC WISDOM CONCERlI"G THE DIVINE PROVIDENCE, nos. [157, 262, 263J. § The * See Matt. xi 27; xxviii. 18: John iii. 35; xvii. 2. t See John x. 30, 38; xiv. 9-1 I; xvii. la. =:: See John xiv. 16-19; Matt. xxviii. 20. § The Author did not gi·e any nos. in the MS., evidently intending to supply them later. 69
    • CHARITYreason no one can have charity except from theLord, is that by charity is meant every good a mandoes to others; and the good a man does to othersis indeed good for those to whom it is done, but itis not good in him by whom it is done, unless it isfrom God. For no good that is in itself a good,and is called a good of charity, and in its essence isa spiritual good, can flow forth from man, butfrom the Lord only. For, in order that a good ofcharity, or a spiritual good, may exist, the Lordmust be in the Good, must indeed be the Good;for it proceeds from Him, and what proceeds fromanyone derives its essence from him; for He Him­self is in what is His Own. If, therefore, the Lordwere not the Good a man does to the neighbour,or, what is the same, unless the good a man doesto the neighbour were from the Lord, it would nothave an essence of good in it, but an essence ofevil, for the man would be in it; and a man inhimself and in his proprium is nothing but evil.This evil must first be removed, in order that thegood proceeding from the man may not be themans but the Lords. A man is only a recipientof life: he is not life in himself, for, if he were lifein himself, he would be God; and therefore, manis only a recipient of good, for good is of life,because love and wisdom are life, and good is oflove, and truth is of wisdom. This life cannot bemade over to man as his own; for man is finite andcreated, and the Lord cannot create and finite Him­self in another. In that case, He Himself wouldno longer exist, and then the entire human race,and each individual by himself, would be God. Tothink this is not only irrational, but abominablealso. In the spiritual world, such an idea aboutGod and man stinks like a corpse. From all thisit can be taken as established that there cannot beany good, which is in itself good, and is termeda good of charity, from man; it must be from the 70
    • NOS. 201, 202 Lord, who alone is Good itself, thus is in Himself Good. This, the Lord does, indeed, produce from Himself, but through man. There is no subject through which the Lord produces good from Him­ self, other than man. Nevertheless the Lord has given man the faculty of feeling it in himself, in­ deed, as from himself, and therefore as his own, to the end that he may do it. For if he felt it was not from himself, but from the Lord, he would not do it; for he would then believe himself to be not a man, not even alive, and at length scar~ely other­ wise than like an automaton. And, from experi­ ence, I know that a man would rather die, than live perceptibly from another in himself. Indeed, unless a man felt the good he does as being from himself, the good would not remain in him either, but would flow through, like water through a water-skin all full of holes; nor could he then be formed for heaven, that is, reformed and regen­ erated, and so, being saved, live to eternity. Lest, however, a man, owing to this appearance, should attribute to himself the good or charity he does to the neighbour, and thereby appropriate evil to himself, in place of good, through believing he lives from himself, and consequently does the good from himself, thus attributing to himself what is the Lords, it has pleased the Lord to reveal this in His Word, and to teach it. For the Lord says, " He that abideth in Me, and I in him, the same bringeth forth much fruit; for without Me ye can do nothing" (John xv. S, and else· where).202 2. No one can have charity from the Lord unles~ he shuns evils as sins. By charity, here as above, is meant the good a man does to the neighbour. Everyone is able to do good to the neighbour, an evil man as well as a good man; but no one is able to do it by reason of good in himself, except from the Lord, and 71
    • CHARITYunless he shuns evils as sins. That no one is ableto do good to the neighbour by reason of good inhimself, except from the Lord, has been shownjust above. The reason no one is able to do itunless he shuns evils as sins, is that the Lordcannot inflow into anyone with good so that it isreceived, unless the evils in him are removed; forevils do not receive good, they reject it. For it isthe same with a man who is in evils, as it is withdevils in hell. With devils, the Lord inflows withgood, in just the same way as He inflows withangels in heaven; but the devils do not receive it,they turn the good into evil, and the truth intofalsity, for their lifes form is such, and everythingthat inflows is turned into a likeness of the form;just as the pure heat of the sun is turned intoputrid and noisome smells when it inflows intourine that has been stagnant, into dung, and intocorpses. In the same way, the pure light of thesun, inflowing into objects in which all things aredisordered, is turned into hideous colours. It isthe same with heavenly heat, which is DivineGood, and heavenly light, which is Divine Truth,in the case of a man whose lifes form is inverted,and so is opposed to the heavenly form. Fromthis it is evident that, as long as a man is notshunning evils as sins, he cannot be doing other­wise than loving evils; and the love with everyonemakes the form of his life. It is comparatively likea bad tree, which receives heat and light from thesun just as a good tree does, but still can onlyproduce fruit that is a likeness of its own form, andtherefore bad. It is, too, comparatively like malig­nant and noxious plants, which derive from thesuns heat and light the life by which they grow,just the same as good and useful plants, and yetcan produce nothing but what agrees with theirown form. Every man is the form of his own love.Nothing else forms a man in respect of his spiritual 72
    • NO. 202part, but his love. If he loves evils, he becomesa form of evil, which is an infernal form; whereasif he loves goods, he becomes a form of good,which is a heavenly form. From this it is evidentthat unless a man shuns evils as sins, the form ofhis mind (mens) becomes, in respect of its spiritualthings, an infernal form, which in itself does notreceive any good from the Lord, and consequentlydoes not bring forth any good that is in itself good.The Lord can bring forth good through any man,and He can turn the evil that an evil man bringsforth into good. He can rouse an evil man to dogood from selfish and worldly considerations; butin that case the Lord does not inflow into the evilof the man himself, but round about it into thesurrounding things in him, thus into his external,by means of which the man wants to appear likea good man. That good, therefore, is good so faras the surface goes, but intrinsically is evil. Vithhypocrites, it is like gilded dung, so that scarcelyanyone thinks it to be other than pure gold; never­theless, if it is brought near to a sensitive nos­tril, the smell of the dung in it is perceived. These things, however, are fully shown in THE DOC­TRINE OF LIFE FOR THE NEW JERUSALEM, in thesection where it is shown that, in so far as aman shuns evils as sins, he does goods, not fromhimself, but from the Lord, nos. 18-31; towhich I will add only this, that everyone cansee this from merely general influx out of heaven.Take anyone you like, servant, farmer, workman,ship-captain, or merchant, provided only he hassomething- rational, and tell him only that he whohates evil does good, and all of them will see itclearly. And, inasmuch as they know that all goodis from God, tell them that, in so far as a manhates evil because it is against God, he does goodfrom God; and they will see it. But say the samethings to someone who has confirmed himself in 73
    • CHARITY faith alone, and accordingly at the same time in the idea that no one can do good from himself, and he will not see it ; for false things have closed his rational sight or understanding, but not that of the others.203 3. A man ought to shun evils as sins, as from himself, while doing so nevertheless from the Lord. Who, having read the Word, and having some religion, does not know that evils are sins? This is what the Word teaches from beginning to end, and this is the whole of religion. Evils are termed sins on account of their being contrary to the Word, and to religion. Who does not know that no one can shun evils as sins unless he does so as from himself? Who can repent any other way? Does not a man say within himself, " I wont do this. I will give up doing this. Indeed, when it recurs, I will fight against it and overcome it "? No one ever speaks in this way within himself, however, unless he believes in God. He who does not believe in God does not reckon an evil as a sin, and so does not fight against it, but rather in favour of it. But he who believes in God says also within himself, " With Gods help I will overcome it " ; and so he makes supplication, and gets help. This is not denied to anvone. but is given to him, because the Lord, from His Divine Love, is in the continual endeavour to reform and regenerate man, and so to purify him from evils. and this constant endeavour of the Lord comes into effect, when the man truly desires it, and makes an effort for it. In this and no other way does a man receive the power to resist evils and to fight against them. Before this, he does not receive it, he rejects it. This. then. is shunning evils as sins as from oneself, while doing so nevertheless from the Lord. But on this sub­ ject, THE DOCTRINE OF LIFE FOR THE NEW JERU­ SALEM, nos. 101-107, may also be seen; to which I will add this: Say to a man of sound reason, 740
    • NOS. 2°3, 204 "Only believe that Christ, the Son of God, redeemed you from hell, and thus from all evil, and beseech God the Father to forgive you your sins on that account, and He will do so; and in that case there will be no need for vou, as of yourself, to shun evils as sins. You ca~t do any- thing of yourself, can you? What is as of your- self, then? " And picking up a pebble, or a little bit of wood, tell him, " Are you any more able to do anything towards justification and salvation than this pebble, or little bit of wood?" Then the man of some reason will reply, ,. I know I can do nothing of myself, but all the same I should repent of evils. This, the Lord Himself taught: His apostles taught it: Paul taught it: the Word teaches it, and so does all Religion. When I practise repentance, shall I not be doing something as of myself?" Suppose you then say. " iVhat will you be doing, seeing you can do nothing? Do it if you like: I repent through faith, and faith saves without works." But the man of sound reason will reply, " You are mistaken, Sir. The Lord taught that I am both to do and to believe. For you, let it be faith; for me there shall be faith and works together. I know that after death a man will have to render an account of his works, and that everyones believing is according to his doing~ "204 4. In so far as anyone does not shun evils as sins, he remains in them. Man was created into the image and likeness of God, and made so that he might be a recipient of the Lords love and wisdom. But, because he did not want to be.a recipient, but wanted to be actual love and wisdom, and thus like God, he conse- quently inverted his form, and so turned away his affections and thoughts from the Lord to himself, and so began to love, even to worship, himself more than the Lord. In this way he estranged 75
    • CHARITYhimself from the Lord, and looked backwardsaway from Him, thereby perverting the image andlikeness of God in himself, and making it into animage and likeness of hell. This is signified by hiseating of the tree of the knowledge of good andevil. * By the serpent which he obeyed is signifiedthe sensual, which is the ultimate of the naturalman, and its lust. The sensual, because it existsin the world, and admits therefrom the objects itdesires, loves the things of the world; and, if it isallowed to rule, it draws the mind (mens) awayfrom the objects of heaven, which are goods oflove and truths of wisdom, in themselves Divine.This is the origin of man being, in respect of hisproprium, nothing but evil, and of his being borninto it from parents. But means have been pro ­vided by the Lord, so that he may not perish onaccount of this; and these are, to look to the Lordand acknowledge that every good of love andevery truth of wisdom is from Him, and nothingfrom man himself. In this way man inverts hisform, turning away from himself and turninground to the Lord; thus he returns to the stateinto which he was created, which was, as has beensaid, that he might be a recipient of good and truthfrom the Lord, not from himself at all. Mansproprium having, by this inversion, become evilonly, there is the other means of recovering theimage of God, shunning evils as sins. For if aman does not shun evils as sins, but only shunsthem as hurtful, he is still not looking to the Lord,but to himself, and so continues in a pervertedstate. V/hen, however, he shuns evils as sins, heis also shunning them because they are against the Lord and contrary to His Divine laws; and then hebeseeches the Lord for help and for power to resist them; and this power, when besought, is never • Gen. iii. 6. 76
    • NOS. 204. 205 denied. It is by these two means that a man is purified from his innate evils. Consequently, if he does not adopt these two means, he cannot but remain such as he was born. He cannot be purified from evils if he only looks to God and prays; for in that case he believes, after having prayed, either that he is entirely without sins, or that they have been remitted, by which he understands that they have been taken away. But in that case he still remains in them; and to remain in them is to increase them; for they are like a disease that eats away everything round about it and brings death. Nor are evils removed by only shunning them; for in that case the m<n is looking to himself, and he thereby strengthens the origin of evil, which was, that he turned himself backwards, away from the Lord, and round towards himself.205 S. In so far as anyone does not recognize and know what sins are, he sees no otherwise than that he is without sin. Every man loves his proprium, both the volun­ tary proprium and the intellectual. The voluntary proprium is evil, and the intellectual proprium is falsity from that evil, thus it is the falsity of evil. And because every man loves his proprium, he is thus loving the evil and its falsity; and, because everything that is loved is also delightful, therefore he knows no otherwise than that the evil he has is good, and that its falsity is truth; for that which is said to be good is all that which is delightful. From these things it can be seen at the outset that, if a man does not recognize and know what sins are, to that extent he sees no otherwise than that he is without sin. But, inasmuch as a man loves his own evil and its falsity, because he loves his proprium, he is not able from himself to know which thing is evil, and what thing is falsity from it; he has to see it from some other source. He must see it from the precepts of religion, all of G 77
    • CHARITYwhich have reference to the ten precepts of theDecalogue. If at heart he rejects these precepts, hecannot by any means see otherwise than that he iswithout sin; and in that case, having been initiatedfrom childhood into the worship of God, and beingaware from the Churchs teaching that he is asinner from his very origin and subsequent birth,he sets about confessing that he is a sinner; butnevertheless, being unaware of what sin is, hebelieves all the time that he is not a sinner. I haveheard people declaring that they were sinners, thatthey were in sins of every kind from conceptionand birth, that, from the head to the sole of thefoot, there was no soundness in them, and morethings of the same kind; but, because they did notknow what sin is, they did not know that the loveof self, and arrogance, are the heads of all sins.They did not know that bearing hatred and takingrevenge just becapse one is not honoured andworshipped as a demigod, is a sin; nor thatslandering the neighbour out of enmity, and thusbearing false witness against him, is a sin; northat deceiving anyone by word or deed, is a sin;that despising another in comparison with oneself,envying him his goods, being covetous of them,are sins. They did not know, either, that claimingmerit for performing the various acts of worshiptowards God, in matters both of faith and ofcharity, is a sin; besides innumerable other things.I have heard them say that they did not know suchthing·s were sins; nor anything, indeed, no matterwhat the nature of it, that one thinks but does notsay, or wills but does not duo On account of thisignorance one of them said he did not know he wasa sinner-Cl and if I am," he said, " I am purifiedfrom them when I have said this prayer, , I knownot my sins, 0 God, take them away." Butwhen the same person examined himself, whichtook place in the world of spirits, he noticed that 78
    • NOS. 205,206 his sins were so numerous that he could not tell them all. He saw, too, that he could, if he wanted to, recognize and know them. He said, however, that he did not want to, as he would then have to abstain from thinking and willing them, to do which would conflict with the delight of his life. From these things it is now evident that, in so far as anyone does not recognize and know what sins are, he sees no otherwise than that he is without sm.206 6. In so far as anyone recognizes and knows what sins are, he can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord, and repent of them. This follows as a result of all that has now been said. Therefore, in order that a man may see what sins are, the" first" of the Word was the Decalogue. For that reason also the Decalogue is a complex of all things of the Word. That is why it is called the Ten Vords, the Ten lords signifying all truths in the complex. For the same reason,. too, there are similar precepts among all nations in the universe with whom there is religion. Moreover, the man who knows that they are Divine laws, and that consequently anyone acting contrary to them is acting against God, or sinning, can receive Divine influx, and with that, too, a will or effort as of himself, that he would like to give up doing them and repent. The confession of ones sins before the Lord brings about conjunction with Him, and a reception of influx from Him; and then the Lord does it, while giving to the man to do it all the time as of himself. Otherwise the man would not do it. The Lord then operates through his inmost things right down to the outermost, and removes the lustings that are the roots of evil. This it is impossible for the man himself to do of himself. Of himself man acts upon the outer­ most things only, whereas it is the inmost things that make these. Therefore, if a man of himself 79
    • CHARITY were to remove the outermost things, the lustings would still remain.207 7. Good before repentance is not good, nor, before repentance, is charity charity. Before repentance a man is in evil; he is evil only, for he is a form of evil and an image of hell. By repentance, however, the evil is removed and good is implanted. From which it follows that the good before repentance is not good. Before repen­ tance the good is not done from the Lord, but from the man; and therefore it has not an essence of good but an essence of evil within it, however much in its form it appears outwardly as good. This is not recognized in the world, but it is after death, manifestly. It is heard in the very tone of his speech, and more, which evil there is in it, whether there is deceitfulness, enviousness, vainglorious­ ness, haughtiness, blasphemousness, or what is hypocritical, or even a desire for reward. All the words of his speech derive their tone from the evil that is in it and regards only itself. After repen­ tance, however, the good is quite a different thing. It is a full good, open from the Lord Himself. It is lovely, innocent, pleasing, heavenly. There is the Lord and heaven in it, there is good itself in it. It is alive; it is formed out of truths though being from good, in good, and towards good; it is nothing else but some use to the neigh­ bour; and hence it is serving. With every breath it puts away itself and its proprium, thus putting away evil. Its form is like the form of a lovely and beautifully coloured flower, shining out brilli­ antly under the suns rays. Consequently, too, in the case of those who are in good, they are forms N.B. that can never be comprehended by the natural man: they cannot be depicted, nor can they be described: the forms they have are forms of good. It is rightly said that they are forms of good j yet the form itself consists of truths, while its life is 80
    • NOS. 207, 208 the good of love; for the good sets the truths into a form suited to itself, and makes everyone of its truths living. This is what good after repentance is like.,08 8. Consequently, the (( first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils as sins, which is done by repentance. Who does not see that before a man can do good that is good, he must be cleansed from his evils? Doe.s not a cup have to be cleansed? And if it is not cleansed, does not the wine get a taste from its uncleanness? And does not a dish have to be cleansed before food is put on it? For if the inside of the dish is all unclean, will not the food excite aversion? How can anything pure inflow from heaven into a man,_ when he is wholly impure and unclean? Must not the impure and unclean things be removed first? If you let your bedroom get filled with excreta, would not the whole house have an offensive smell? Could anyone go into it? vVould not anyone going in say, " I cant," and would he not turn away from the house, saying, " Its only fit for swine"? Consequently, before the Lord can inflow with good, evil must be re- N.B. moved; for influx before that is dangerous, as the good is turned into evil and increases it. The first thing, therefore, is to remove evil, arid afterwards to inflow with good, and bring it into operation by means of the man. Anyone attempting to do good from the Lord, before evil has been removed by repentance, or without shunning evils as sins, is attempting what is impossible, and such things as may make him worse, inasmuch as, in the case of a wicked man, the good is turned into evil, and in that way it is profaned. That evil must be removed first, is clearly evident from the precepts of the Decalogue. Who is loving a person, when he wants to kill him, or hates him? Who is loving .B. the neighbour, when he commits whoredom with 81
    • CHARITY someone elses wife? Who is loving the neigh-N.B. bour, when he defrauds him? Who is loving the neighbour, when he slanders him? Who is loving the neighbour, when he covets what belongs to him? Those evils, therefore, must first be re­ moved; and in the measure that they are being removed, to that extent the neighbour is being loved. Paul speaks of these things thus: . . . *N.B. But people ask whether love towards the neigh­ bour should be first, or whether shunning thoseN .n. evils should be first. Everyone can see that shun­ ning those evils should be first, inasmuch as a man is born into evil. Is it not necessary then for him to repent? 11209 THE " SECOND " OF CHARITY IS TO DO GOOD TO THE NEIGHBOUR. Isaiah, chapter i. ; also concerning the cup and dish that are to be cleansed inside first. t If this cleansing is not done, they still appear good outwardly. This is Pharisaic or hypocritical good, or something natural in which there is noth­ ing spiritual, thus it is spurious good; and if done for the sake of salvation, it is good done for reward. But these things are to be illustrated in this order: (I) Not wishing to do evil to the neighbour, is loving him. • In the MS. no passage is quoted here; but the intended passage is possibly Rom. xiii. 10: "Love worketh no ill to his neighbour: love therefore is the fultilment of the law" (R.V.). t Matt. xxiii. 26; Luke xi. 39. 82
    • NOS. 209, 210 (2) Wishing to do good to the neighbour, is loving him. (3) I rt so far as a man does not wish to do evil to the neighbour, he wishes to do him good from charity; but not the reverse. (4) From this it follows, that the " first" of charity is to look to the Lord and shun evils as sins; and that the /( second" of charity is to do good to the neighbour.210 I. Not wishing to do evil to the neighbour, is loving him. For no one who loves another, does evil to him. Paul, too, says that he who loves the neighbour keeps the precepts of the Decalogue; he does not wish to kill; he does not wish to commit whoredom with someone elses wife; he does not wish to steal; he does not bear false witness; " therefore," he says, " fulfilling the law is what charity is. "* But, people ask; which is first, and which comes after? Whether loving the neighbour is first, and from that love not doing those evils; or whether re- moving them from oneself is first, and in that way loving the neighbour? It is evident enough that he who loves the neighbour does not do those evils. But people ask, how is anyone able to love the neighbour? Is he able to do so before he shuns those evils, and fights against them? It appears as if this love itself fights; and so it does, though not before the man is· in it. But, that he cannot come into that love, unless he first removes those evils, can be taken as established from the fact that every man by birth is in evils of every kind, that he lusts only after what is evil, and that, if he does not repent of them, he remains in them. Conse- quently those evils stand in the way of his being able to love the neighbour from that spiritual love. ~ Cf. Rom. xiii. la. 83
    • CHARITYAnd Paul, therefore, says also, that the flesh isagainst the spirit, and that the flesh with its lust ­ing must be crucified, * and that thus a man be ­comes spiritual, and a new creature. t From thisit may be seen that, in so far as a man crucifies theflesh, he lives in the spirit. Accordingly, manbeing such by birth, it follows that his spirit cannotlove the neighbour unless he crucifies his flesh,which is done by repentance; and that, in so far ashe does this, he loves the neighbour from the spirit,that is, inwardly; and that loving the neighbourfrom the heart, previous to this, is against mansnature. A belief has gathered strength in Christen­dom, that he who has faith loves the neighbour;but this belief is erroneous. No one can have afaith that has anything living in it, unless he shunsevils as sins, indeed, he has it to the extent that heshuns them. From these things it is now evidentthat the" first" of charity is not to do evil to theneighbour; for not doing evil to the neighbour isfighting against the evils in oneself, and repentingof them; and that the Usecond" of charity is todo good to the neighbour. I t is possible for any­one, from the principle that it is Christian not todo evil to the neighbour, actually not to do it; but he who, from that principle alone, does not do evil to the neighbour, and does good to him, is still not loving him. His not doing evil to him is out ofobedience to Divine law, not from the affection of love towards the neighbour. No one has any knowledge of this affection: he, however, who shuns evils as sins, that is, who does not love evils, comes into the affection of that love. Not doing evil but doing good from obedience is one thing, and not doing evil but good to the neighbour from an affection of love towards him is another. The * Cf. Gal. v. 16, 17, and 24, 25. t Cf. 2 Cor. v. 17; Gal. vi. 15; Eph. iv. 23, 24. 84
    • NO. 210~.B. difference is like that between the heat and light by night from the moon and stars, and the heat and light by day from the sun. In the obedience there is not any of the heat of that love, nor any of its light; but in the affection there is; for the affectionN.B.of love is heat. Consequently, they who have done good from obedience are in the lowest regions of heaven, and in a light and heat like that of the moon. Indeed, the light of their understanding is in the shade: they do not see any spiritual truths in light. The distinction between them, moreover, is that those who do good from obedience are doing it from fcar of punishment, and for the same reason also they abstain from doing evil; whereas those who do good from affection are not doing it fromN.B. fear of punishment; and, further, those who do good from obedience are natural, while those who do it from affection are spiritual. Again, those who do good from obedience are those who are being reformed-this, moreover, comes first;N.B. whereas those who do good from affection are being regenerated-this comes next in order. All who have been under the belief that man is saved by faith alone, if they are living in a Christian manner, confessing they are sinners, but without having examined themselves, do good from obedi­ ence, not from affection; indeed, they have no knowledge at all of faith, or of love, or of God, except what they hear from a preacher: they doN.B. good deeds, nevertheless. It is those who do good from obedience who take the lead in benefactions, such as giving to the poor, helping the needy, and endowing places of worship and hospitals; and they cannot but think that they merit reward in doing these things. Nor do they understand the -Vord as meaning anything else, where it is said that they shall have their reward. Nor do they know that the affection itself of good, with its delights, is the reward. 85
    • CHARITY211 The affection itself of love is like a flame, fromN.B. which there is light in truths. The reason for this is that the Lord inflows into a mans affee.~on, and ngives light. Moreover, IQYe, in.....!E~ spiritual w<?rld, JJappears from afar as a flame. Sometimes what look like flames descend from heaven, and these flames are affections of good and truth so appear-N.B.~. It is like someone-doingnomage to~g, a governor, or a person in authority, in accordance with the rules of rClnk, and thus outwardly loving him, without, however, inwardly loving him. He loves him because he sees in him XII212 WHERE THERE IS NO TRUTH OF FAITH, THE CHURCH DOES NOT EXIST j AND WHERE THERE IS N..Q...j}90D OF LIFE, RELIGION DOES NOT EXIST. The Church and religion make onc, like truth and good. And because truth is of faith and good is of charity, they make one as faith and charity do; and, in order that it may be still more clearly understood, they make one as do the understanding and the will. It is well known that it is possible for a man to understand well and all the while not will well, and to understand truths and thence give utterance to them, and yet not from willing them do them. But when he wills as he understands, and does as he says, then the will and the understand ­ ing with him make one. .It is similar in the case of the Church and religion. The Church is a Church from its doctrine; and religion is religion from a life in accordance with doctrine. And the doctrine ought to be composed of truths, and the life ought to be made up of goods. 86
    • NOS. 2II-21421 3 But, in order that these things may come into a clearer light, they must be explained in the fol1owing order: (I) All the truths of faith in the Church are from the Word. (2) The truths of faith that are from the Word teach what is to be believed and what is to be done, so that a mans lot may be eternal life. (3) It is said "the Church" on account of doctrine, and " religion" on account of a life in accordance therewith. (4) With those who, by both doctrine and life, , are in faith separate from charity, there is Iteither the Church nor religion. IV21 4 THE NEIGHBOUR IS TO BE LOVED IN ACCORD­ ANCE WITH HIS SPIRITUAL GOOD, AND HIS MORAL, CIVIL, AND NATURAL GOOD THERE­ FROM; CONSEQUENTLY IT IS GOOD THAT, IN A SPIRITUAL SENSE, IS THE NEIGHBOUR TO BE LOVED. (I) A man is not a man by reason of his face and body, but by reason of the good of his will. (2) When the good of a mans will is loved, the man himself is being loved. (3) A man is a man by reason of his spiritual good, and not by reason of his moral, civil, and natlLral good separate from spiritual good. (4) Such as a mans spiritual good is, such is his moral, civil, and natural good; because these three goods derive their life solely from spiritual good. 87
    • CHARITY (5) Consequently, it is good that, in a spiritual sense, is the neighbour to be loved. OBs.-Spiritual good is the good of charity, thus, the Lord, heaven, and the Church with him; for such is the man in the goods derived from it. III21 5 ~ A NATURAL .s~SE, THE NEIGHBOUR W!:!Q.IS TO BE LOVED IS A FELLOW-CITIZEN, ALSO A A SOCIETY, SMALL OR LARGE. ALSO O~S C~Y, ALSO THE HUMAN RACE. 88
    • REVISED READINGS OF THE LATIN TEXT A List of places where Translators readings of the MS.(Photolithograph copy) differ from those of Samuel H.Worcester In the American Latin Edition, New York,1906. References are to sections and lines of sections.The AmerIcan readings are in parentheses, and arefollowed immediately by present corrected readings. Paragraphi/serie. IV : last but two: (non seit homo(consequenter . . . bonum.) quid) nee seit quid. II. 5,deleted in MS. VII : I. 4: (ideo) ita. I1, 6. I. 6 :(charitas in forma.) charitas. (nam) num. Ill. 1, I. 4:Footnote: (Appendix . . . (quae apparel) quo dsunt) deleted in MS. Section appareat. Ill. 2. I. 6: I. subs. I. I. 7: (add it ex se) (famulitium) familiam. Ill,addit se. I, I, I. 12: (sese) 2, I. 7: Delete" ejus." Ill,se. I, 3, I. 11 : (si) etsi. I, 3. 2. I. 8: (Qui eligitur) QuiI. 14: (et ex illis) et illis. eorum eligitur. Ill. 2. I. 9 :I, 3, I. 18: (contemptus (similis) similiter. Ill, 2 I.aliorum) contemptus etiam 15: (nonne) annon. Ill, 4, aliorum. I, 3,1. 20 : (conferet) heading: (quod non unusconferat. 1,4, I. 13 : (animas) homo sit) quod non unusanimos. I, 4, I. 17: (aper­ homo non sit-first "non"tum) aperte. I, 5, I. 28: (fit) meant to be deleted. Ill, 4,sit. I1, 1. I. 5: (animarum) I. 5/6 from end; (et qui) est animorum. 11, I, I. 6: qui. Ill, 4, I. 5 .from end: (anima) animo. I1, 1, I. 20: (hie non est) hic est. IV, list (hoc) haec. 11, 2, I. 8: MS. of subsections, 4: (bonumhas " sunt," error for quod) bonum ejus quod. IV, le sint." 11, 3, I. 3/4: 1, I. 8: (aut) et. IV, 1, ((et face re bonum]) [et I. 18: (consimilis) similis.facere Christianum bonum]; IV, ~, I. 5 from end: (omnes)also (patet) pateat. II, 3, omlllS. IV, 2. I. 13: (ac) et.I. 8: (plura [sint mala]) IV, 3, I. 11: (sic) etiam. plura [fugienda sint]. I1, 3. IV. 3, I. 12: (ejus) eorum;I. 19: (malum velle facere) also (affectionis) [est forma]malum facere. 11, 3, last affectionis. IV. 3, I. 14: but one: "et" intended to (sistunt) sunt. IV, 4, I. 6 be deleted together with from end: (vitam etiam ut) le remo " that follows. Il, 4, vitam ut. V. title: deleted 89
    • REVISED READINGS OF THE LATIN TEXTin MS. V, 2, I. 8: suggested (influit commune in ilium.correction not good; per­ Sic ex) influit e communi inhaps "sapientia est for ilium. Ex. VI, 3, I. 26:" sapientia sunt," but plural (haec ibi. Divinum) tunc ibinot incorrect. V, 2, I. 6 Divinum. VI, 3, last two:from end: (ibi) illi. V, 3, (possunt sed non ita [ad]I. 9: (Et quia) At quia. V, captum) possent, sed non4, I. 8: (seu fit aliquid) seu ita captu. VI, 4, 1. 13:sit aliquid. V, 4, I. 19: (Haec ibi) Ibi. VI, 4,(agetur) agatur. V, 4, last I. 22: (indit) dedit. VII,but two: MS. reads "sit 1. 8: (spectet . . : fugiat)verum esse" (not "verum spectat . . . fugit. VII,est "). V, 4, last but I. IS: (perpetuo sit in bonoone: "vocari." Context usus, a) perpetuo a. VII,suggests " credi " may have 1. 16: (vitae) vitae, sit inbeen intended. V,S, I. 10: bono usus. VII, 1. 21 : (etiam(spirituali) spiritualis. V,S, apud) apud. VII, 2 I. 16:1. I I: (lbi ipse) lbi etiam (et sic non) et non. VII, 4,ipse. V,S, I. 18: (quam 1. 6: (ex justo; loquunturquod) quam etiam quod. etiam ex justo) ex justo,V. ." 1. 20: Inascitur) loquuntur ex justo. VII,S,noscitur. V,S, I. 21: 1. 8: (aut) et. VII, 7, 1. 4: (fit) sit. V,S, I. 28: (et quoad id amat, non) (lnde etiam) lnde est. V, 6, quoad id etiam non. VII, 8,I. 13: (illis) illorum. V, 6, I. IS: (haec) hoc. VII, 9,I. 15: (illa) ilium. V, 6, I. 1. 13 : (ac post dicitur) ac ita20: (cogitatione) attentione; ducatur. VII, 10, 1. 7: (Illi the ~cogit" is deleted. V, coloni tales) Coloni tales.6, I. 20/21 : (ut vero primum Evidently "Illi" shouldperit haec communis) at vero have been deleted. VII, 10,ut primum perit communis. 1. 10: (agunt) MS. has V, 6, last but two: (ex alto) "agant," evidently a slip. raptu. V. 7, 1. I: (ex se VII, Il, I. 5 from end:oharitate) ex charitate. V, (super arida versantur) 7, I. 4: (et) at. VI, I, I. 5 : super arida. VII, 11, I. 3 (quae) quare. VI, I, I. 8: from end: (post hoc) post (usum) usus. VI, I, I. 16 hac. VIII, I. 3/4: (externa from end: (quales) qual is. corporis) externa, et suntVI, I, 1. 12 from end: externa corporis. VIII,1. 32 : (qualia) qualis. VI, I, 1. 7 (Externis) Externo. VIII, I, from end: (vitae, turn I. 17: (quia tunc malum) ope rum) vitae, operum. VI, quia malum. VIII, I, I. 7 2, I. 12: (etiam negotiatores) from end: (suo, indicio) suo negotiatores. VI, 3, I. 5: [et] ind.icio. VIII, I, last MS. reads "sint," not line but one: (Plures con­ "sit." VI, 3. I. IS: (in firmationes alibi) P l u res omni ordine) in caelorum conjlr11lotiones. IX, 4, 1. ordine. VI, 3, I. I9!20: 3/4: (extra hominem, at 90
    • REVISED READINGS OF THE LATIN TEXTcharitas est intra ilium) Quisque. Art. pr., 2, I. 37 :extra ilium. IX, 4, 1. 5 from (amet) amat. Art. pr., 2,end: (illis) illorum. XI, I. I. 9 from end; (ac) eL 5: (et sylvis) sylvis. XI, Art. pr., 3, I. 13: (seu)I. 9: (musices variae et) sed. Art. pr., 3, 1. 9:musices et. XI, 1. 36: (si (homo etiam vult) homo vere successi ve aut simul) si suc- vult. Art. pr., 3, 1. 3:cessive vel simul. The first (illi) annon. Also: won" simul" evidently should pates) potes. Art. pr., 4, be deleted. XI, I. 42/3: 1. 6: (convert it) invertit (?). (quae mens) mens. XI, Art. pr., 4, 1. 14: (sensualeI. 43/4: (in visceribus cor· illud hominis, quia) sen- paris) in corpore. XI, I. suale, quia. Art. pr., 4, I.48: (illis) illorum. XI, I. 25: (redit ad statum) redit 5: (omnia viscera in) in statum. Also: (est, et omnia in. XI,!. 52: (uni. qui) est, qui. Art. pr., 4, versaliter, sicut) univer- 1. 27: (reversionem) inver-,;aliter, fiunt sicut. XI, foot- sionem. Art. pr., 4, 1. 32: note, I. 2: (catenae cum) (fugit ilia) fugit etiam ilia.Gat e n a e. XI, 1. 63: Art. pr., 5, 1. 7: (sua pro- (recuperandae) recreandae. pria) suum proprium. Art. XI, I. 69: (aut si) more pr., 5, I. 34; (nee quod con- probably alia si. XI,!. 7 : temnere) quod contemnere. MS. read at first "Si Art. pr., 6, 1. 5 from end:in ilIis affectio"; then (operatur in [illum] per) " qui bus " (not " que ") operatur per. Art. pr.,was inserted above after 7, I. 9: (a) ex. Also: " ill is " ; evidently the" si " (quicquam) quamquam. Art.should have been cancelled, pr., 7, I. 21: (servire)and the "tunc" likewise. serviens. Art. pr., 7,and the clause should read 1. 6 from end: (illae) the same as at beginning of illorum. Art. pr., 8, 1. 22:subsequent paragraphs. XI I (facient) faciant. Art. plC., I. 88: (est mens spiritu1;llis) 8, 1. 27: (non amat) amat.est mens illorum spiritualis. Also: Delete "non in 3XI, I. 123: (sui bus, mures) lines following. Art. pr., 8,suibus, et mures. XI, I. 4 1. 27/8: (furatur et de-from end: (aliquid) aliquod. fraudat) defraudat. Art.Articulus primus, list of sec., 1. 3: MS. probablyheadings, 6: (paenitentiam has "a p par ent," notab illis agere) paenitentiam "appareat." Art. sec. I , age re. Art. pr., I, I. 9: I. 20 from end: (ac qui non)(Spiritus Sanctus idem) at non: possibly " ac non." Spiritus idem. Art. pr., I, Art. sec. I, last but 3/2: (et1. 62: (nee bonum) bonum sic caeteros: et tunc non) et nee. Art. pL, I,!. 63: (per. sic exterius et tamen non.foratum) conforatum. Art. Art. sec. I last I. : (ilium qui Ipr., 2, I. 34: (Unusquisque) idet in illo [bonum]) ilium 91
    • INDEXquia videt in illo. XII, I. charitatis.-The rest is can·14: (in ordine) in hoc celled. IX,!. 2 (neque) non.ordine. XII, 2nd heading: IX, I. 2: (sint) "faciunt"(credendum est et) creden­ and over it " sint " written.dum et. Ordo. et D., Ill, X, 1. 2 : (cognition is)I. 2/5: (charitatis, bonum cognitionum.civile proximus) INDEXof passages, quoted, cited, or referred to, from the Old andNew Testaments and the Vritings of Swedenborg. The numbers are paragraph numbers.Genesis i, 26 91 2 Corinthians, v. 17 210 " iii,6 2°4 Galatians v. 14 16Decaloguc (see General v. 16, 17, 24 Index) 25 210Isaiah i 12, 209 " vi, 15 210 .. i, 16, 17 26 Ephesians iv, 23, 24 210Matthew vi. 24 156 vii, 17, 18 1I8 xi, 27 . 170, 201 xxiii,26 . 21, 209 N.J.H.D. 9-17,18-31 . 9 xxviii, 18. 170, 201 Apoc. Exp. (work cited) 197 JP xxviii, 20 201 136 70Luke vi, 43 . 118 242 (2) 70 x,29-37 5° 478 (2) 70 xi, 39. 2°9 72 5 (4) 70 .. xvi, 13 15 6 Doct. of Lord (workJohn i, 1,2, 14 160 cited) 201 iii, 35 170, 201 Doct. of Faith (work v, 26 . 102 cited) 197 x, 1-9 160 Doct. of Life 9- 1 7 9 x, 30, 38 201 18-3 1 9,202 xiv, 6 102, 160 28-3 I, xiv,9- I I 201 50-52 . 12 xiv, 16-19 201 101-1°7· 203 xv, 5 201 .. .. 108-11 3. 2 xvii, 2 170, 201 D.L.W. (work cited) 92, 197 " xvii,lo 201 " Part III 101Romans xiii, 8-10 16 D.P. (work cited) . 197 xiii, 10 208, 210 159, 262, 263, 201 92
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE(Except when otherwise stated, all references are to paragraph numbers.) Aabed, those who lie - , 196.ABIDE, an interior affection -ing inwardly in doing goods of use continually, 158; how thought of the Lord continues to - with a soldier in battle, 166; affection of use - 5 inwardly in recreations, 193.abominable, - and irrational to think of man as God, 201.absence, servants behaviour in - of masters, 172.ABSTAIN, - from thinking and willing sins, 205; -ing from evils from obedience and fear of punishment, 210.academies, 78.ACKNOWLEDGE, - sins, 5; - that every good of love and truth of wisdom is from the Lord, 204.accept, how sailors are --ed by the Lord, 171.ACT (noun), unless the affection of truth from good is brought into - , it perishes; and an - there£rom is a use, 149; various -s of worship, 205.ACT (verb), 105; judges think, speak, and - from what is just, 163; -ing from evil and not from good, 185.ACTION, - from effort, 4; - itself in spirit = effort or Will, 4; thought, speech, and - , 114; no - possible from life other than a mans own, 119; external things of worship of body are done by -s and words, 173.activities, minds - and corresponding delights in body, 191.actor, worship not from charity cfd. to an - holding a firebrand, 177.ACTUAL, - evils and those hereditarily acquired, 2; man wanted to be - love and wisdom, not a recipient, 204.adjoin, the Divine can be -ed to a receptacle, 102.administering, the - of uses, 187. H !Jil
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEadministrant, an - judge over workhouses in hell, 196.AD~IIT,spirits from hell -ted to external man, 180; the sensual -----5 objects it desires from the world, 204.advancement, - of knowledge, 78.acjultery, 171.AFFECT, how men are ~d by a preacher, 122; how the priest who is in charity is -ed; 160; governors --ed by the good of subjects or citizens, 161 j an official -ed by use, not honour, 162; how music and singing - the mind, 189.AFFECTION, similar in regard to -s, 76 j form of the spiritual - of a kingdom, 84; after death a man becomes the ­ of his own love, 97; the - of truth from good is charity, 99; he who is not a form of the - of truth from good is a form of the - of falsity from evil, 100; there are genera of -s, 101; the life of a man who is to be regenerated is the - of truth from good, or charity, 102; the - of truth fr.om good, or of charity, 110-111;- of spiritual good, 110; - of rational or moral truth, and of ci viI or natural truth, 110; the - that is charity, 114; a mans ruling - , 118; how -s are imaged variously in the spiritual world, 120; a mari cannot become a charity unless he does the good of use to the neighbour from - and delight (chap. VI), 126-157, also. 154 and chap. VII; every society a series of - 5 in the order of the heavens, 137; how varieties of -s in heavenly order make the general good, 138; an ­ of charity, 14; charity=- of truth from good=- of use, 149; an - of use, 52; possible to do good of use from - of glory, honour, and gain, 157; good work in hell not done from - , 157; an interior - in doing goods of use continually, 158; - for doing goods of use is charity in its life. 162; what is just is of their (judges) - , 163; - , love, and thought of workmen about their work, 75.; everyones very - communicated and displayed in spiritual world, 185; such as -s are such are things pro­ ceeding, 185; music and singing affect the mind according to their correspondence with the -s, 189; -s in employ­ ments and their diversions, 190; the wills love with its -s in sensations of the body, 191 j diversions are various in accordance with the interior - in them, 192; diversions in those who have an - of charity, 193; only an - for position, 194; only an - for gain, 195; the - of use inwardly in recreations, 193; delight is said of love and the wills - therefrom, 193; closed minds of those not in - of charity, 193; how man turned away -----5 and thoughts from Lord to self, 204; not doing evil to neighbour from - of love towards neighbour, difference from doing it from obedience, 210; in the - is heat and light of love, 94
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE 2[0; those who do good from - not doing it from fear of punishment, are being regenerated, 2 [0; those who do good from obedience do not know that the - itself of good, with its delights, is the reward, 2[0; no one has any knowledge of this - , but he. who shuns evils as sins comes into.it, 2[0; the.- itself of love is like a flame, 211; flames descend109 from heaven =-s of good and truth so appearing, 211 ; the Lord flows into a mans - and gives light, 2[ I. .AFRAID, not - of the laws, [88; those not - of civil laws and public penalties or of losing renown, [95.Africa, those in - , 89.against (see contrary), evils shunned because they ·are ­ the Lord, 204; acting contrary to Divine laws=~­ God, 206.age, from earliest - to end of life, in good of use, [58.aggressor, army commander not an - but a defender, [64.alert, - farmers, [69.ALIVE, very many, after death, seeing they are - , [85; if man felt good not from himself but the Lord, he would believe himself not to be - , 20[; good after repentance is -,207.ALLOWABLE, belief that sins are - , 4, 5 footnote; sins - in thought but not in body,S.ambassador, 87.amend, a judge -ing the guilty evil, [63.ANGEL(S), before - a man appears in his own image, outside himself, 6; - are in a spiritual idea, 42; a man of heaven, or an - , 60; a society on earth appears as one man before - in the heavens, 84; the form of the charity of an - or spirit described, 97; - of the second heaven, 99; an - in charity as a part of the general heaven, [39; each indivi. dual .- is a man, [48; charities, that is - , [72; how worship in the external man appears before the - , 177; influx of good with - in heaven, 202.angel.man, 48.ANIMALS, men like - , 43, - in the spiritual world, [20.apes, men like - , 43.Apocalypse Explained, referred to, 70, [97.apostles, - taught repentance, 203.APPEAR, the external by which an evil man wants to - good, 202; good, before repentance, that -s outwardly good, 207; it -s as if love towards the neighbour fights against evils, 2[0; love, in spiritual world -s as a flame, 21 [ ; flames = affection of good and truth so -ing, 2[ I. 95
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEAPPEARAl"CE, charity in outward - , 40; good that has the - of being good, but inwardly is evil, 199; - of man doing good as from himself, 201.appetites, those who are lustings and - , 1<}6.APPOINT, governor -s officials under him, 161; officials -ed over groups of the people, 162; army commander -ed by either king or archduke, 164.approach, sailors exhorted to - the Lord, 171.APPROPRIATE, the Divine cannot be -d to man, 102; lest man should - evil to himself, 201.archduke, whether army commander is king or - , 164.ARMY, charity in the case of the commander of an - , 164; commander looks after his - , 164; charity in the case of officers under commander of an - , 165; betrayal of ­ to enemy, 195. •arrange, farmers who - their work, 169.arrogance, 4; love of self and -=heads of all sins, 205.AS FROM HIMSELF, man removing evils - , 2; man created so as to think and will - , 1°5; if man fights - , 18o; faculty of feeling good in himself, - , 201; unless a man felt good to be - , the good would not remain, 201; a man ought to shun evils as sins - , nevertheless from the Lord, 203·as of himself, a will and effort ,that he would like to give up doing sins and repent, given from the Lord, 206.as of yourself, what is - then? 203.asses, 195.ASSOCIAT(E), the -ing of men together effected through spiritual good, 60; all in the same heavenly society --d together, 76.atheist, 122.attempt, -ing to do good from the Lord before evil has been removed, impossible, 208.ATTEND, servants -ing on their masters, 172; -ing places of worship, 174.attention, paying - in a general way, 123.attribut(e), lest man should - to himself good or charity, -ing to himself what is the Lords, 201.AUTHORITY, a sin for a judge to have regard for - , 163; .someone doing homage to a person in - , 21 I.automaton, 201.avarice, 4; business man shuns - , which is an evil, and the root of more evils, 167. 96
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEavaricious, the, 95.averse, being - in mind from ungodly talk, 75.aware, a soldier not - of the thought of the Lord above his bravery in battle, 166. Bbackwards, man looking - away from the lord; turned him. self -=origin of evil, 204.bad, a - tree, and - fruit, 202.balls, games played with - , 189.banner, worship from charity dd. to a standard·bearer holding a -, 77.banquets, I~.barley, 95.battle, behaviour in - , of a commander, 164, of a soldier, 166.beast-men, 196.beauties, 189.beautiful things, 93.bed, in hell conditional on work, 196.bedroom, filled with excreta, 208.beggar, a - driven to work, if healthy, 128.BELIEF, - that there is a heaven and hell, 2; - that the Lord can remove evils, 2; - that one is not a sinner, 3; - in eternal life, 4; - that some sins are allowable, 4; - that man is entirely without sins, or that they have been re· mitted, 204; erroneous - , in Christendom, that he who has faith loves the neighbour, 210.llELlEV(E), faith at the present day is that the truth ought to be -d, although not seen, "3; he who does not - in God does reckon evil as a sin, 203; the Lord taught both to do and to - ; 2°3; everyones -ing according to his doing, 203; truths of faith from the Word teach what is to be -d and done that lot may be eternal life, 213.1l,::EFACTlONS, - of charity = goods done in freedom, outside a mans occupation, (chap. IX) 184-186; no one saved by - , but by means of charity in them, ,85.,86; - outside man, 18S; those who do good from obedience take the lead in - , 210.beseeching, - forgiveness, 203; - the Lord for help and power to resist evils, 204.birds, 189; - in the spiritual world. 120. 97
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE lllJl.TH (see BORN, innate), - does not· make anyone neigh­ bour more than another, 85; army commander brave in battle, unless by - he is of another nature, 164; the Churchs teaching that man is a sinner from his very origin and subsequent - , 205; people declaring they were in sins of every kind from conception and - , 205; every man by - is in evils of every kind, 210. black, 190. :blaspheming, 88. blasphemousness, 207. blessings, fields, vineyards, and crops as - , 169. BLOOD, how the heart gives - to each part of body, 146; a soldier in battle thinks of the enemy as desiring his - , 166. bloodshed, a soldier detests unjust - , 166. blossom, growth of good dd. to a tree -ing and bearing fruit, 167., boastful, army officer not ....,., 165. bodily, diversions of charity=enjoyments and pleasures of - senses, (chap. IX) 189-196. BODY, 43, 98; ones country called a - , 83; the people are in the - of the kings government, 83; the form of the - of a kingdom, 84; a spirit or angel in respect of his whole -=the form of his charity, 97; good works done, in the - , II5; relation of parts to general things in human - , 143-144, 146; the form of government in the living - , 146; form of a heav,enly society corresponds to that of the living - , 147; how the head directs all things of its - , 161; a soldiers mind brought down from its elevation into the - , 166; things of worship are external things of - or mind, 73; external things of - done by actions and words, 173; external things done in mind cohere with those of - , 173; external things of - that are of worship enumerated, 174; - exercised by manual work, 189; mind, when resting, descends into - , 91; mind and - , how related in delights and sensations, 191; - is a connected chain-like work, a single form, 19; the Lord and the Father one, like soul and - , 201; a man not a man by reason of face and - , 214. books, reading - of instruction and piety, 174; reading of - on history and philosophy, 189. BORN (see D1RTH, innate.), man is - into evils of every kind, 2; aU evils are - delightful, 2; man is - into the love of self, 2; the evil into which a man is - , 21 ; anyone ­ in ones country dd. with one - outside, 75; if I had been - in Venice or Rome; my country, or where I was - , 86; a man is - to the end that he may become a charity, 98
    • GENE~AL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE (chap. VI) 126-157, and 154; every man - to perform uses, 128; the origin of man being - into evil from his parents, 204; if man does not adopt the two meaQs of purification from evils, he remains such as he was - , 204; evils should be .shunned first, inasmuch as man is - into evil, 208. .bow, mind cid. to a bent - , I(!o.branch (of a tree), 116.brave, army commander - in battle, 164; how a soldier IS _. in battle, i66.bravery, a soldiers - , 166.breath, good after repentance puts away self and proprium with every - , 207.breathe, the Lord ----S something fragrant and sweet into di versions, 193.bribe, a sin for a judge to have regard to a - , 163­bring abollt (producere), Whatever the Internal man -s in the External, termed a si.gn, 181.DRING{S) FORTH (producere) (see produce), how charity is brought forth into lower things, 115; all things a man are images of him., 117; mans mind, when infernal, does not - any good that is in itself good, 202; the evil that an evil man - , 202.brother(s), 75, 76; sailors in heaven like - or companions, 17 I.burden, those "hose duties are a - , and are them~ehes a public - , 196.businesses, various, 134.b~s man (men), - responsible for all kinds of work,135; charity in the case of the - , 167. ccancel out, good does not - evil, 18.capillary vessels of body, 191.captain (see ship-captain).cards, games played with - , 189.carnal diversions, 195.carrion, 3.cats, 195­celebrated. employments performed solely for sake of reputa ­ tion, to become - , 96. 99
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEcelestial, spiritual love, but not - love, 95.centre, distance from - in heaven in accordance with use, 13i.CHAIN, body is a connected -like work, 191 i sensation as a force applied to the separate links of a - , and a form made up of continuous -s, 191.change, for mind kept in same ideas, 190.CHARITYdeflllitions 0/ -, the essence of - is good, Order and Arrangement, 3 i every good done to the neighbour is - , 7; - itself regards the good of a mans soul first, 60; - , or the good of interior love, 88 j the second heaven is from the lower love called - , 94 j when man has become external his love is called - , 94 j spiritual love is - , 95; the affection of truth from good is - , 99 j -=affection of truth from good = affectIOn of use, 149; genuine truth, the affection of which is - , 150 j affection for doing goods of use is - in its life, 162 j having love towards the neigh­ bour, or -,=a good of use, 171 j the internal man, which is - , 178; - , or love towards the neighbour, = doing good to others, 199; by - is meant every good a man does to others, 201 j fulfilling the law is what - is (Paul), 210.kinds 0/ -, genuine - , 52, 88, genuine - itself is prudent and wise, 54; spurious - , I, 6, 54, spurious - is of the will only, and not at the same time of the understanding, 54; external - without internal - is not - , 181.variol4s aspects and attributes 0/ -, the " first" of - , I, 40-41, 158, 199, 208; the" second" of - , 13, 40-41, 209­ 211; the "fiost" and the" second" of - , 40-41, 209; the quality of - , how recognized, 7, how discerned in heaven, 97; the quality of anyones - is such as the ­ he himself is, V, J? 66; the good of - itself is the good of the internal WIll, 64; the good of - , and the good of genuine - , 88; the object of - , (chap. IV) 72; man is the subject of - , (chap_ V) 90-125; hypocrites are able to put on the sincerity of - , 98 j the varieties of - are as many as the varieties of the affection of truth from good, 99; how every variety of - originates from truths, (09 j genera and species of -s: there are -s in the plural, 101 j degrees of - of a twofold kind, 101; various virtues of - enumerated, footnote p. 33 j the hidden things of - in a man, not known by him, but seen by the Lord, 167; signs of -=all things of worship, (chap_ VIII) 173­ 183; how external things of worship are signs of - , 177; when the external man is, and is not, a sign of - , 181; benefactions of -= goods done, in freedom, outside a man, occupation, 184; obligations of - dp.fined and enumerated, 100
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE 187; the honesty and willingness of - in obligations, 187; diversions of - enumerated and defined, (chap. XI) 18<;- 196; diversions in those who have an affection of - , 193; with those not in affection of - , the mind is closed; in so far as they recede from - their spiritual mind is as if stuffed up with glue, 193.- i" form, and form(s) of - , a man ought to be a - in form, 93-101; a - in form, defined, 96; the form of the - of an angel or spirit described, 97; he who is not a form of - is a form of hatred, 100; a man ought to be a - in form, not from himself but from the Lord, 102-106; 1I0w man is a form of -,107-113; the form of - dd. to the growth of a tree, 115-116; for a man to love the neigh- bour he must be a - in form, 125; "hen a man is a use, or good of use, he is a - , =a - in form, 151.152; how every man who looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins becomes a form of - , (chap. VII) 158-172; how judges become -s in form, 163; a business man loves his fe~low­ citizens from the - of which he is a form, 167; farmers become -s in spirit, and are then in a form of - , 169-man as a - , a man is not a - in respect of face, form, body, Or voice, 98; when man places merit in orks of - , his external is made a - , and not his internal, 104; a man is born to become a - , but he cannot, unless he constantly does goods of use, (chap. VI) 126-157, also 154; how an angel is gifted in the measure he is a - , 140; when a man is a use, or good of use, he is a -,=a - in form, 151-152; "hen man is not a - but a lusting, 157; a - , that is, an angel of heaven, 165; farmers become -s in spirit, and are then in a form of - , 169; -s, that is, angels, 172; benefactions= goods done by a man who is a - , 184.- witiz various officials and workers, 159; - in the case of the priest, 160; in the case of go"ernors, 161; officials under governors, 162; judges, 163; an army commander, 164; officers under an army commander, 165; the common soldier, 166; business man, 167; workmen, 168; farmers, 16g; ship-captains, 170; sailors, 171; servants, 72.- and faith, - and faith are one like essence and form, Ord. and Arr. 9; talking with other people about - and faith, 174; tne conjunction of - and faith, here dealt witll, 197; - is life, soul, and f.ssence of faith, and such as the - is, such is the faith, 19B; various acts of worship, both of failh and - , 205; truth and good make one like faith and - , 212; those who are in faith separate from -,213/-arious statements about - , - conjoins man to the Lord, Ord and Arr. 11; - before and after repentance, 10; 101
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE a wicked man has not - , [I; - in outward appearance, 40; - of him who does not make distinctions of neighbour becomes confused, 51; no - apart from spiritual good, 56; - regards spiritual goods in the first place, 77; man is a receptacle of - , 102-106; - is of the Lord with man, but it is given to him as if he himself were - , 106; they who are in - arc in light, 112; those who are not in ­ do not love truth in the light, but in the shade, I I ] ; the general inspires (heavenly qualities) into each angel as a part who is in - , 1]9; he who places - in good deeds alone, 155; how - perishes by reason of its opposites, 156; the judgments of a just judge are all of - , 16]; all things of - have reference to looking to the Lord, shunning evils, and doing the goods of use of ones office, 17]; - itself is in the Internal man, and its sign in the External, 178-[8]; when - is in the Internal man then all things of worship done in External are its signs, 177; worship proceeding from - , and worship not pro­ ceeeding from - , dd., 177; if - in internal does not fight with external, - perishes, 18]; no one saved by benefactions, but by means of - out of which they are done, and which is in them, [8.1; everyone saved according to quality of good or - in him, [85; those who place ­ only in good actions or deeds have not - in themselves, 186; with those not in - , obligations appear similar externally, but are not similar internally, 188; how one should do good so that - may be - , 199; no one can have - except from the Lord, 201 ; no one can have - from the Lord unless he shuns evils as sins, 202; good, before repentance, is not good, nor, before repentance, is - - , 207, in so far as a man does not wish to do evil to neighbour, he wishes to do him good from - , 209.chaste, 49; the - man, who loves his wife, loved by the unchaste, 122.cheerful, farmers - as a result of their work, 169; -ness attending banquets, feasts, meals, [89.childhood, a man learns civil goods in early - , 59; initiated from - into worship of God, 205.CHILDREN, infants and - not performing, but learning, goods of use, 129; a judge, like a father who corrects his - , 16]; army commander dd. to a father who looks after his ­ and servants, 164; instruction of - and servants, 174; expenses and outlays for ones - , 187.choice, mind makes its - of diversions in accordance with its interior state in the body, 19I.Christ, the Son of God, 20]. 102
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEChristendom, belief, in - , that he who has faith loves the neighbour, 210.CHRISTIAN, - good works, 18; - good(s), 20, 28; if I were a reformed - , 86; a Gentile loved in preference to a 89; the principle that it is - not to do evil to neighbour, 210.church (see places of worship), contributing to -es, 17.THE CHURCH (see ecclesiastical), the first of the doctrine of -,27; all initiated into - through knowing and not doing evil, 27; the state of - with man at this day. 94; the whole - and all religion founded on idea of God as one, 201; -s teaching that man is a sinner, 205; here there is no truth of faith - does not exist, and where there is no good of life religion does not exist, (chap. XII) 212­ 213; - and religion make one like truth and good, 212; - is a Church from its doctrine, and religion is religion from a life in accordance with doctrine, 212; all the truths of faith in - are from the Word, 213; it is said" - " on account of doctrine, and" religion" on account of life in accordance therewith, 21]; with those in faith separate from charity, there is neither - nor religion, 213; spiritual good is - with man, 214.city, cities, 87, 16i.CITIZEN, governors affected by the good of subjects or -s, 161; public good is also fellow -s good, 167; how a busi­ ness man loves his fellow -s, 167; taxes imposed on subjects and -s, 187; those who may betray army and -s to enemy, 195; neighbour in a natural sense = fellow - , 215.CIVIL, - moral, and spiritual good, 23. SS 83, 86, 214; - , moral, and spiritual laws, 59; - good is the good of a life in accordance with the civil laws, 58; - good, without spiritual and moral good in it, is animal good, 58; a man learns - goods from the Decalogue. 59; through his ­ good a man is a man of the world, 60; societies to administer various - affairs justly, 78; spiritual, - , and rational good of a kingdom, 84; moral good and - good, without religion, are merely external, 89; the affection of - or natural truth, I I I; various - positions, responsible for what is just, moral, etc., 134.135; governors who have jurisdiction in - affairs, 161; the - laws of justice, e.g. those of the Decalogue, 169; - obligations (enumerated and defined), 187; - laws, 195; - sins, footnote p. 66; neighbour to be loved in accordance with - good, derived from spiritual good and not separate from it, 214.cleans(e), how a man must be -d from evils before good can be done, illustrated by cup and dish, 208.209; if this -ing not done, they still appear good outwardly, 209. 103
    • GENERAL INDEX AND COKCORDANCEclemency, of charity, footnote p. 33.close, false things - rational sight or understanding, 202.cloth(e), -ing the naked, 17.clothing, 168; -in hell conditional on work, 196.cognitions, a faith of - , 198.cohere, external things of worship in mind - with those of body, 173, 176.COLOUR, sight goes if a single - is looked at continuously, 190; a garland of different ~d roses, 190; light turned into hideous -s, 202; a lovely and beautifully -ed flower, 207.comfort, 196.command, officers carrying out duties of - , 165.commander of an army, charity in case of -=highest officer, 164; officers under the - , 165.commend, a soldier -s his life to the Lord, 166.commerce, necessaries (in a kingdom) are there by means of all kinds of work and - , 131.common, the - good, 83; the - soldier, 166.CO:>l~IONWI;ALTH, 168 j in a well consti tuted - , no one is useless, 128; the - or society consists of ministries, func­ tions, offices, and various occupations, 134 j governors in -s, 161; various necessities and uses in the - , 187.communicate, everyones affection -d in the spiritual world, 185.communication, - of Whole globe and its parts by means of shipping, 170.C01>DlUNITY, 133; - or state, and sections thereof, 158; the ­ and indi viduals therein, 161, 163.companions, sailors in heaven like brothers or - , 71 j ­ with whom to gossip, eat and drink, 196.compassion, 40; - of charity, footnote p. 33.compel, everyone in hell -led to do good work, 157.complex, the Decalogue=- of all things of the Word, 206; Ten Words signify all truths in the - , 206.composite, a man in - form, 72, 79; a society having one function=one - man, 80.compound, a man in - form, 83.comprehend, forms of those in good cannot be -ed by natural man, 207.compulsion, how anyone serves freely, not under - , 172.conception, people declaring they were sinners from - and birth, 205. 104
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEconcupiscences (see lust, lusting).CONFESS, a man ought to - to being a sinner, 25; -ing evils, 79; man -ing that he is a sinner without being aware of what sin is, 205; in so far as a man recognizes and knows what sins are, he can see them in himself, ­ them before the Lord, and repent of them, 206; those -ing they are sinners without having examined themselves, 210.confession, - of sins, I, 4, 7; the - of ones sins before the Lord brings about conjunction with Him, 206.confirmation, - of falsity, "3; --5, 4, 183.conflict (n.), - between internal and external man in regeneration, 180.conflict (v.), abstaining from thinking and willing sins would - with delight of a mans life, 205.confuse, charity becomes -d, 5 I.CONJOIN, a man is a form of charity of such quality as, with him, good of the will IS -ed to truths of the understand­ ing, 107-113; --ing themselves interiorly with infernals and externally with hea"enly, 186.CONJUNCTION, - of man with the Lord by charity, Ord. and Arr. II; - of minds by love, 14; - of each one in heavens effected in accordance with spiritual good, 56; - effected by the good of a mans soul, 60; reciprocal - , 106; ­ with the neighbours good and not with his person, 124; - of whole globe and its parts by means of shipping, 70; - of charity and faith, where dealt with, 97; the con­ fession of sins brings about - with the Lord, 206.connected, body a - chain-like work, 191.conquer (see overcome), the Lord -s the devil if man fights as from himself, 180.conscious, sins of which a man is not - to be enumerated, footnote p. 66.consider, when a man -s repenting, 179.consideration, give - to evils, 185.consistories, 78.constant, why - uses are to be done, 156.CONSTANTLY (see continuously), a man cannot become a charity unless he - does the good of use, (chap. VI) 126-157, also 54; how a man is to do the good of use - , 54 and chap. VII; he who places charity in good deeds alone cannot do uses - , 55; army commander ­ meditating on goods of use, 164; army officers - doing goods of use that are of charity, 165. 105
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEcontempt for others, 4.content, a workman - with his lot, 168; ship-captains ­ with their pay, 170.contented, army officer - in SpirIt, 165.continual, the Lords endeavour to reform and regenerate, 203.CONTINUALLY, how a man is - in the good of use, 158; governors - doing a good of use, 161; officials doing goods of use - , 162; judges doing goods of use - , 163; farmers - looking to the Lord, 169; sailors doing goods - in no other work than seamanship, 171; sins done ­ to be enumerated, footnote p. 66.continuity, a break in the - if constant uses are not done, 156.continuous, a form made up of - chains, 19Lcontinuously, when a single object or colour is looked at - , examples, 190; when the mind is - intent on work, it longs for rest, 19Lcontrary (see against), evils - to Divine laws 204; anyone acting - to Divine laws is acting against God, 206.contribution, an officials - to the general good, 162; -s to pious uses, 185.corporeal and sensual men, 196. corpse, idea of man as God stinks like a - , 201; influx of suns heat into -s, 202.corrections, 79. CORRESPOND, how offices and employments make a form -ing to the heavenly form, 137-142; everyone in heaven allotted a house -ing to his "ork, 137; how an earthly society -s to a hea venl y society, 139; the form of a heavenly society -s to that of the living body, in respect of its uses, 147; -ence of music and singing with affections, 189; mind resting seeks delights -ing to its activities, 191. couch, idleness, the devils - , 168. counsel, seafarers -led to pray to the Lord, 170. counterfeit, infernal delight may - heavenly, 194. COUNTRY (see CO}DIONWEALTH, native land.), ones - is the neighbour, 72; ones - is neighbour according to its spiritual, moral, and civil good, 83-86; ones - as one thing, a man in compound form, 83; - does not make the neighbour, 8S; ones - should be loved according to the quality of its good, 85; a duty to do good to ones - , 85; ones - should be loved in a higher degree than others, 106
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE 85; my - , or where I was born, 86; I must not hate an unfriendly or hostile - , 86; good performed by empire, kingdom or republic to ones - , 87; love of ones - , 122; army commander goes to war for protection of his - , 164; to an army officer, his - is the neighbour, 165; those in love of gain may sell their - , 195; ones neighbour tp be loved, in a natural sense, 215.coveting, 15, 208.covetous, 205.craftsmen, the several kinds of - , 134.CREATE, man was -d to be a form of love and wisdom, 91 ; man is finite and -d, 102, 201; man -d into a form recepti ve of life, 104; man so -d that he may think and will as from himself, 105; the Lord cannot - and finite Himself in another, 201; man -d into image and likeness of God, a recipient of love and wisdom, 204; how man returns to state into hich he was -d, 204.creation, since the first - , man has become external, 93.creature, how man becomes spiritual, and a new - , 210.crops, 132, 169.crucify, -ing the flesh, 37, 210.cunning, with an army commander not but prUdence, 164.cup, the - and dish that are to be cleansed in~ide first, 208, 209.cure, palliative -ing, 25.Customs, payment of duties to the 18 7. odamnation, eternal - , 2.dancing, - at weddings and festive gatherings, 189.dangers, of ship-captains, 170.dangerous, influx of good before evil is removed is - , 208;DAY, at this - man has become external, 93; the state of the Church with men at this - , 94; what the truth of faith is at the present - , I I 3; heat and light by - from thc sun, 210. .dead, those who work only for the sake of divcrsions, said to be - , 196.deadly evils, 2. 107
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEDEATH (see DIE), spurious good taken away at - , 6; after - every man comes among his own, 76; natural relation. ships perish after - , 76;, after - , a man becomes the affection of his own love, 97; state of farmers after - , 169; sailors who shun evils not afraid of - , 171; state after - of those who make a great parade of having done good works, 185; state after - of corporefll and sensual, 196; after - everyone to render an account of his works, 203; evils like a disease that eats away and brings - , 204; quality of good before repentance recognized manifestly after - , 207.the DECALOGI1E, 59. footnote p. 66, 205; - was the " first" of the "Vord, 27; - =" first" of the > ord = complex of all things of the Word, 206; precepts of - , 206, 208, 210; laws of - , 59; civil laws of justice, e.g. those of - , regarded as Divine by farmers, 169; sailors who do not commit evils listed in - , 171.deceitfulness, 207.deceiving anyone in word or deed, 205.DEED, internal and external eect or - , 4; -s, speech, and thoughts of a man who is a charity, "7; deceiving anyone in word or - , 205,DEEDS (see GOOD DEEDS).defence, so long as aggression is - , 164.defender, army commander not an aggressor, but a - , 164deflower virgins, [5.defraud, -ing in payments, [88; -ing the neighbour, 208.DEGREE, the - of neighbour in accordance with - of good and truth, 55; one lIlan is not the neighbour in same ­ as another, 55; good is distinguished in accordance with its - 5 , 55; -s of charity, spiritual, moral and civil. 59; -s of good, civil, moral and spiritual, 60; ones country should be loved in a higher -, 85; -s of charity of a two­ fold kind, !O[; a workman loves himself and neighbour in equal - , 168.OEI.IGHT, -s of e"ils dd. to poisonous flowers, etc., 2; -s of evils remain till death if not removed, 2; heavenly - the reward of good done from spiritual affection, 8; lusting and its - , 24; a man cannot become charity unless he does the goods of use to the neighbour from affection and - , (chap. VI) 126-[57; everyone in heaven -ed with his own pursuit=the source of his - , 138; on earth every· one places - and good fortune in honours and wealth. [41; -s of glory, honour, and gain, [57; - given by books, 189; every form gives - an account of diverse things in it, 190; -s in body corresponding to minds 108
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE activities, 191; -s felt as a whole and not individually, 191; how -s qualified in body by mind, 19; "seet" said of spiritual - , 193; - said of love, and wills affection therefrom, [93; - felt by those who have only an affection for position = infernal - , counterfeiting heavenly, their - full of undelightful things, 194; - of being "ealthy, 195; an infernal - in diversions of those in affection for gain, 195; sins done on account of -s from what is hereditary, to be enumerated, footnote, p. 66; abstaining from thinking and willing sins would conflict with the - of a mans life, 205; an affection of good itself, with its -= reward, 210.m:LlGHTFUL, all evils are born - , 2; - views, ,89; every- thing loved is also - ; that which is said to be good is all that which is - , 205.deliverance of country from invasion, 164-demigod, hatred and revenge because one is not honoured and worshipped as a - , 205_demons, those who only love position become - , 194.den(y), power to resist evils, when besought, never -ied, 204.depict, forms of good that cannot be -ed, 207.depress, business man not -ed by misfortunes, 167.DISCEND, mind when at rest -s into body, 191; flames that - from heaven, 211.described, forms of good that cannot be - , 207.DEStRE, how - of the mind loses keenness, 190; a - for ones function breaks off recreations, 193; when man -s reformation and regeneration, 203; the sensual and objects it -s, 204; - for reward, 207.desisting from evils, 33.despising another in comparison with oneself, 205.destruction, ruin and - in warfare, 164; security of a country from invasion and - , 165.DEVIL, the - , that is, evil, cast out by repentance, la; possi ble for -s to love each other, 88; idleness, the -s couch, 168; sailors shunning the -=evil itself, 17; spirits from hell, called the -, with whom the Lord fights, 180; so long as a man is in eil, and through that in company with the - , 199; influx of good with -s not received, why, 202_devil-man, 48; if you do good to a - he may kill you or others 5"devour, 195.devout, seafaring men more - than others, 170.devoutly, singing - , 174- 109
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEdiabolical, - good, 6; - spirits acquire strength from the simple, 53.DIE (see Df.ATH), if a soldier -s, he -s in the Lord, 166; if sailors shun evil, then if they - , they - in the Lord, 171; a man would rather - than live perceptibly from another, 201.DIFFERENCE, -s of the neighbour and of good, 74; -s of good are infinite, 74; - between governors and officials under them, 162; - between loving neighbour from obedience and from affection, 210.DIFFE,RENT, palaces in heaven - , 137; parts of human body - , yet felt as one, 143; a garland of - coloured roses, 190; after repentance good is quite a - thing (from before), 207.diligence, 130, J35, 139·diligent, 195.dinners, saying prayers at - and suppers, 174.direct, head -s all things of its body, 161; a governor is a servant -ed by the Lord, 16 ..discerned, how the form and quality of charity with angels and spirits is - , 97.disciples preached repentance, 26.discrimination, genuine charity does good with - , .)2.discussions, pUblic, private and domestic, 189.disease, evils like a - that eats away and brings death, 204.diseased, 3.disguises, must remove any - , 4.dish, the cup and - that are to be cleansed inside first, 208, 209.dishonest, those externally honest but internally - , 195dishonesty, a workman shuns - and fraud, 168.disordered, light flowing into objects in which all things are -J 202.display, affections communicated and -ed in the spiritual world, 185.DISTINCTION(S), - of neighbour in accordance with good and truth, 51; no - of persons in respect of charity, 166; between means and work of a business man, 167; ­ beteen u,es done for ~elf and for neighbour, 185; _ ... between doing good from obedience and fear of punish­ ment, and from affection of love, 210.distinguish, good is -ed in accordance with its degree, 55; the Lord -es between uses done for self and for the neighbour, 185. } 1(1
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEdiverse, every form gives delight on account of - things in it, 90.DIVERSIONS, - of charity =enjoyments and pleasures of senses for recreating mind, (chap. XI) 189-196; - for sense of sight, 189; - for sense of hearing, 189; various other - enumerated, 189; - of positions or employments =- of affections, 90; - in those who have an affection of charity, 93; - in those who only have an affection for position, 94; - in those who only have an affection for gain, 95; - in those who perform their employments solely for the sake of sustenance, reputation, comfort, etc., 196.diverted, the mind - by manual work, 189.DIVINE, the - cannot be appropriated to man, 102; man mistakenly believes that the - is transfused into him, 104; the Lord must dwell in what is - , and so he makes man receptive of the - proceeding, 104; what is - (in a king. dam), 30, is there by means of ministers, 3, 35; what is - in an earthly society, 39; farmers regard laws of Decalogue as - , 16<); the - in the Lord, and the - from Him, 201; the - Trinity, 201; - Good=heavenly heat; - Truth = heavenly light, 202; the Lord from His - Love, in continual endeavour to reform and regenerate man, 203; goods of love and truths of wisdom, in themselves --, 204; evils contrary to - laws, 204; man who knows that pre­ cepts of Decalogue are - laws can receive - influx, 206; not doing evil to neighbour out of obedience to - law, 210.Divine Love and Wisdom, Angelic Wisdom concerning (see Love).Divine Providence, Angelic Wisdom concerning (see Providence).DO, nONE, good=a desiring to - , and to know for the sake of -ing, So; how a man in charity -es the goods of use continually, and" hen not -ing them, has it in mind to - them, 158; affection for -ing the goods of use, 162; the charity out of which benefactions are - , 185; if those in hells workhouses do not - tasks appointed, 196; how one should - good, 99; faculty of feeling good in himself, as from himself, to the end that he may - it, 201; the Lord can rouse an evil man to - good from selfish and worldly considerations, 202; in repenting a man says, " I wont - this, etc.," 2°3; -ing and believing, 2°3; what one wills and does not - , believed to be not a sin, 2°5; a will and effort as of himself to give up -ing sins and repent, 206; he who loves the neighbour does not - evils, 210; possible actually not to - evil, and still not love the neighbour, 210; truths of faith from Word teach what is to be believed and - , so that lot may be eternal life, 213. III
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEDOCTRINE (see teaching), - and life, 8<), 212-213; the Church is a Church from its - , and religion is religion from a life in accordance with - ; the - ought to be composed of truths, 212; it is said "the Church" on account of - , and "religion" on account of life in accordance therewith, 213.Doctrine of New Jerusalem concerning Lord, Life, Faith (see under those words).domestic discussions, 189.door, the Lord as the - of the sheepfold, 160.drink, companions to gossip, eat and - with, 196.driven, a useless person - to work, 128; those in hells workhouses - to do something useful, 196.drum, 166.drunken bouts, 194.dung, 195; influx of suns heat into - , 202; good with hypocrites like gilded - , 202.DUTY, DUTIES, a - to do good to oncs country, 8S; how officers carry out the - of their command, 165; how ship. captains are to carry out their - , 170; payment of - to the Customs, 187; - done for the sake of diversions, a burden to them, 196.dwell, how the Lord -s with a man, 104; the good of a house is the -irig in it, 129. Eear(s), 102, 103, (of corn) 195.early, farmers who rise - in the morning, 169.earn, employments performed solely for sake of what men -,Ig6.earnings, those who let others work, and keep the - , 196.EARTH, ignorance of people on - who place delight in honours and wealth, 141; the Lord = God of heaven and - and sea, 170-171; the Lord=God of heaven and -,201.earthly, how an - society corresponds to a heavenly, 139.eat, companions to gossip, - and drink with, 196.eats away, evils like a disease that - and brings death, 204.ecclesiastical, various - affairs (in a kingdom), 78.education, 85.EFFECT, internal and external - or deed, 4; -s of a mans life, 119; when the Lords endeavour to reform and regenerate comes into - 203. 112
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE~;FlORT, action from - , 4; - in a man=will, 4; -=action itself in spirit, 4; movement and - , 114; when man makes an - for reformation and regeneration, 203; a will ·or as of himself, ·to give up doing sins and repent, 206.elasticity (of a bow), 190.elevation, how a soldiers mind is brought down from its into the body, 166.empires, kingdoms and republics, 87.t;MPLOYMENT, by -s are meant occupations like those of craftsmen, 134; offices and -s, their form corresponding to the heavenly form, 137-142; how each one is a good of use in accordance with the scope of his office or - , 149­ 153; the work of ones office or - , how done in order to become a form of charity, (chap. VII) 158-172; diversions of positlpns and -s, 190; uses in -s of those in affection for gain, 195 -s performed solely for sake of sustenance, reputation, earnings and comfort, 196; duties of - done for sake of diversions, 196.enact, governors who - laws of use, 16I.end (see purpose), a man born to the- that he may become a charity, (chap. VI) 126-157; the good of use as an ­ with children, 129.endeavour, the Lords continual - to reform and regenerate man, 203.endowing places of worship and hospitals, 210.ENE~I(Y), army commander does not exult in slaughter of - , 164; attitude of a soldier to .the - , 166; betrayal of army and citizens of country to -ies, 1<)5.engagements entered into which thereby become obligations, 18 7.enjoyable, uses as - as dung to swine or mice to cats, 195.~:NJonIENT, 168; how given to an angel, 140; diversions of charity =various -s and pleasures, (chap. XI) 1S9-I~; sources of -s and pleasures, 19I.enlighten, 105.enliven, sight -ed by several colours, 190.enmity, enmities, 194; slandering the neighbour out of - , 20 5.enviousness, 207.envy, -ing anyone his goods, 205.equal, . a workman loves himself and neighbour in degree, 168.equally, the simple say, "Every man IS - my neighbour ," 52. 113
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEerroneous belief that he who has faith loves the neigh­ bour, 210.ESSENCE, - of charity, Ord. and Arr. I, 3; - and form dd. to charity and faith, Ord. and Arr. I, 9; truth makes one with good, as a form with its - , 67; such as the - is, SllCh is the form, 67; love is the - , and wisdom is the (arm of love, 92; faith in its - , 105; a truth in its ­ is a good, 109; charity=the life, soul, and - of faith, 98; God is one in - and Person, 201; good that in its - is a spiritual good, 201; whatever proceeds from anyone derives its - from him, 201; if the Lord were not the Good a man does, it would not have an - of good, but an - of evil, 201; good, before repentance, has not an - of good, but an - of evil, 207.estranging, man - himself from the Lord, 204.ETERNAL LIFE, talking with other people about ,174; thinking and meditating about - , 75; what is to be believed and done that a mans lot may be - , 213.eternity, being sa"ed, live to - , 201.Europe, those in - , 89.evading laws, 188.evening, in the good of use from morning to - , 58; morning and - prayers and hymns of seafaring man, 70; saying prayers morning and - , 74.EVIL,-s in man by birth, man born into - of every kind, 2; mans will=his proprium=nothing but - , 2; all -s are born delightful, 2; man in - from head to foot, 3; the - into which a man is born, 21 ; the origin of man being born into - from parents, and his proprium nothing but - , 204; every man by birth in -s of every kind, lusts only after what is - , 210.various kinds 01 -, -s actual and hereditarily acquired, 2; inward and outward - , 6; the - of lusting, or -s root, 22; avarice=an - , and the root of more -s, 167; -s residing in the external man, 180; the voluntary proprium =-; the intellectual proprium=falsity from that - , = falsity of -, 205; concupiscences that are the roots of -,206.r~moval 01 -s, shunning -s because they are sins, I, 2, 7, 8, (chap. VII) 58-172, 173, 185, 99, 202, 203, 204; the devil, that is - , cast out by repentance, 10; -s listed in Decalogue, especially shunned by sailors who look to the Lord, 71; when a man sees and resist his -s, 179; -s must first be removed in order that good may be from the Lord, 201; -s shunned because they are sins=against the Lord and contrary to His Divine laws, 204; two means by which a man is purified from -s, 204; -s not removed 114.
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE by only looking to the Lord and praying, nor by only shunning them, 204; -s removed by repentance. 207; how a man must be cleansed from his -s, before good can be done; - must be removed first, by repentance, inasmuch as man is born into - , 208; whether removing -s or loving neighbour is first, 210.- and good, doing - is contrary to the good of love, 14; no one is able to do good and at the same time to do - , 20; - does not know what is good, 26; an - man can do good but not the good of charity, 40; moral good without spiritual good may be - , 57; an - man can love a good man. 122; acting from and not from good, 185; so long as a man is in - , he can do no other than impure good; this is inwardly - , 199; unless the good a man does to the neighbour were from the Lord, it would have an essence of - in it, for the man would be in it, and a man in himself and in proprium is nothing but - , 201; everyone able to do good, even an - man, 202; -s do not receive good, they reject it, 202; the Lord can turn the - that an - man brings forth into good, 202; He can rouse an - man to do good, 202; good that is intrinsically - , 202; so far as a man hates ­ because it is against God, he does good from God, 202; man not able to know which thing is - , knows no other. wise than that - is good, 205; good before repentance has an essence of - withll1, 207; influx from the Lord before - removed is dangerous, as good is turned into - , 208.various statements about - , - to be regarded as fatal, 2; not wishing to do - to the neighbour is of charity, 14; not wishing to do - to the neighbour, is loving him. 210; in SO far as a man does not wish to do - to the neighbour, he wishes to do him good from charity, 209; things issuing from an impure fountain are inwardly - , 17; many have supposed there was no - with them, 19; every - is con· trary to charity, 20; the recognition of - , 33; if a Gentile says, " I will not do this - because it is against God," 89; the guilty - amended by a judge, 163; - thoughts and intentions from the devil, 175; when the internal man is - , 180; what brings about a mans reflecting on the -s in himself. 18l; giving consideration to -s as sins, 185; faith and - do not go together, 185; -s like a disease that eats away and brings death, 204; the origin of ­ strengthened by man looking to himself, 204; which - is in good before repentance recognized from tone of speech after death; various such -s enumerated, 207; no one who loves another does - to him, 210; difference between not doing - from obedience, amI from affection, 210; abstaining from - from fear of punishment, 210. 115
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEevil-doing, 88.evil uses, 79.!i:XA)IlNE, 19; when a man -s himself, 179; when a certain person -d himself, in the world of spirits, 205; those confessing they are sinners without having -d them· selves, 210.excreta, 208.cxercis(e), manual work -ing the body, 189.exhort, sailors -ed to approach and pray to the Lord, 171­~:XIST,. the general good -s from goods of use; 127; a sign= an indication and testification that a thing -s, 182; hear. ing, after death, that heaven and hell do - , 185; spiritual faith cannot - apart from charity, 198; how a good of charity, or spiritual good, may - , 201 ; if the Lord created and finited Himself, He would no longer - , 201; where there is no truth of faith, the Church does not - , and where there is no good of life, religion does not - , (chap. XII) 212-213.expand, jests that - the mind, 189.expenses and outlays for household, 187.experience, from - I know that a man would rather die, than live perceptibly from another in himself, 201.extension, general and particular - to uses, how one is dependent on the other, 162.EXTERIOR, the interior qualifies the -, 21; internal love IS turned into - love, 93; conjoining themselves interiorly with infernals, and -Iy with heavenly, but everyone deprived of - and left to interior, 186.EXTERNAL (noun), how mans - is made a charity, and not his internal, 104; the Lord flows into an evil mans - , by which he wants to appear like a good man, 202.EXTERNAl. (adjective), good works done before shunning evils as sins are - , 17; unless they were kept in .- things they could not be saved, 19; moral good, without spiritual good, is - good, of the - will, 57; the - will and under­ standing, 62; since creation, man has become - , 93; when man has become altogether - , 94; all things of worship = -things of body or mind, 173; - things of body done by actions and words, 173; - things of mind=those done in will and thought, 173; - things of body that are of worship enumerated, 174; - things of mind that are of worship enumerated, 175; why things of mind are termed -, 176; how - things of worship are signs of charity, 177; - charity without internal, is not charity, 180. 116
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEEXTERNAL MAN, if I love him on account of his doctrine only, I love him as an - , 89; charity in the Internal man, and its sign in the - , 177183; worship in - proceeding from charity, and in - not from charity, 177; - said to be the flesh, 178; internal man manifests itself by - , and at war with it, 179; how the Lord operates by means of Internal man on - in regeneration, 180; e:vil residing in - , 180; spirits from hell admitted to - , 180; when, and when not, - is a sign of charity, 181; if Internal man does not fight with - and its flesh, charity perishes, 183.EXTERNALLY, how obligations appear - and internally, 188; infernal and heavenly delights alike - , 194; - honest but internally dishonest, 195.eye, 102, 103, 123. FFACE,S, 43; the form of the - of a kingdom, 84; charity discerned from the - and voice of an angel, 97; - and voice, how far charity can be discerned from them, gS; a man not a man by reason of - and body, but by reason of good of his will, 214.faculty of feeling good in himself, as his own, 201.tAITH,-and charity, charity and - , like essence and form, Qrd. and Arr. 9; - qualified by charity, Qrd. and Arr. 10; talking with other people about charity and - , [74; the conjunction of charity and - , where dealt with, [97; not a grain of spiritual - apart from charity, charity= life, soul, and essence of - ; - is such as charity is; - preceding charity= - of cognitions=a historical - , [gS; various acts of "·orship, both of - and charity, 205; because truth is of - and good is of charity, they make one as - and charity, and understanding and will, 212.- alone, and - separate from charity, - alone, 202; I repent through - , and - saves without works, 203; for you, let it be - ; for me - and works together, 203; erroneous belief that he "ha has - loves the neighbour, 2[0; no one can have a - that has anything living in it unless he shuns evil as sins, 2[0; they who are in - alone do good from obedience, not from af:fection; they have no knowledge of -, 210; with those who by doctrine and life aJe in - separate from charity, there is neither the Church nor religion, 213.various statements about - , - of cognitions=historical - , Qrd. and Arr. 10; the evils of - , 33; when man has 117
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE become external his wisdom is called - , 94; - is the truth, 95; perception, which is - in its essence, 1°5; what the truth of - is at the present day, 113; - and evil do not go together, 185; where there is no truth of - , the Church does not exist, (chap. XII) 212.213; all truths of - in the Church horn the Word, what they teach, 213.Faith, Doctrine 0/ New 1erusalem concerning (referred to), 197.faithful, every - man loved by the unfaithful, 122; ship. captains - towards owners of ship, 170.FAITHFULLY, a Gentile who says he will do his work - , 122; honestly, justly, and - carrying out ones work, a condi· tion for becoming a form of charity, (chap. VII) 158.172; when a man honestly, justly, and - carries out his work, he is continually in the good of use, 158; so far as anyone serves - , he is loved and led by the Lord, 172.false things have closed rational sight, 202.false witness, 15, 20, 171, 205, 210.FALSITY, - and evil, 86; the affection of - from evil, 100; how - may be called truth, 113; when man knows no otherwise than that - is the truth, 205; devils turn truth into - , 202; intellectual proprium = - from evil =-of evil; man from proprium not abte from himself to know what is - from evil, 205.families, farmers at home with their - , 169.farmers, 30, 135, 202; charity in the case of - , 169.fatal, evils regarded as - , 2.father, 85; a judge like a - who corrects his children, 163; army commander dd. to a - who looks after his children, 164.the Father, "As - hath Life in Himself," 102; the Lord and - are one, like soul and body, 201; Trinity in His Person, named - , Son, and Holy Spirit, 201; for. giveness sought from God - , 203.fear, laS kept from - of punishment, 188; those doing good and abstaining from evi,1 from obedience, are doing it from - of punishment, 210.feasts, 189.feed, something to - upon, in meadows, 195.feel, man -s delights not individually, but as a whole, 191; faculty of -ing good in himself, as his own, 201.feeling, affections (in external worship) that rea.ch sight and - , 175; sight and - , 201.festi ve gatherings, 189. 118
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEfibres of body, and delights, 19I.field(s), 132, 169, 189, 193, 195·fifty, up to - or a hundred sins, footnote, p. 66.tIGHT, how the Lord in and with man -s against the devil, 180; how man -s against evils in repenting, 203; man not able to love neighbour before he shuns evils and -s against them. It appears as if this love itself -s, but not before the man is in it, 210; not doing evil to neighbour is -ing evils in oneself, 210.filthy talk, 175.finds out, genuine charity - what sort of man a neighbour is, 52.fine, when a judge inflicts a - or a penalty, 163.finite, man is - and created, 102, 201; the Lord cannot create and - Himself in another, 20I.firebrand, worship not from charity dd. to an <ictor holding a - , 177.FIRST, the " - " of charity, 1,8,40-41,158,199,208,210; evil must - be put away, 27; the Decalogue=the - of the Viiord, 27, 28, 206; the D.ecalogue=the - of the doc­ trine of the Church, 27; charity regards spiritual goods in the - place, 77; the third heaven, which is from the - men, 94; governors - in living subject to laws of use, 161 ; a sin for a judge not to put justice in the - place, 163; which is - , to shun evils or love neighbour, 199 footnote; evils must - be removed; and shunning evils should be - , 208; whether loving the neighbour or removing evils comes - , 210; being reformed comes - before regenera­ tion, 210, five, - harlots and - chaste maidens, 49; - brothers in heaven, and - in hell, 76; - organs of sense, 143. flame, the affection of love itself is like a - , 211; love, in the spiritual world, appears from afar as a - , 211; -s that descend from heaven = affections of good and truth so appearing, 21[. flatterers, 65, FLESH, crucifying the - , 37, 210; External man said to be the - , at war with spirit, 178; to External man, called the - , spirits from hell admitted, 180; if spirit does not fight with - , charity perishes, 183; Paul says - is against spirit, and - with its lust must be crucified, 210. flocks, 189. flow through, good, if not felt as from himself, would - , 210. flower(s), 132, 189; good after repentance like a lmely and beautifully coloured , 207. 119
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEfood, 168, 208; - in hell conditional on work, 196.foolish, 43.foot, from head to sole of - no soundness, 205.force, - of a bow derived from its elasticity, 90; sensation like a - applied to the separate links of a chain, 9I.foreigners, 70.forgive, beseech God the Father to - you, 203.FORM)- oj charity, charity in - , a man ought to be a charity in - , 93; a charity in - defined, 96; the - of the charity of an angel described, 97; the -s of charity are innumer­ able, 99; a - of charity, of hatred, of affection of truth from good, of the affection of falsity from evil, 100; man is not a - of charity from himself, 104; how man is a ­ of charity, 107; what proceeds from a man who is a - of charity, "4-121; the - of charity, dd. to the growth of a tree, 115-116; differing -s, and the common - , of charity, 117; for a man to love the neighbour he must be a charity in - , 125; ,,-hen a man is a use, he is a charity in - , 52; how every man who looks to the Lord and shuns evils as sins becomes a - of charity, (chap. VII) 58"72; a - of charity, that is, a receptacle of it, 158; charities in - , 163; how the mind becomes a - of charity, 165; the business man as a ­ of charity, 167; farmers, who become spirits in a - of charity, which is a human - , 169.- oj heaven, heavenly - , the - of heaven is the human - , 81; offices and employments regarded as to goods of use, make a - corresponding to the heavenly - , 37-142; the heavenly - of use in the living body, 147; the heavenly ­ jis a man, 148; how each one is a good of use in the heavenly - , 149-153; when a man is not a - of heaven, but a - of hell, 57; a man whose lifes - is inverted, opposed to heavenly - , 202.essence and - , essence and - dd. to charity and faith, Ord. and Arr., 9; truth makes one with good as a - with its essence, 67; such as the essence is, such is the --, 67.man as a - , a man is not a man from the - , 43 a man in composite - , 72, 79; a country as a man in compound - , 83; man created to be a - of love arid wisdom, 9; man is created into a - receptive of life, 103; offices and employments also make a - , corresponding to the human - , 143-148; all parts of human body = goods of use in a most perfect - , 143; every man a - of his own love, evil, infernal, or good, heavenly, 202; - of a mans mind, when 120
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE infernal, 202; how man inverted his ~, turning away from the Lord, 204; man is a - of evil before repentance, 207; -s of those who are in good can never be comprehended by natural man, cannot be depicted or described, -s of good, yet the - itself co.nsists of truths, 207.various -s, ·truth is good in - , 70; the - of a kingdom described as to face, body, manners, speech and the like, 84; wisdom is the - of love, 92; a mans mind is a spirit in human - , 98; truth is the - of good, as speech is the voices - , 109; two -s of the voice, singing and speech, 110; the - of government in the living body, 146; every - gives delight on account of diverse things in it, 1<)0; body=a connected chain-like work, a single - , 191; a - made up of continuous chains, 191; the lifes - of devils, 202; love with everyone makes - of his life, 202; good, before repentance, not good, however much in its - it appears outwardly good, 2°7; - of good after repen­ tance like - of a lovely and beautifully-coloured flower, 2°7·form (verb), unless man believes good to be as from himself, he could not be -ed for heaven, 201; nothing else -s spiritual part of man but his love, 202.fortune, everyone on earth places delight and good - in honours and wealth, 141; plays presenting turns of - and Divine Providence, 189.found, whole Church and all religion -ed on idea of God as one, 201.foundation, of a house, 129.fountain, 6; an impure - , 17; - from which his good flows, ~3; from what - saying and doing spring, 118; charity Ln internal man like a - of pure water, 183.four, of these - the commonwealth or society consists, 134.fragrant, something - in diversions=spiritual pleasant­ ness, 193.fraud, a v.orkman shuns - , 168.freedom, benefactions of charity = goods done in - , 184.freely, how anyone serves - , not under compulsion, 172.friendship, 40; judgments on a basis of - , 20, 163; - of charity, footnote p. 33.fructification, all quickening and - from good by means of truth, 112.FRUIT, -s of a tree (=charity) dd. to good works, 115; ­ recognised as being from a particular tree, 116; good ­ and evil - (of a tree), 118; - of use, 127; -s of trees, 132; - of a tree dd. to growth of good, 167; a bad tree can only produce - that is a likeness of its own form, 202. 121
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEfulfilling the law is what charity is (Paul), 210.full, good after repentance = a - good, open from the Lord, 207.FUNCTION, a society having one - , 80; by -s are meant various civil positions, 134; necessary and useful -s of officials under governors, 162; -s keep minds on the stretch, 192; a desire for ones - breaks off recreations, 193; those who do work of their - only for renown, 194·fury, of a soldier dies away after battle, 166. cGAIN (see honour and gain), flatterers for the sake of - , 65; lawful -s (of ship.captains), 170; uses for the sake of - , 185; diversions in those who only have an affection of - , 195; to them - is the neighbour, they love - , and they love the - derived from their office, 195.games, indoor - , 189; plays and - serve for recreation, 193.garden(s), 132, 189, 193; - in the spiritual world, 120.garland, of different coloured roses, 190.gauze, linen - , 5.genera and species of affections and of charities, 10r.GENERAL, - perception, how conditioned, also - thought, 123; all men have - perception, 123; every - constituted of particulars, how related, examples, 132; each one (in a kingdom) derives his own good of use from the - , 133; by a - is meant not only a community and its society, but also a whole region, and a kingdom, 133; in heaven the love of use inflows out of the - body, 138; the ­ inspires (heavenly qualities) into the parts, when each part=an angel, is in charity, 139; how things are given to an angel out of the - body, 140; - things in body = heart and lungs, in mind=will and understanding, 144; relation of - things to parts in human body, 143-146; when man breathes forth use in .-, he does so in every particular, 152; what is extended to uses in a - ,,ay, 162; - vessels of body, 191; how delights in body become one - thing, 191; what can be seen from merely - influx out of heaven, 202.GENERAL GOOD (see Goon).generation, several organs of - in each sex, 143.Gentile, whether Greek or - , 75 j a - loved in preference to a Christian, 89; a - who says he will do his work faithfully, 122. 122
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEgenuine, - charity, 52, 54; - truths, 107; - truth and ­ good, 150.gilded, good with hypocrites like - dung, 202.giving to the poor, 17, 185, 210.globe, whole - and its parts, how connected by shipping, 170.glory, affection and delights of - , honour, and gain, 157; the - army officers have from their use, and rank, 165; uses done from love of - , 194.glue, spiritual mind as if all stuffed up with - , 193.GOD, 8, 27, 89, 122; - is Love itself and Wisdom itself, 91 ; Life is - , 102; man mistakenly believes that he is - , and so denies - , 104; a preacher said to speak from - , 122; the Lord=- of heaven and earth and sea, 170, and none other, 171; talking with other people about - , 174; think­ ing and meditating about - , 175; good thoughts and intentions from - , 175; no one can do good that is itself good except from - , 199; the Lord=only - of heaven and earth, 201; Church and religion founded on idea of - as one, 201; - one in Essence and Person, 201; if a man were life in himself he would be - , 201; idea that man can be - stinks like a corpse, 201; belief in - neces­ sary to repentance and overcoming of evil, 203; -s help in repentance, 203; man created into image and likeness of - , 204; man wanted to be like - , perverting image and likeness of - in himself, 204; means of recovering image of - , 204; worship of - , 205; prayer "I know not my sins, 0 - , take them away," 205; acting against - , or sinning, 206; those who do good from obedience have no knowledge of - except what they hear from a preacher, 210.God.fearing, 161.gold, good with hypocrites thought to be pure - , 202.GOOD,r. good 0/ charity, 33, 59; a - of charity, or a - work, defined, 8; the - of charity is spiritual - , 56, 214; the - of charity itself is the - of the internal will, 64; the - of charity, and the - of genuine charity, 88; every - of charity is from the Lord, 105; how the - ofthe will becomes the - of charity, 108; all -s of charity are uses, 127; army commander doing - 5 of use that are -s of charity, 164; servants tasks=-s of charity proper to them and never ceasing, 172; everyone loves the neighbour from the ­ of charity in himself, V. p. 66; how a mans - may be the - of charity, 199; - that is in itself a - , and is called a - of charity, and in essence is a spiritual - , is from the Lord only, 201. 12H
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE2. good deeds, he who places charity in - dee.ds alone. cannot do uses constantly, 155; charity only in - actions or deeds, 186; those who do - from obedience do - deeds nevertheless, 210.3. good and evil, no one is able to do - and at the same time to do evil, 20; evil does not know what is - , 26; - , from knowing what is -, knows evil, 26; - follows the rejection of evil, 27-32; - and evil, their relationship, 35; - done to a wicked man, 79; an evil man can love a --- man, 122; acting from evil and not from - , 185; everyone able to do - to neighbour, an evil man as well as a - , but no one from - in himself, except from the Lord, unless he shuns evils as sins, 202; devils turn - into evil, 202; a - tree and a bad tree, 202; - that is - so far as the surface goes, but intrinsically evil, 202; so far as a man shuns evils as sins, he does -s, not from himself, but from the Lord, 202; only he who hates evil does - , 202; tree of knowledge of - and evil, 204; before a man can do ­ that is - , he must be cleansed from evils, 208; before the Lord can inflow with - , evil must first be removed, 208.4. general good, the general - , and -s of use by indivi­ duals, how related, 127-136, 138; what the general - con­ sists of (eight essentials), 130; general - comes from individuals through -s of use, 131; the -s of use which individuals perform subsist from the general - , 133; general - in accordance with -s of every kind, industries ·and pursuits, 136; in heaven everyone derives his own ­ from the general - , 138; how the general - is promoted by governors, 161; lesser general - subordinate to greater and greatest general - , 162; the general - and a business mans own - , dd. to a tree and its hidden root, 167.5. kinds 01 good, spurious, - , I, 6, 10, 207; - done for reward, 199, 209; merit·seeking - , 6; pharisaical - , 199, 209; hypocritical - , 6, 209; diabolical.-, 6; civil, moral and spiritual - , 23; degrees of - , civil, moral and spiritual, 55; spiritual - , 56, 84, 86, 21 4; moral - , 57, 86,89,214; civil -,58, 84,86,89, 214; rational -,57, 84; external - , 57; the animal - in which beasts are, 58; ones country is the neighbour according to its spiritual, moral, and civil - , 83-86; the public - , 83; the common - , 83; natural - , 85, 214; the. - of interior love, 88; the - of religion, 89; a business mans own - , and the general - , 167; impure - , either pharisaical or for reward, 199. 6. good and the Lord, or God, - from the Lord through man, 8, 10; sailors doing - from ~he Lord, 171; ­ thoughts and intentions from God, 175; no one can do ­ that in itself is - except from God, who is - Itself, 199; 124
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE the - a man does to others=- to those to whom done, but not - in him by whom done unless from God, 201; -that is called a - of charity, in its essence a spiritual - , can flow forth from man, but from the Lord only, 201 ; if the Lord were not the - a man does to the neighbour, it would not have an essence of - in it, but an essence of evil, 201 ; no subject through which the Lord produces -from Himself, other than man, 201; how the Lord inflows with - , 202; how the Lord can bring forth - through any man, and turn evil into - , 202 ; all - is from God, 202; -s of love and truths of wisdom, in themselves Divine, from the Lord and not from man himself, 204.7. good and the "eighbour, the neighbour, in a spiritual idea, is - and truth, 73, 124; in a spiritual idea - is the neighbour to be loved, 7; as many differences of neigh. bour as there are of - , and the differences of - are infini te, 74; --s according to which a man is the nei ghbour are especially spiritual -s, 77; conjunction with the neighbours - and not with his person, 124; prisoners = neighbour according to quality of their - , 166; charity =doing - to neighbour, 202; the" second" of charity = to do - to the neighbour, 209-211; wishing to do - to the neighbour, is loving him, 209; in so far as a man does not wish to do evil to the neighbour, he "ishes to do him - from charity, 209; possible to do - to the neigh. bour, still not loving him, 210; difference between not doing evil but - to neighbour, from obedience, and from affection, 210; - , in a spiritual sense=neighbour to be loved, 214.8. good be/ore and alter repe"ta"ce, - before repentance, I, 6, 10, 207; - after repentance, 10 j - before repentance is not - , nor, before repentance, is charity charity, 207; before repentance - not done from the Lord, it has not an essence of - but of evil, it appears outwardly as - , 207; - after repentance = full - , open from the Lord; qualities in it; alive; formed out of truths; its life is the - of love, 207; - after repentance is from - , towards - , and in - , 207 j to do - from the Lord before evil has been removed by repentance, impossible, 208.9. various statements about good, no one can do - from himself, 9; a man is the subject of - , and also the object of him who does --, 73; differences of - are infinite, 74; similar in respect of - , 76; having regard for the - of a country, 86; a duty to do -to ones country, 85; the - of an empire, kingdom or republic, 87; the - . of a house is the dwelling in it, 129; governors affected by the - of subjects or citizens, 161; a workman led to thinking and loving of -s, 168; when the internal man is - , 180; K 125
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE how room is made for -s from the internal man to enter. 180; benefactions of charity=all the -s done in freedom outside the scope of a mans occupation, 184; everyone sa"ed according to the quality of - or charity in him, 185; charity =doing - to others, 199, 201 ; how one should do - , and to whom, 199; man only a recipient of - , for -is of life, and - is of love, 201; unless man felt the ­ he does as being from himself, the :- would not remain in him, 201; what it has pleased the Lord to reveal, lest man should attribute to himself the - he does, 201; if a man loves -s he becomes a form of - , 202; the idea of faith alone, and that no one can do - from himself, 202; that which is said to be - in all that which is delightful, 205; cup and dish not cleansed inside still appear ~ outardly, 209; those who do - from obedience, do ­ deeds, and take lead in benefactions, etc., do not know that the affection itself of - is the reward, 210; where there is no - of life, religion does not exist, (chap. XII) 212-21 3.10. good and truth, 42-45, 51, 107; - and truth, their relationship, 107; truth is - in form, 70; the affection of truth from - is charity, 99; charity=affection of truth from - , 149; the - , from which is the affection of truth, is a desiring to do, 150; fiames=affections of - and truth so appearing, 211; because truth is of faith and - is of charity, they make one as faith and charity, understanding and will, 212; the doctrine ought to be composed of truths, and the life to be made up of - 5 , 212.I I. good oj use, a society is the neighbour according to the - of its use, 78; a man cannot become a charity unless he constantly does the - of use to the neighbour, (chap. VI) 126.157; the general - and the - of use, how related, 127-136; the - of use defined, 127; the - of use as an end with children, 129; -s of use which individuals perform subsist from the general - , 133; the -s of use which individuals perform are ministries, functions, offices, etc., 134; offices and employments regarded as to -s of use, their form, 137-142; how each one is a - of use in the heavenly form, 149-153 when a man is a - of use, he is also a charity, 151; possible to do the - of use from affection of glory, honour, and gain, 157; how a man is continually in the - of use, 158; governors continually doing a - of use to the community and individuals, 161; officials continually doing - of use, 162; affection for doing - of use is charity in its life, 162; judges doing - of use to community and individuals, 163; army com­ mander doing -s of use that are -s of charity, 164; army officers doing -s of use constantly: when the mind is 126
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE constantly in the - of use it becomes a form of charity, 165; the work of a business man =a - of use, 167; ork­ men do -s of use of service to the neighbour, 168; work of ship-captains a greater - of use than many others, 170; seamanship"a good work=a - of use, 171; having love towards neighbour, or charity, is nothing else than doing a - of use, 171; all things of charity have reference to doing the -s of use that are of anyones office, 173; those in affection for gain do not know that the - of use is anything, 195.12. good and use, the -s done by a man who is charity are -s of use done every day, 158; all uses are -s, 127; doing -s, because they are uses, 13.13. good and the will, - from the interior will, 21; spurious Gh1arity is of the ill or of - only, 54; the - of the internal ill, and the - of the external will, 62; every ­ is of the will, 64; a man is a form of charity of such a quality as, with him, - of the will is conjoined to truths of the understanding, 107-113; how the - of the will becomes the - of charity, 108; good works from the will of - through the understanding of truth, 115; a man is a man by reason of the - of his will, 214; when the - of a mans ill is loved, the man himself is being loved, 214. 14. good works, a - of charity, or a - work, defined, 8; Christian - works, 18; fruits of a tree (=charity) cfd. to - works, 115; everyone in hell compelled to do - work, 157; seamanship=a - work=a - of use, 171; those, after death, who make a great parade of having done ­ works, 185 .. goods (= property), envying anyone his - , 205. good pleasure, what charity does as a matter of obligation and not out of - , 187. good sense, in an earthly society, 139. goodwill, 40; - of charity, footnote p. 33; officials who are of - , 161­ gossip, 196. GOVERNMENT, members of the - , 80; the people are in the body of the kings - , 83; the form of - in the livi-ng body, 146. GOVERNOR, what is just (in a kingdom) is there by means of -s, and judges, 131; charity in the case of -s, 161; -s defined, 161; someone doing homage to a - , 211­ grain, a - of spiritual faith, 198. grateful, every - odour, 196.gratification, an interior sense of - in diversions from the Lord, 193. 127
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEgreat, -er and -est general good = that of kingdom or republic, 162; difference bet" een governor and official= that between -er and less, 162; work of ship-captains a -er good of use than others, 170.Greek, whether - or Gentile, 75.groups, -s of people, how governed, 161; officials appointed o·er - of the people, 162.grow, the life by v,hich plants - , 202.guiltless, - people, how guarded from harm, 163.guilty, the - evil, 163. Hhabitation, 168.hand, into the Lords - , 166.harlots, five - , 49.harm, how guiltless people are guarded from - , 163.harmonies, sound and its infiowing - , 103; - of music and singing, 189, 193.happiness, how given to an angel, 140.hate, hating, IS, 20, 208; I must not - an unfriendly or hostile country, 86.hatred, 4; hell consists of all varieties of - and of lusting, 100; he who is not a form of charity is a form of - , 100; bearing - because one is not honoured, 205:haughtiness, 207.HEAD, a governor not the - of a community, 161; - directs all things of its body from love and wisdom in itself, 161; from - to sole of foot no soundness in them, 205 love of self and arrogance=-s of all sins, 205.heal, evil not opened, and therefore not --ed, 6.healthy, a beggar driven to work, if - , 128.HEAR, the ear is not -ing itself, but the receptacle for it, 102; -ing, after death, that heaven and hell do exist, 185; diversions for the sense of -ing, 189; sensation of ~ing; 191; what evil there is in a mans good, -d in the tone of his speech, after death, 207; no knowledge, except what they - from a preacher, 210.HEART, 3; how - and lungs act as general things of the body, 144; the - gives blood to each part of the body, 146; loving the neighbour from the - , previous to repen­ tance, against mans nature, 210. 128
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEHt:A.T, the will is in the - of heaven, 107; - is good, 112; - and light of the Spiritual, "5; pure - of the sun, how turned into putrid and noisome smells, 202; a bad tree, which receives - and light from the sun, 202; heavenly -=Divine Good, 202; difference between doing good from obedience and from affection, like that between - and light by night, and by day, 210; in obedience not any - and light of love, 210; affection of love is - , 210; those in a - and light like that of the moon, 210.HEAVEN, - and hell, believed to exist, 2; each one in the -s conjoined in accordance with spiritual good, 56; a man of - , or an angel, 60; the internal will has conjunction with - , 63; - and hell, 76; the form of - is the human form, 81; before angels in the -s, 82; the third - , hich is from the first men, is in love and wisdom, hereas the second - is from the lower love called charity, 94; in ­ an angel appears in form as a charity, 97; angels of the second - , 99; the heat and light of - , 107; the entire ­ is a Man, 148; when man is not a form of - but of hell, 57; the priest to lead souls to - by truths, and thus to the Lord, 160; army officers in a higher - , 165; the Lord =God of - and earth and sea, 70-7; sailors in - 7 ; talking with other people about - , 174; thinking and meditating about - , 75; those after death hearing that - and hell do exist, 185; the Lord inflows from - into diversions, 193; the Lord=God of - and earth, 201; condition for man being formed for - , 201 ; influx of good with angels in - , 202; merely general influx out of - , 202; objects of - = good;; of love and truths of wisdom, in themselves Divine, 204; - is in good after repentance, 207; how can anything pure inflow from - before impure removed, 208; those who do good from obedience are in lowest regions of - , 210; flames that descend from - , 211; spiritual good=the Lord, - , and the Church with man, 214.HEAVENLY, - society, 76; offices and employments, regarded as to use, in the - form, 37-142; the form of - societies described, 37-38; how an earthly society corresponds to a - society, 39; who comes into a - society, 142; innumerable occupations, etc" in a - society, 42; the - form of use in the living body, 147; conjoined interiorly with infernal, and exteriorly with - , 186; - and infernal delights, 9; - delight may becounterfeited by infernal, 94; - heat and light, and the - form, 202; good after repentance is - , 207.heed, to pay, J 22.Heavenly Doctrine, New leru$a1em and it$, 9.HELL, - consists of all varieties of hatred and lusting, 100; 129
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE those who become mean and poor in the -s, 141; when man is a form of - , 157; man making himself an image and likeness of - , 204; even in - , everyone is compelled to do good "ark, 157; army officers in - , 165 how the Lord fights with spirits from - admitted to external man, ISo; the· -s abound with workhouses, 196; influx with devils III - , 202; belief that Christ redeemed from - and thus from all evil, 203_help, -ing the needy, 185, 210; Gods - in overcoming evil, 203; beseeching the Lord for - and power to resist evils, 204_herbs, 132.hereditarily, evils - acquired, 2.hereditary, sins done from delights from what is - , to be enumerated, footnote p. 66.hidden, no one can know the - things of charity in him­ self, 167­high, love of gain with those in - office, 195.higher, army officers in a - heaven, 165; if not raised into - positions, 194.highest, governors holding - positions, 161; governors the - in rank of those serving others, 161.HIMSEl.F (see AS FRO~1 H1~ISELF), man not a form of charity from - , 104; no one can know the hidden things of charity in - , 167; a workman loves - and neighbour in equal degree, 168; faculty of feeling good in - , as his own, 201 ; the Lord does not inflow into the evil of man - , but round about it, 202; the idea that no one can do good from - , 202; what man says within - when repenting, 2°3; how man turned away from the Lord to - , perverting image and likeness of God in - , and how back again, 204; a man not able from - to know which thing is evil and what thing is falsity from it, 205; in so far as anyone recoElnizes and knows what sins are, he can see them in - , confess and repent, 206; of - man acts on outermost things only, 206. historical faith, 198. history, 189. homage, someone doing - to a king, a governor, or a person in authority, 21J. home, farmers at - with their families. 169; externals of worship at - , 174. holes, water-skin all full of - , 201. honest, 168; farmers act with others according to what is - , 169; those in affection of gain externally - , but internally dishonest, 195­ 130
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEHONESTLY, - , justly, and faithfully carrying out ones work, a condition for becoming a form of charity, (chap. VII) 158-172; when a man - , justly, and faithfully carries out his ork, he is continually in the good of use, 158; servants to behave as - in absence as presence of masters, 172; obligations charity does - and willingly, 187.honesty, the - and wil1ingness of charity in obligations, 187-188.HONOUR, judgments with a view to - and gain, 20; everyone on earth places delight and good fortune in -s and wealth, 141; affection and delights of glory, - , and gain, 157; an official affected by use, and not - except for the sake of use, 162; - of victory, 164; civil obligation of - , 187; no rest except when being -ed and worshipped, 194; bearing hatred and taking revenge because one is not -ed and worshipped as a demigod, 205.hospitals, contributing to - , 17; endowing - , 210.hostile, a - country, 86.HOUSE, if some man from some kingdom is at my - , 87; the building of a - , illustrating good of use as an end in education of children. The good of a - is the dwelling in it, 129; everyone allotted a - in heaven corresponding to his work, 137; delightful views of 189; - with an offensive smell, 208.household, expenses and outlays for - necessities and uses, 187.how, - one should do good, 199; - one is able to love the neighbour, 210.HUMAN,human jorlll, 43; the form of heaven is the - , 81; a mans mind (mens) is a spirit in - , 98; offices, employ. ments, etc., in heaven in the - , 143-148; farmers become spirits in a - of charity, 169.human race, the - is the neighbour, 72; the - as the neighbour in the widest sense, 87-89; if the Lord created and finited Himself, the entire - , and each individual, would be God, 201 ;-= neighbour to be loved, in a natural sense, 215.human body, all parts of - = goods of use in a most perfect form, 143.hundred, -s paying heed to a man reputed to love his country, 122; up to fifty or a - sins to be enumerated, footnote p. 66.hungry, feeding the - , 17.hurtful, if a man does not shun evils as sins, but only as -,204· 131
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEhusbandmen, 169­hymns, prayers and - of seafaring men, 170.hypocrites, 65; - able to put on the sincerity of charity, 98; good with - , like gilded dung, 202.hypocritical, - good, 6, 209; what is -, 207.IDEA, a spiritual - dissociated from matter, space, time, and person, 42; if the mind is kept in the same -s without change, 190; - that there is a God, and that He is one, 201 ; - that Gods life can be made over to man, 201 ; the - (of faith alone) that no one can do good from himself, 202.idleness, those .wanting to live in - not tolerated in heaven, 137; they shun - in heaven, 138; a workman in charity shuns - , 168; - with those who work only for position, 194.idlers, 196.ignorance of those who do not know they are sinners, 205.ill, servants not speaking - of their masters, 172.IMAGE, all that man does from inward evil is an - of him, 6; man created into - and likeness of God, 91, 204; how a mans - is seen in the form of his affections in the spiritual world, 120; when a man is a use, he is an - of charity, 152; man perverted into - and likeness of hell, 204.imagination, phantasy or - , 123.impartially, a judge executing judgment - , 163.implant, evil removed and good -ed by repentance, 207.impose, taxes -d on subjects and citizens, 187; obligations that the laws of the kingdom - , 187.impossible for man (of himself) to remove lustings, 206.improve, the means to - a wicked man, 79.impure, pure or - delights, 191; - good, inwardly evil, 199; when man is wholly - and unclean, 208.increase, to remain in evils is to - them, 204; good inflow­ ing into evil -s it. 208.indicate, a sign -s and testifies, 182.indication, -so to anyone of what quality his charity is, 7; a sign=an - that a thing exists, 182; no internal without its sign and - , 183. 132
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEINDIVIDUAL, every - man is the neighbour, 73; the .general good exists from the goods of use performed by -s, 127- 136; -s make the general good in heaven, 138; good of use towards private -s, 158; the community and -s therein, 16" 163; - things of the body, termed members and viscera, 191; if the. Lord created and finited Himself, the entire human race, and each - by himself, would be God, 201.individually, man feels delights of body, not but as a Whole. 191.indoor games, 189.industries, 133; general good in accordance with - , 1]6.industrious, 195; a workman - , 168.infants, and children, not performing but learning goods of use, 129.INFERNAL, heavenly and - delights; 191; - delight of those who work only for position, 194; an - delight and pleasantness in diversions of those in affection for gain, 195; how man becomes an - form, 202.infernals, conjoined interiorly with - and exteriorly with heavenly, 186.infinite, the differences of good are - , 74.inflict, even" hen a judge -s a fine or penalty, 163.INnow, the Di vine can - into and be adjoined to a receptacle, 102; -ing sound and its harmonies, 103; the light of heaven -s into mans intellectual continually, 123; in heaven the love of use -s out of the general body, 138; actions of heart and lungs - into every part of the body, 144; the Lord -s from heaven into diversions, 193; how the Lord -s with good into good and evil men, angels, and devils, 202; how heat and light of sun - into various objects, 202; the Lord does not - into evil of man himself but into surrounding things, 202; anything pure cannot - until impure and unclean things are removed, 208; the Lord cannot - with good before evil is removed, 208; the Lord -s into a mans affection and gives light, 21LINFLUX, hat can be seen from merely general - out of heaven, 202; man " ho knows precepts of Decalogue are Divine laws can receive Divine - , how effected, 206; - of good before evil is removed is dangerous, 208.initiate, everyone -d into his heavenly occupation, 137; having been -d from childhood into worship of God, 205.injuring, 20.inmost, the Lord operates through - things right down to outermost, 206; - things make outermost, 206. 133
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEinnate (see D1RTH, BORN), - evils, 204.innocent, good after repentance is - , 207.inquiry made into life and uses in occupation, 185.insane, 43.inside of dish, must be cleansed, 208.inspire, carnal diversions -d within by delight of being wealthy, 195.instructing children and servants, 174.instruction, reading books of - and piety, 174.instrument, money as - of a business mans occupation, 167.instrumental, business - to money, with the Jews, 167.intellectual, the light of heaven inflows into mans - con­ tinually, 123; the - proprium = falsity horn evil, 205­intelligence, the wisdom called - , 94; the understanding or - , 95­intelligent, officials who are - , 161.intemperance, 168.intent, a man who is not - upon any work, 168; the mind ­ upon work, how relaxed, 190; mind continuously - on work, longs for rest, 191.intentions, reflecting upon ones thoughts and - , 175.intercourse, civil obligation of - , 18;; social - , 189, 193.INTERIOR, - things, 6; evil in the - will, 21 ; the - qualifies the exterior, 21; shunning evil prior and - to doing of good, 41; the mind and its - senses, 102; - perception, "5; an - affection abiding inwardly in doing goods of use, 158; conjoining interiorly with infernal and exteriorly with heavenly, but everyone deprived of exterior and left to - , 186; - state of mind in body, 191; -s of body, 191.INTF.RNAI., the - will and understanding, and the external. 62; - love turned into exterior love, 93; how mans external is made a charity, and not his - , 104; no ­ without its sign and indication, 183_INTERNAL MAN, - having to be purified, 12; if I love him on account of his life, I love him as an - , 89; charity itself is in the - , and its sign in the External, 177; general relationship of - and External man, 178-183; - is spirit, 178; - manifests itself by external, 179; how the Lord operates by means ot - upon external, in regeneration, 180; when the - is evil, and when good, 180; what the - brings about and presents in external is termed a sign, t81. 134
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEinternally, how obligations appear - and externally, 188; externally honest but - dishonest, 195.interval, what happens during the - between uses, 156.invasion, deliverance of country from hostile - , 164; security of country from - and destruction, 165.inversion, mans proprium having, by this - , become evil only, 204.invert, how man -ed his form, turning away from the Lord to self, 204; how man -s his form, and returns into state into which he was created, 204.investigation, 25; - of actions, thoughts, intentions, etc., 5, footnote. inward and outward evil, 6. INWARDLY, external good works are - evil, 17; man looking - to the Lord, and outwardly to his work, 153; an interior affection abiding - in doing good of use, 158; - in bodys sensations is wills love and affections, 191; good that is - evil, 199; loving the neighbour from the spirit, that is, -,210; loving a person outwardly and not -,211. irrational, to think of man as God is - and abominable, 201. Isaiah quoted), 12, 26, 209.jests, seemly - that expand the mind, 189.Jews, business quality of the - , 167.John the Baptist preached repentance, 26.JUDGE(S), 20, 29, 131; charity in the case of - , 163; - who sell justice, 195; an administrant - in workhouses in hells, 196.judgment, how - and justice prevail, 161; how a just judge executes - , 163.judgments,- on a basis of friendship, etc., 20; judges, if they deliver - of justice, become charities in form, 163.judicial, various - affairs (in a kingdom), 78.jurisdiction, governors who have - in civil affairs, 161; - of an official, 162.JUST, what is - (in a kingdom), 130, 135; what is - is there by means of governors and judges, 131; what is - in an earthly society, 139; judges think, speak, and act from what is - , 163; farmers at home act according to what is - , 169; ship.captains - and honest in dealings with sailors, and - in dealing with foreigners, 170; laws kept not from a love of what is - , 188. 135
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEJUSTICE, laws relating to - , 83, how judgment and - prevail, 161; judges who deliver judgments of - become charities in form, 163; the oivil la" s of - , e. g. those of the Decalogue, 169; laws of - as obligations, 188; judges who sell - , 195·justification and salvation, 203.JUSTLY, passing judgment - , 29; a farmer doing his work - and faithful1y, 30; societies to administer civil affairs - , 78; honestly, - , and faithful1y carrying out ones work, a condition for becoming a form of charity, (chap. VII) 158.172; when a man honestly, - , and faithfully carries out his work, he is continually in the good of use, 158. Kkeenness, how desire of the mind loses its - , 190.kill, 171., 208, 210; delights of evil dd. to poisons that - , 2.killing, 88.kindness, 40.KING, the - is in the supreme position, 83; the people are in the body of the -s government, 83; an amhassador, representing his - and therefore the kingdom, 87; whether army commander is - or archduke, 164; even a - ought to sen-e the Lord, 172; like someone doing homage to a -, 2II.KINGDO}I, various societies in a - enumerated, 78; a regarded as a man, 80; anyone - presented to view before angels as one man, 84; not a duty to do good to other -s outside ones own, 85; one - does not desire the good of another, 85; empires, -s, and republics, 87; some man from some - or other, 87; those in other -s, 88; the general good of a society or - , 130; -=a general, 133; governors in -s, 161; greater or greatest general good=that of a - or republic, 162; obligations that the laws of the - impose, 187.kinsman, 75.kinship, spiritual - , 76, - does not make the neighbour, 85.kneeling, saying prayers - , 174.knite, 5 I.KNOW, -ing sins, I , 3, 4, 205; a desiring to - for the sake of doing, 150; -ing evils, 181; historical faith, in itself -ing, 198; -ing what evils are sins, 203; in so far as anyone does not recognize and - what sins are, he sees no otherwise than that he is without sin, 205; prayer, " I 136
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE not my sins, 0 God, take them away," 205; a man could, if he v,anted to, recognize and - his sins, 205; in so far as anyone recognizes and -s what sins are, r.e can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord, and repent of them, 206.KNOWLEIJGE, societies for the advancement of - , 78; man has eaten of the tree of - , 93; -of ship-captains, 170; signification of tree of -,- of good and evil, 204; no one has any - of affection of love towards neighbour, 210; those who do good from obedience, not affection, have no - of faith, love, or God, except what they hear from a preacher, 210. L labour, work and - of a workman, 168. lamb, army commander after battle cfd. to a - , 164; -s and sheep, 195. land, nati ve - , 89; those whose life is spent on the - cfd. wi th seafarers, 170. large, a society small or - , 78, 215. LAW, civil -s, 58, 195; civil, moral, and spiritual -s, 59; the -s of a country, relating to justice, and to the struc­ ture of the state, 83; this - (of generals and particulars), 133; the - that man is born to become a charity, 158; governors who enact -s of use and are first in livmg subject to them, 161; how a just judge regards the - , 163; everyone who lives according to the - to be pro­ tected, 163; farmers regard civil -s o·f justice as Divine, and obey them, 169; obligations that the -s of the king­ dom impose, 187; those not in charity not afraid of the - in obligations, 188; -s of justice, as obligations, 188; evils contrary tq Divine -s, 2°4; man who knows that the precepts of the Decalogue are Divine -s, 206; fulfilling the - is what charity is (Paul), 210; those who do not do evil to neighbour out of obedience to Divine - , 210.lawful gains of ship-captains, 170.LEAD, the priest to - souls to heaven, and thus to the Lord, by means of truths, 16o; he who serves faithfully is led by the Lord, 172; -ing a new life, 179; everyone led to society where his affection is, 185; those who do good from obedience take the - in benefactions, 210.learn, children -ing to perform goods of use, 129.less, -er general good subordinate to greater and greatest, 162; difference between governor and official = that between greater and - , 162. 137
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEliars, every truthful man loved by - , 122.libations, 194.lie, those who - abed thinking of gossip, etc., 196.LIFE, the evils of - , 33; doctrine and - , 89; the form of a mans charity is from his - , 96; the - of a man who is to be regenerated, exists from -, thus from the Lord who is - itself, 102; the Lord is the Way, the Truth, and the - , 102; " As the Father hath - in Himself ... ," 102; man created into a form receptive of - , 1°3; a mans - is in everything he thinks, wills, says, and does, 119; no one can act from any other - than h is own, 119; the necessaries for - in a kingdom or society, 130, 133; the necessaries for - , how given to an angel, 140; genuine truth looks to - with the neighbour, 150: when mans - and soul = love of use, 152; how a man is i:-r good of use from earliest age to the end of his - , 158 j affection for doing goods of use is charity in its - , 162; a soldier commends his - into the Lords hand, 166; talking with other people about eternal-, 174; leading a new - , 179; enquiry into what - had been in occupation, 185; every grateful odour from - of spiritual love, or from - of love of use, 196; charity is the - , soul, and essence of faith, 198; man only a recipient of - , for if he were ­ in himself he would be God, 201; - cannot be made over to man as his own, 201; the -s form of devils, 202; the - from which plants grow, 202; a man whose -s form is inverted, 202; love with everyone makes the form of his - , 202; would conflict with the delight o,f his - , 205; - of forms of good = good of love, 207; where there is no good of - , religion does not exist, (chap. XII) 212-213; religion is religion from a - in accordance with doctrine, and the - ought to be made up of goods, 212; the truths of faith teach what is to be believed and done, so that a mans lot may be eternal - , 213; it is said" the Church" on account of doctrine, and "religion" on account of - in accordance therewith, 213; those who by both doc­ trine and - are in faith separate from charity, 213; ­ of moral, civil, and natural good derived from spiritual good, 214.Life, the Doctrine of - for the New Jerusalem, (cited), 2, 9, 12, 202-203·LIGHT (lux), eye is DOt - itself, but can receive - , 102; eye created into a form receptive of - , 103; not in the - of truth, but in a fatuous light (lumen), 1°5; the under­ standing is in the - of heaven, 107; they who are in charity are in - , or they love - , 112; - is truth, 112; truth in the - , and in the shade, 113; heat and - of the 138
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE spiritual, 115; how - affects perception and thought, 123; - from heaven, and - from man or the world, 123; rain. bow more pleasing than - itself, 190; pure - of sun, how turned into hideous colours, 202; heavenly -= Divine Truth, 202; difference between doing good from obedience and from affection, like that between heat and - by night and by day, 210; in obedience there is no heat of love, nor its - ; those in obedience in a heat and - like that of the moon; the - of their understanding is in the shade, 210; love like a flame from hich there is - in truths, 2II ; the Lord inflows into mans affection and gives - , 211.light (lumen), a fatuous - , 105.LlKENESS, man created into the image and - of God, 9, 204; a - of a mans form, 114, II9; fruit that is a - of a bad trees form, 202; man perverted into image and - of hen, 204.linen gauze, S.links, of a chain, 191.lion, army commander in battle dd. to a - , 164.listening to sermons, 74.live, if a soldier -s, he -s in the Lord, 166; a man would rather die than - perceptibly from another in himself, . 201; being saved, - to eternity, 201. living, necessarie" for - , 196; those - in a Christian manner, 210; good makes everyone of its truths - , 2°7; no one can have a faith that has anything - in it, unless he shuns evils as sins, 210. loathe, those who - their offices, 194. LOOK, -iug to the Lord, I, 2, 8, 53, (chap. VII) 58.72, 73, 199, 204, 208; -ing to the Lord and shunning evils as sins, 204, 208; -ing to God and shunning evils as sins, 185; -ing backwards avay from the Lord, 2°4; man cannot be purified from evils if he only -s to the Lord and prays, 204; if a single object or colour is -ed at continuously, 190.THE LORD,I. the Lords actions and sayings, - preached repentance, 26; -s parable of the man wounded by robbers, So; ­ taught both to do and to believe, 203; - taught repentance, 203.2. good and charity from the Lord, good done from and by - , 8, 0; a man ought to be a charity in form, not from himself, but from - , 102-106; charity is of - with man, 106; no one can have Charity except from - , 201; good of chari ty from - only: - must be in the good =the 139
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE Good, 201 ; how good proceeding from - can be mans: produces good from Himself, through man: it has pleased - to reeal this in Word, 201; no one can have charity from - unless he shuns evils as sins, 202; no one able to do good to neighbour except from - , 202; - inflows v. ith good into devils in the same way as with angels, but they do not receive it, 202; an infernal form which does not receive any good from - , 202; so far as a man shuns evils, he does goods, not from himself, but from - , 202; good, before repentance, not done from - but from man, 2°7; after repentance good is open from - Himself; there is - and heaven in it, 207; before - can inflow with good, evil must be removed, 208; spiritual good=-, heaven, and the Church with man, 214,3. the Lord in relation to man, conjunction of man with ­ by charity, Ord. and Arr. I I ; looking to - and shunning evils, I, 2, 8, (chap. VII) 158,172, 173, 99, 204, 208; look· ing to - and believing in Him, 33; - enters a man after the devil is cast out, 10; a mans life exists from - who is Life itself, 102; - does not dwell in the things of a mans proprium, 104; man looking inwardly to - , and outwardly to his work, 153, the priest to lead souls by truths to heaven, and so to - , ,60; soldier raises his mind to - , before battle, 166; how a soldier dies or lives in - , 166; - sees the hidden things of charity in a man, ,67, a workman in charity led by - to thinking and loving goods, 168, farmers who give thanks to - for blessings, and are continually looking to - , 169; ship.captains render praise and thanks to - , 170; seafarers counselled to pray to - , because He is God of heaven and earth and sea, 170; sailors exhorted to approach and pray to - , because none other is God of heaven and earth and sea, 171; sailors accepted by - ; if they die, they die in - , 171; even a king ought to serve - , 72; so far as anyone serves faithfully, he is loed and led by - , 72; ­ operates by means of Internal man on external, and fights against devil, ,80; a man ought to shun evils as sins as from himself, while doing so nevertheless from - , 203; - from His Divine Love in the continual endeavour to reform and regenerate man, 203; man made a recipient of -s love and wisdom, 2°4; how man turned himself from - , and began to love himself more than - , 2°4; means provided by - so that man may not perish on this account, 2°4; shunning evils as sins=because they are against - , 204; confessing sins before - , 206; - brings about conjunction with Him; - gies man to do it as of himself, 206; - operates through inmost things right down to outermost, and removes concupiscences, 206; inflows into a mans affection and gives light, 21 I. 140
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE4. general statements about the Lord, when it pleases 84; - is the Way, the Truth, and the Life, 102, 160; , from whom is heaven, is Man, 148; -=the Word, and the Door (of sheepfold), 160; Love and Wisdom in itself= the only - , 161; - distinguishes between uses done for self and for neighbour, 185; - inflows from heaven into diversions, 193; - named because He is the Only God: trinity is in Him alone, 201; - cannot create and finite Himself in another, 201 ; - does not inflow into evil itself, but into surrounding things, 202.the Lord, Doctrine 01 the New Jerusalem concerning, referred to, 201-lot, a workman content with his - , 168; truths of faith from "ord teach how a mans - may be eternal life, 213.LOVE,love to the Lord, - towards neighbour and - to the Lord, Ord and Arr. 12; from - to the Lord man has turned away to wisdom, 93; how man began to - himself more than the Lord, 204.love 01 neighbour, - towards neighbour and - to the Lord, Ord. and Arr. 12; not -ing the neighbour (examples) 122, 123; -ing the neighbour from charity, 124.125; a workman -s himself and neighbour in equal degree, 168; laws kept from - of what is just, - of neighbour, 188; charity, or - towards the neighbour=doing good to others, 199; Paul on - towards neighbour, 199 footnote; who is -ing neighbour when he hates, defrauds, slanders, etc. ?, 208; not wishing to do evil to neighbour, is -ing him, 210; wishing to do good to neighbour, is -ing him, 209; -ing the neighbour, how a man comes into that spiritual - by removing evil first, 210; difference between not doing evil to neighbour from obedience and from affection of - , 210; erroneous belief that he who has faith -s the neighbour, 210 how the neighbour is to be -d in accordance with his good, spiritual, moral, civil, and natural, 214; good, in spiritual sense:= neighbour to be -d, 214; what neighbour to be -d is, in natural sense, 215.love 01 sell, man is born into the of self, 2; how man began to - himself more than the Lord, 204; - of self and arrogance=heads of all sins, 205.love 0/ use, work in Heaven done from - of use, 138; when mans life and soul=- of use, 152; uses done not from - of use but - of self, not from - of neighbour but - of glory, 194; the life of spiritual - , or the life of the - of use = source of eery grateful odour, 196. L 141
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE love and wisdom, God is - itself and Wisdom itself, 91; man created to be a form of - and wisdom, 91; the life of wisdom is - , 92; the third heaven is in - and wisdom, 94; head directs body from - and wisdom in itself, 161; - and Wisdom in itself is the only Lord, 161; man made a recipient of the Lords - and wisdom, but wanted to be actual - and wisdom, 204. various statements about love, - of country, 85, 86, 122; possible for wicked people to - each other mutually, 88; the good of interior - , 88; -ing a GelHile on account of his life, not his doctrine only, 89; internal - turned into exterior - , 93; when man has become external his - is called charity, 94; spiritual-, but not celestial-, is charity, 95; a man after death becomes his own - , that is the affection of his own - , 97; from what - saying and doing spring, ll8; the - of what is lower, 123; how a man may turn aside to all -s and lustings therefrom, 156; a priests - is diligently to teach truths from the Word, 160; a judge like a father who corrects his children if he -s them, 163; army commander does not - war, but peace, 164; how an officer -s the soldiers under him, 165 ; a business man -s his fellow-citizens from the charity of which he is a form, 167; - of workmen for their work, for goods and the means to them, 168; farmers - their fields, vineyards, crops, because they are blessings, 169; how sailors in heaven - one another, 171; he who serves faithfully is -d and led by the Lord, 172; delight is said of - , and the wills affection therefrom, 193; quality of ­ in diversions of those in affection for gain, 195; his ­ forms spiritual part of man, 202; his form if he -s good, or evil, 202; the Lord, from His Divine - , continually in endeavour to reform and regenerate man, 203; the sensual -s things of the world, 204; goods of - and truths of wisdom, in themselves Divine, from the Lord, and not from man himself, 204; every man -s his proprium=evil and falsity; everything -d is delightful, 205; those in belief that man is saved by faith alone have no knowledge of - , 210; - in the spiritual world appears from afar as a flame; the affection itself of - is like a flame, 2ll; outwardly -ing a person without inwardly -ing him, 2ll; when the good of a mans will is being -d, the man himself is being -d, 214.Love and Wisdom, Angelic Wisdom concertling the Divi,.e, 92 , 101, 197.lovely, good after repentance is - , like a - and beautifully­ coloured flower, 207.lower, charity brought forth into resulting or - things, 115; mans - thought, 123. 142
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCElowest, those in - regions of heaven, 210.lungs, how heart and - act as general things of the body, 44.lust, the sensual and its - , 204; every man -s only after what is evil, 210.LUSTING, - and its delight, 24; hell consists of all varieties of hatred and of - , 100; all loves and the -s therefrom, 156; when man is not a charity but a - , 157; those who are -s and appetites, 196; the Lord operates to remove the -s that are the roots of evil; if a man of himself removed outermost things, the -s would still remain, 206.luxury, 168.luxuries, 194. MMachiavellians, 5 footnote.made, man - so that he might bea recipient of the Lords love and wisdom, 204.maid-servants (see servants).malignant and noxious plants, 202.MAN, the old and the new - , 36; - is a - from good and truth, 45; a - is the neighbour, 72; a -- in composite form, 72, 79; a kingdom regarded as a - , 80; a society, in heaven, and on earth, as one - , 81.82; - is the subject of charity, (chap. V) 90.125; - created to be a form of lOve and wisdom, 91 ; for a - to be a - he ought to be a charity in form, 93; the Divine cannot be appropriated to - , 102 in his interior perception - himself is a - , I IS; a heavenly society in respect of uses appears like a - , 147; the heavenly form in least and greatest things= a - , 148; the entire heaven, every society, each angel= a - , because the Lord is - , 148; a - in himself, and in his proprium, is nothing but evil, 201; a - is only a recipient of life, and of good, 201; - is finite and created, therefore there can be no good from - , only from the Lord, 201; no other subject than - through whom the Lord produces good, 201; a - would rather die than live perceptibly from another in himself, 201; if he felt good was not from himself, but from the Lord, he would believe himself to be not a - , 201 ; the Lord does not inflow into evil of the - himself, but into surrounding things, 202; - created into image and likeness of God, a recipient of love and wisdom, 204; before repentance good not done from the Lord, but from the - , 207; inflowing good brought into operation by means at - , 208; it appears as if love towards the neighbour fights against evils, and SO it does, 14.3
    • GE:-<ERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE but not before the - is in it, 210; a - is not a - by reason of face and body, but by reason of good of the will, 214; a - is a - by reason of his Sopiritual good, and moral and civil and natural good therefrom and not separately, 214; the first me", 94.manifest (verb), how the internal man -s itself by means of external, 179.manifestly, quality of good before repentance recognized after death, 207.manifold, various civil affairs which are - , 78.manners, speech, etc. (of a kingdom) = rational good, 84.manual work, 189.mark (verb) , a sign -s and signifies, 182.masters, no one can serve two - at the same time, 38; how a man serves two - , 156; nurses and - (of children), 129; servants and - , 172.material, a - man, 98; ....,.. covering, 98; perception from the proprium is - , 123.matter, 42.meadows, 132, 195.meals, 189.mean, those who become - and poor in the hells, 14I.meaning of " they shall have their reward," 210.MEANs, business man does not love the - more than the work, 167; the - to goods, which are truths, 168; - pro­ vided by the Lord that man may not perish, 2°4; two ­ by which man can be purified from evils, looking to Lord and shunning evils as sins, 204.meditating, thinking and - about God, heaven, etc., 175.member, - of the government, 8o; a useless - of a common· wealth, 128.members, one man, whose - are the individuals therein, 80; the form of charity of an angel in each of his - , 97; external - of the human b.ody, 143; - of the body, [44, 191.memory, 105.menservants (see servants).merchants, 202; - who love gain, 195.merchandise, ships and the - therein, 170.merciful, army commander mild and - after battle, 164.merit (noun), 8, [04; claiming - for performing acts of worship. 205.merit (verb), what an officer has not -ed, 165; those who think they - reward for benefactions, 2[0. 144
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEmerit-seeking, - good, 6; good works done before evils are shunned as sins are - , 7.mice, 195.mild, army commander - and merciful after battle, 164.:IIND (mens), after death a mans - may be a charity, is a spirit in human form, 98; the - and its interior senses, 102; more things of the - than of the human body, 143; when the - is constantly in goods of use it becomes a form of charity, 165; external things of worship either of the body or the - , 173; external things of worship of - done in will and thought but cohere with external things of body, 173; how the - intent on work is relaxed by diversions, 90; how the - when resting descends into the body and seeks delights, 19 ; - and body, how related in delights and sensations, 19; -s of all kept on the stretch to be relaxed, etc, by diversions, 192; spiritual ­ closed, and as if stuffed up with glue, with those not in charity, 193; the form of a mans - , in respect of its spiritual things, when infernal, 202; the sensual draws the - away from objects of heaven, 204.)IIND (animus), a conjunction of -s by love, 4; the - ef a soldier before and during battle, ,66; diversions of charity =enjoyments and pleasures for recreating , (chap. XI) 189-196; how the - is affected and expaQ.ded by diversions, 189; how the - is bent by affection in employment, 190; no rest of - for those who work for position, 194.ministers, benefiting - , 17, what is Divine (in a kingdom) is there by means of - , 131.ministries=activities of the priesthood, 134, 135; - etc. keep minds on the stretch, 92.ministry, how a priest does the work of the - , 160.mirror,s·misfortunes, of a business man, 167.modesty of charity, footnote p. 33.money, as principal or instrumental, in the case of the busi. ness man and Jews, 167.moon, those doing good from obedience are in heat and light like that of - and stars by night, in lowest regions of heaven, 210.)JORAL, civil, - , and spiritual laws, 59; civil, - , and spiritual good, 23, 55, 83, 86, 214; a man not a man by reason of - , civil, and natural good separate from spiritUal good, 214; such as a mans spiritual good is, such is his - , civil, and natural good; these three goods derive their 145
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE life solely from spiritual good, 214; - good, which is human good itself, 57; - good without spiritual good is external good, 57; - good in accordance with the state of a mans reason, 60; in accordance with his - good a man is above worldly and lower than heavenly, 60; the good of its religion and of its - qualities, 87; - good and civil good, without religion, are merely external, 89; the affection of rational or - truth, I l l ; what is - (in a kingdom), 130, 135; what is - is there by means of what is Divine and what is just, 31; what is - and upright in an earthly society, 139; plays presenting ­ virtues, 189.morning, in the good of use from - to evening, 158; farmers who rise early in the - , 169; - and evening prayers of seafaring men, 70; saying prayers - and evening, 74.morrow, how a business man thinks of the - , 167.mother,8s·motive (origo), good works from what -? 185movement, 114.music, how harmonies of - and singing affect the mind, 189; how harmonies of - and singing serve for recreation, 193.mutual services of sailors in heaven, 71. N naked, clothing the - , 17. name (verb), the Lord -d, because He=only God, 201. nation, precepts with all -s in the universe with whom there is religion, 206. native land (see country), 89. narrow, wide and - functions of governors and officials, 162. NATURAL, men so - they are like animals, 43; in a - idea, a man is the neighbour, 73; estimations from - good, 85; the affections of civil or - truth, I l l ; spiritual and ­ delights, 191; something - in which there is nothing spiritual, 209; those who do good from obedience are - , while those who do it from affection are spiritual, 210; neighbour to be loved in accordance with - good derived from spiritual good, and not separate from it, 214; what the neighbour to be loved is, in a - sense, 215.nature, .- of affections displayed in spiritual world, 185; loving neighbour from heart, previous to repentance, i against mans - , 210. 146
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCENECESSARIES, - for life, work, and protection in a. kingdom, 130, 133; - are there by means of all kinds of work and commerce, 131; - for life produced by workmen, 136; ­ for all kinds of work produced by business men, 135; ­ for life and all kinds of work, how given to an angel, 140; employments performed solely for the sake of - for living, 196.necessary, - and useful functions of officials, 162; - for a man to repent, 208.NECESSITIES, various - and utilities provided by workmen, 168; various - and uses in the commonwealth, 187; various household - and uses, 187.need, someone in - , 40.needy, the, 17, 185, 210.NEIGHBOUR,deftnitions 0/ the neighbour, the - to be loved is, in a spiritual idea, good and truth, 42; good of the internal and external wills making one is the - , 66; truth is the -, so far as it makes one with good, 67; good is the ­ to be loved, 71; in a spiritual idea, good is the - , 73, 124; in a natural idea a man is the -,73; a society, small or large, is the - according to the good of its use, 78; various uses as the - , 79; ones country is the - accord· ing to its spiritual, moral, and civil good, 83.86; the human race is the - in the widest sense, 87; what is just (with judges) =the -, 163; guiltless people, who are the - , 163; to an army officer, his country is the - , 165; prisoners as the -, after victory, 166; gain is the - to those who sell uses, 195; - to be loved in accordance with his spiritual good, and moral, civil, and natural good therefrom; consequently it is good that, in spiritual sense =-, 214; in natural sense, - to be loved=fellow-citizen, a society, also ones country and the human race, 215.degrees and distinttions 0/ neighbour, the quality of the - in accordance with good, 50; not every man is - in the same way as another, 50; distinctions in regard to the -, 51; one man not the - in the same degree as another, 55; the - in a narrow and a wide sense, 72; as many differences of - as there are of good, 74.love 0/ neighbour, not loving the -, described, 15; the ­ can be loved from what is not chari ty, illustrated by examples, 122-123; the - loved from charity in a man, 124-125; for a man to love the - he must be a charity in form, 125; a workman loves himself and - in equal degree, 168; love towards the - , or chari ty = a good of use, 171; - not loved by those who commit evils of Decalogue, 171; law,; kept not from love of - , 188; uses 147
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE done not from love of - , but love of glory, J94; everyone loves the - from the good of charity in himself, V. p. 66; charity, or love towards the -=doing good to others, J99; Paul on love towards the - , 199 footnote; - not loved by those who break precepts of Decalogue, 208; whether love towards the - or shunning evils should be first, 208; not wishing to do evil to -=Ioving him, 2JO; wishing to do good to-=Ioving him, 209; how man loves the - , by not doing evil, first from obedience, and afterwards from affection, 2JO; loving the - from the spirit, inwardly, 2JO.various statements about tile neigllbollr, not wishing to do evil to the - is of charity, J4; wishing to do good to the - is of charity, J7; everyone, whether Greek or Gentile, is the - according to his good, 75; the - is according to spiritual kinship and relationship, 76; birth does not make anyone the - , nor kinship, nor relationship, 85; wicked people, robbers, and devils are -s among themselves, 88; a man cannot become a charity unless he constantly does the good of use to the - , (chap. VI) J26-J57; genuine truth looks to life with the - , ISO; judge doing goods of use to community and individuals, thus to the - , J63; workmen do goods of use, of serv.ice to the - , J68; uses for the sake of the - , J85; slanders against their -s if they do not make libations in their honour, J94; how the good a man does -to the - must be from the Lord and not from mans proprium, 20J ; everyone able to do good to the - , but only from the Lord, 202; slandering the - out of enmity, a sin, 205; good after repentance=some use to the - , 207; the" second" of charity=to do good to the - , 209-2JJ; in so far as a man does not wish to do evil to - , he wishes to do him good from charity, 209; the" second" of charity =to do good to the - , 2JO.NEW, the old man and the - , 36; leading a - life, J79; how, step by step, man becomes - , and is regenerated, J80; how man becomes spiritual and a - creature, 2JO.New Jerusalem and its Heavenly Doctrine, 9.news, J8g.newspapers, J89.night, heat and light by - from moon and stars, 210.noisome smells, 202.nostril, 202.noxious, malignant and - plants, 202.number, the forms of charity unlimited in - , 99.numerous, sins so - a man could not tell them all, 205.nurses, 129. 148
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE oOBEDIENC,:, civil obligation of - , 187; difference between not doing evil to neighbour from - , and from affection, 210; in - there is not any of the heat and light of love, 210; they who do good from - are doing it from fear of punish­ ment; are those being reformed; they take the lead in benefactions, etc., and think they merit reward, 210.obey, farmers - Decalogue as Divine, 169.OBJECT, the - of charity, (chap. IV) 72; a man is the of him who does good, 73; sight goes if a single - is looked at continuously, 190; light of sun inflowing into -s in which all things are disordered, 202; the sensual admits from the world -s it desires; draws the mind away from -s of heaven = goods of love and truths of wisdom, 204.OBLIGATION, -s of charity, (chap. X) 187188; -s of charity enumerated, 187; civil -s enumerated and defined, 187; when charity is inwardly in every - , 187; what charity does as a matter of - and not out of good pleasure, 187; -s with those who are not in charity, 188.oblige, laws kept because they are -d to, 188.obscene talk, 175.OCCUPATION, various -s, 134; everyone initiated into his ­ on entering heaven, 137; he who applies himself to some - from an affection of charity comes into a heavenly society, 141; benefactionsofcharity=goods done in freedom outside the scope of a mans - , 184; - , inquiry as to how its uses were done, 185.odour, every grateful - from life of spirituallove=use, 196.officers, charity in the case of - under an army cam· mander, 165; army - in heaven, and - in hell, 165.OFFICE, by -s are meant the various professions, businesses, and positions of service, 134; -s and employments as to goods of use make a form corresponding to the heavenly form, 137-142; how each one is a good of use in accordance with the scope of his - or employment, 149-153; the work of ones - or employment, how done in order to become a form of charity, (chap. VII) 158,172; the goods of use that are of anyones - , 173; -s etc. keep minds on the­ stretch, 192; how those who love gain regard their -, 195; uses in -s of those in affection of gain, 195.OFFICIALS, - under governor appointed by him over groups of the people, 161-162; charity in the case of - under governors, 162; - who love gain, 195.old, the - man and the new, 36. 149
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE ONE, when the internal and external wills make a - , 66; a· society having - function=- composite man, 80; every society in heaven=- man, 81 ; a society on earth=- man, before angels, 82; ones country as - thing, its laws framed for - man, 83; all parts of human body felt as a - , 143; external things of mind and body in worship cohere and make - , 175; the Lord teaches, He and Father are - , He is - only God, 201 ; idea that God is - ; God - in Essence and Person, 201; the Church and religion make - like truth and good, faith and charity, under. standing and will, 212. open, evil not -ed, and therefore not healed, 6; the ulcer is -ed and healed, 25; good after repentance=a full good, - from the Lord Himself, 207. operate, the Lord -s by means- of Internal man upon External, 180; the Lord -s through mans inmost things right down to outermost and removes lustings, 206.opinions, books containing - on history and philosophy, 189. opposites, how charity perishes by reason of its - , 156. ORDER (see disorder), the quality and - of a general depen. dent on the quality and - of its parts, 132; how places are -ed in heaven, 137; every society a series of affections in the - of the heavens, 137; parts of the human body in their own series and - , 143. origin, the - of evil, that man turned himself backwards, away from the Lord, and towards himself, 204; Churchs teaching that a man .is a sinner from his very - and subsequent birth, 205. orphans, assisting widows and - , 17.other, the Lord, and none -=God, 171; how those in affection for gain look on - people, 195; man has to see what evil and falsity are, from some - source than himself, 205..outlays, expenses and - for household, 187.outermost, the Lord operates right down to - things, and removes lustings; if a man of himself were to remove ­ things, the lustings would remain, 206.; of himself man acts on - things only, 206.outlet, if there is no - , water stagnates, 183. outside, benefits - the scope of a mans occupation, 184; benefactions are - the man, 185.outward, inward and - evil, 6; charity in - appearance, 40. outwardly, man looking inwardly to the Lord, and - to his work, 153; good that - has the appearance of good, but inwardly is evil, 199, 207; doing homage, and - loving and not inwardly loving a person, 21 I. 150
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEovercome (see conquer), in so far as the devil is - , [80; fighting and -ing evils, 203.OWN, after death every man comes among his -, 76; the Lord dwells in that which is His - , [04; the Lord Him- self is in what is His - , 201; different parts of the body in their - series and their - order, [43; a governor acting in his - position, [61; an official doing his - work, 162; how a business man contributes to the general good out of his - , 167; life cannot be made over to man as his - , 20[ ; faculty of feelHlg good in himself, as from himself, and therefore as his - , 201 ; a man loves his - evil and falsity, 20$.owners of ship, 170. ppaintings, 43.palaces, - in heaven, more or less magnificent, 137; delight- ful views of -, [89.palliative curing, 2$-parable, of the man wounded by robbers, 50.parade, make a great: those, after death, who - of having done various good works, [8$.parents, man born into evil from -, 204.PART, such as the -s are, such is the general, 132; the general inspires (heavenly qualities) into the -s, when each -==an angel who is in charity, 139; all -s of the human body == goods of use in a most perfect form, 143; relation of general things to -s of human body, 143-146; how each - takes its portion from the general body, by means of the blood, 146; conjunction and communication of whole globe and its -s by means of shipping, 170; the spiritual - of man for!lled by love, 202.PART[CULAR, generals and -s, how related, examples, 132; when man breathes forth use in general, he does so in every -, 1$2; - sections of a community or state, 158; what is extended to uses in a - way, 162.Paul, (quoted), 16; (referred to), 199 footnote, 209; - taught repentance, 203; - on love towards the neighbour, and fulfilling the law, 210.pay, ship-captains content with their -, 170.payment, obligations ==---<>f taxes and duties, etc., [87; defrauding in -s, 188.peace, attitude of army commander to war and -, 164; no - for those who work only for position, 94.pebble, 203. 151
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEpenalty(ies), 79; the beginning and foundation of civil good is on account of - , 58; when a judge inflicted a fine or a - , 163; public - , 195.PEOPLE, 189; the - are in the body of the kings govern­ ment, 83; - on earth, 141; groups of the - , how governed, 161; officials appointed over groups of the - , 162; talking with other - about charity and faith, etc., 174; how those in affection for gain look on other - , 195; -heard declaring they were sinners, 205.perceptibly, a man would rather die than live from another, 201.PERCEPTION, - , which is faith in its essence, 105; the form of charity is first in a mans interior - , 115; how general - exists; ... all men have it, 123; - from the proprium, 123; - of delights: understandings - makes sensation, 191; pleasantness said of wisdom, and the understandings - therefrom , 93.perfect, parts of body in a most - form, 143.perish, how charity ·--es by its opposites, 156; if the internal man does not fight with external, charity -es, 183; means provided by the Lord that man may not - , 204.Person, the Divine Trinity in the Lords - , 201 ; God is one in Essence and - , 20.person, 42; one man is not the neighbour more than another in respect of his - merely, 74; conjunction with the neighbours good and not with his - , 124; no distinction of -s in respect of charity, 166.pervert, man -ing the image and likeness of God in himself, 204; how man continues in a --ed state, 204.phantasy or imagination, 123.pharisaical good, 199, 209.Pharisees, 12.philosophy, ,89­piety, reading books of instruction and - , 174; external In worship and - not necessarily a sign of charity ,184.pious uses, 17, 185.pirates, ship-captains have nothing to do with - , 170.place, - in heaven in accordance with use, 37; -s of worship, 174, 2[0.plague, idleness shunned as a - in heaven, 138.plants, influx of suns heat and light with - , 202.play (verb), games -ed with dice, balls, or cards, ,89.plays, - presenti:;:g moral virtues, 189; - and games serve for recreation, 193­ 152
    • ,GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEpleasant, uses as - as dung to swine, or mice to cats, 195.pleasantness, something fragrant in diversions=spiritual - , 193; - said of wisdom and understandings perception therefrom, 193; an infernal delight and - in diversions of those in affection for gain, 195.pleasing, rainbow more - than light itself, 190; good after repentance is - , 207.pleasure (see good pleasure).PLEASURES, diversions of charity = various enjoyments and ­ of bodily senses, (chap. XI) J1i9·1g6; source of enjoyments and - , 191; origin of all delights and - , 191; sensuous - , 194; like asses, not seeing any - in meadows except to feed, 195.pleasurable things of interiors of body, 191.plunder (verb), 195; - the neighboUl, 15, 171.plundering(s), 20; soldiers averse to unjust - , 166.plural, charities in the - , 101.poison, delights of evils dd. to - , 2.poor, giving to the - , 17, 185, 210; those who become mean and - in the hells, 141.port, at which a ship calls, 170.portion, how each part takes its - in the body, 146.POSITION, uses for the sake of - , 185; diversions of -s and employments, 190; diversions of those who only have an affection for - , 194; if not raised into higher -s, they loathe their offices, 194.POWER, - of a kingdom, 85; how man receives - to resist evils, 203; beseech the Lord for help and - to resist evils; this - never denied, 204.praise, - of ship.captains for the Lord, 170; those who work so that they may be -d and promoted, 194.pray, seafarers counselled to - to the Lord, 170; man can· not be purified from evils if he only looks to the Lord and -s, 204.PRAYER, -s and hymns of seafaring men, 170; saying -s kneeling, 174; saying -s morning and evening, 174; one who believed he was purified from sin when he had said this - , 205.preacher, men differently affected by a - , 122; those who do good from obedience have no knowledge of faith, love, God, except what they learn from a - , 210.preaching, 174.precede, the faith that -s charity, 198. 153
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEPRECEPT, man must see what=evil and falsity, from the -s of religion=Decalogue, 205; similar -s among all nations with whom there is religion, 206; evil must be removed first, evident from -s of Decalogue, 208; Paul says he who loves neighbour keeps -s of Decalogue, 210.presence, servants behaviour in - of masters, 172.present (verb), what the Internal man -s to sight and feeling in External, 181.preservation, 168.pretenders, 65.pretext to evade laws, 188.pride, 4; business man not filled with - in successes, 167.PRIEST (see minister), charity in the case of the - , 160; external things of worship in the case of -s, 174; -s who sell salvation, 195.priesthood, - and connected duties=ministries, 134.principal, - and instrumental of a business mans occupa­ tion, 167; - goods in anyones occupation, 185.principle that it is Christian not to do evil to neighbour, not enough without love, 210.prior, shunning evil - and interior to doing of good, 41.prison, going to those bound in - , 17.prisoners, how a soldier looks on - as the neighbour, 166.private, good of use towards - individuals, 158; - discus· sions, 189.privately, priests teaching - , 174.pri vations, 79.PROCEED, whatever -s from a mans form is a likeness of it, 114-121; three things that - , thought, speech and action, 114; worship in external man -ing from charity in the internal, and not so -ing, 177; such as affection, such are all things -ing, 185; the Lord must be in the Good, and be the Good, for it ---5 from Him, and what -s from anyone derives its essence from him, 201; the Divine -ing, 104.produce (see bring about, BRING FORTH), the Lord -s good from Himself, through man, 201; plants can - nothing but what agrees with own form, 202. profane, in case of wicked men, good turned into evil and -d, 208. professions, the various - , 134. promote, those who work to be praised and -d, 194. 154
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEPROPRIU)I, mans -=his will=nothing but evil, 2; a man in himself, and in his -=nothing but evil, 201; all things of - delightful, 2; the Lord does not dwell in the things of mans - , 104; perception from the - , 123; the origin of man being, in respect of his - , nothing but evil, 204; every man loves his - ; the voluntary -=evil, the intel­ lectual -=falsity of evil, 205; good after repentance puts away its - , 207.PROTECTION, of a kingdom, 85, 130, 133; soldiers responsible for - , 135; - ensures s!lfIicient wealth in a kingdom; 135; army commander only goes to war for ­ of his country, 164; an army ofIicer=the - of his country, 165; workmen of service in providing for - of a country, 168.provide, means -d by the Lord that man may not perish, 204PROVIDENCE, DIVINE, how a business man trusts in ­ attributes future to - , and ascribes his own prudence to - , 167; seafaring men trust in - more than others, 170; plays from which something of the - shines out, 189.Providence, Angelic Wisdom concerning the Divine, referred to, 197, 201.provinces, 161.prudence, cunning with him is not cunning, but - , 164; - of ·a business man attributed to Divine Providence, 167.prudent, 54, 195·prudently, ship.captains act - , 170.public, - good, 83, 167; - penalties, 195; - discussions, 189; those who are a - burden, 196.punish, a devil-man should be -ed, 48; laws kept from fear of being -ed, 188.punishment, those doing good from obedience and fear of - , 210.pure, - or impure delights, 191; - heat and light of sun, 202; - gold, 202; how can anything - inflow from heaven, if impure things not removed, 208.purification of internal man, 12.purify, the Lords endeavour to - man from evils, 203; two means by which man can be -ed from innate evils, 204; one who said, " I am -ed from sins when I have said this prayer," 205.purpose, from what - saying and doing spring, ll8.pursuits, 136; everyone in heaven delighted with his own -,13 8. 155
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEputrid, heat of sun turned into - and noisome smells, 202.puts away, good after repentance - itself and its proprium =evil, 207. QQUALITY, the - of charity, how recognized, 7; the - of the neighbour in accordance with good, So; man is the neigh­ bour according to the - of his good, 73; - of goods according to which a man is the neighbour, 77; the ­ of a kingdom shown in its form, 84; the - of charity, how discerned in heaven, 97; the will without the under. standing has not any - , 107; the - and order of a general dependent on the - and order of its parts, 132; prisoners =the neighbour, according to the - of their good, 166; everyone saved according to the - of good or charity in him, 185; - of love in diversions of those in affection for gain, 195; the - of anyones charity is such as the charity he himself is, V. p. 66.quickening, all - and fructification is from good by means of truth, II2. Rrainbow, more pleasing than light itself, 190.rank, governors highest in - of those serving others, 161; the glory army officers have from their - , 165; doing homage in accordance with the rules of - , 211.rapine, those in affection for gain full of - , 195.RATIONAL (see irrational), 43; - good according to which man lives with man as brother and companion, 57; a ­ moral man, 60; spiritual, ciil, and - good of a kingdom, 84; the affection of - or moral truth, 111; provided only he has something - , 202; -sight or understanding closed by false things, 202.rays, of the sun, 207.reading, - the Word and books of instruction and piety, 174; - books, as a diversion of the mind, 189.really, a kingdom such as it - is=one man, 84.reason, footnote p. 66; moral good in accordance with the state of perfection of a mans - , 60; a man of sound - , 20 3.recede, those who - from charity, 193.RECEIVE, the eye not light itself, but can - it, 102; the Lord cannot inflow with good, so that it is -d, unless evils are removed, for evils do not - good, they reject it, 202; 156
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE devils do not - influx of good, 202; how a tree -s !.teat and light from the sun, 202; mans mind, when infernal, does not - any good from the Lord, 202; how man -s power to resist and fight evils, 203; how man -s Divine influx, 206.RECEPTACLE, how man is a - of charity, 102.106; the Divine can inflow into, and be adjoined to, a -, 162; the ear is the - for hearing, 102; a form of charity, that is a ­ of it, 158.receptive, man is a - subject of charity, 103.recipient, a man is only a - of life, and of good, 201; man made a - of the Lords love and wisdom, but did not want to be a - , 204.reciprocal conjunction, 106.recognition, - of evil, 33; - involves knowing what is true and what is false, 39.RECOGNIZE, -ing sins, I, 3, 4, 205; all in same heavenly society - one another, 76; -ing evils, 179, 181; in so far as anyone does not - and know what sins are, he sees no otherwise than that he is without sin, 205 j a man could, if he wanted to, - and know his sins, 205; in so far as anyone -s and knows what sins are, he can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord, and repent, 206; quality of good before repentance not -d in the world, but manifestly after death, 207.recover, means of -ing the image of God, 204.recreate, enjoyments and pleasures for -ing the mind, (chap. XI) 189-196; diversions useful for -ing minds enumerated, 189; minds to be -d by diversions, 92.recreation, diversions that serve for -, 93.red, 90.redeem, belief that Christ -ed from hell, 203.reflecting, - upon ones thoughts and intentions, 175 j a mans - upon the evils in himself, 181. reform, 201; the Lords continual endeavours to _. and regenerate man, 203; those doing good from obedience are being -ed, this comes first; before regeneration, 210.reformation, 2.Reformed Christian, 86.REGENERATE, the life of a man who is to be -d, 102 j how, step by step, man becomes new, and is -d, 180; unless man believed good to be as from himself, he could not be reformed and -d, 201; the Lords continual endeavour to reform and - man, 203; those doing good from affection are being -d; after reformation, 210. M 157
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEregeneration, 2.region, a whole - , 133; lowest -s of heaven, 210.reject, a useless member of a commonwealth -ed, 128; when man -s power to resist evils, 203; if a man at heart -s the precepts of the Decalogue, 205.relation, a, 75.relationship, judgments on a basis of - , 20, 163; spiritual -s; also, natural -s, 76; - does not make the neigh­ bour, 85.relaxed, if the mind is not - , it becomes dulled, 190; minds to be - by diversions, 192.R~:LIGION, 8, 8<); - of an empire, kingdom, or republic, 87; he who is only in doctrine cannot have -, 89; the whole Church and all - founded on the idea of God as one, 201 ; what the whole of - is, 203; evils termed sins, because contrary to Word and - , 203; all - taught repentance, 203; the precepts of - refer to ten precepts of Decalogue, 205; similar precepts with all nations in universe with whom there is - , 206; where there is no good of life, ­ does not exist, (chap. XlI) 212-213; the Church and ­ make one, 212; the Church is a Church from its doctrine, and - is - from a life in accordance with doctrine, 212; it is said "the Church" on account of doctrine, and " - " on account of a life in accordance therewith, 213; with those who are in faith separate from charity, there is neither the Church nor - , 213.REMAIN, good, not felt as from himself, would not - in him, 201 ; in so far as anyone does not shun evils as sins, he -s in them, 204; if a man does not adopt means of purifica­ Ition he -s such as he was born, 204; to - in evils is to increase them, 204; if man were to remove outermost things of himself, lustings would still - , 206; if a man does not repent he -s in evils, 210.remitted, belief that sins have been - , 204.REMOVE, evils not -d by only shunning them, 204; the Lord -s lustings; if man of himself were to - outermost things, lustings would remain, 206; by repentance, evil is -d and good implanted, 207; evil, impure, and unclean things must be -d first, 208; evils must be -d first, before loving neighbour, 210.renewed, affection of use, resting, gradually - , 193.renovation, the Lord inflows and effects - in diversions, 193·RENOWN, uses for the sake of -, 185; laws kept from fear of losing -, 188; thinking about - and position, 194; those 158
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE not afraid of losing - that brings them the desired gain, 195.REPENT, man can - of sins if he will, 4; unless man -s, 18; when a man considers -ing, 179; how a man should - of evils, 203; in so far as anyone recognizes and knows what sins are, he can - of them, 206; a will and effort as of himself to give up doing sins and -> 206; necessary for a man to - , because he is born into evil, 208; if a man does not - , he remains in evils, 210; not doing evil to neighbour is fighting against evils in oneself and -ing of them, 210.REPENTANCE, 20, 33; looking to the Lord and shunning evils is done by - , I, 208; good before - , I, 6, 10, 207; charity before and after - , 10, 207; good before and after - , 207; the devil cast out by - , 10; - preached by the Lord, the disciples, John the Baptist, 26; before - good is not known, 26; before - a man is in evil, 207; - taught by the Lord, apostles, Paul, Word, and all religion, 203; by - evil is removed and good implanted, 207; crucifying the flesh done by - , 210.representatives, of a man in the spiritual world, 120.republic, empires, kingdoms and -s, 87; greater and greatest general good =that of kingdom or - , 162.repntation, 15; employments performed solely for the sake of - , 196.resist, when a man -s his evils, 179; when a man receives power to - evils, 203; power to - evils, when besought, never denied, 204.responsibility, everyone, in whatever position of - , is obliged to serve, 72.rest, when the mind longs for - , and -ing descends into the body, 9; affection of use, while -ing, gradually renewed, 193; no - of mind or peace for those who work for position, 94.retinne of servants, ,62.return, how man -s to state into which he was created, 204.reveal, it has pleased the Lord to - in His Word, 201.REVENGE, 15, 20, 88; acts of - , " 194; taking - because one is not honoured, 205.revive, minds to be -d by diversions, 192.REWARD, how good is -ed, 8; an angel.man should be -ed, 48; good done for - , 199; a desire for - , 207; good done for salvation is done for - , 209; those who think they merit - for benefactions, 210; meaning of, they shall have their - ; the affection of good itself is their - , 210. 159
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCErich, to grow, 196.riches (see wealth), how - given to an angel, 140.robber, parable of the man wounded by -s, 50; possible for ~s to love each other mutually, 88; a thief and a - , 160.Rome, if I had been born in Venice or - , 88.root, avarice=the - of evils, 167; - of a tree cfd. to ones own good, 167 j lustings that are the -s of eVil, 206.roses, a garland of, 190.rouse, how the Lord can - an evil man to do good, 202.ruin and destruction in warfare, 164.rule (verb), if the sensual is allowed to - , 204.rules, of rank, 211.ruling affection, 118. sSacrament, the - of the Supper, 174.sailors, ship-captains just in dealings with -, 170; charity in the case of - , 171.salt losing its saltness, 190.SALVATION, - of souls, in the case of the priest, 160 j talking with other people about - , 174; thinking and meditating about - , 175 j the lot after death of many who had thought about their own - , ,85; priests who sell - , 195; justifica­ tion and -, 203; good, if done for the sake of - , is done for reward, 209.SAVE, no one -d by benefactions of charity, but by charity in them, 185-186; everyone -d according to the quality of good or charity in him, 185; reformed and regenerated,_ and so, being -d, live tCJ eternity, 201; belief that faith -s without works, 203.savour, salt without - or stimulus, 90.SAY, -ing and doing, 118-119, 212 j what man -s within himself when repenting, 203; what one thinks and does not - believed to be not a sin, 205.schools, 78.scope, the - of ones office or employment, 149; the - of an officials jurisdiction, 162; benefactions = goods done out ­ side - of a mans occupation, 184.scorning, servants not - to serve, 72.SCUlptures, 43.sea, the Lord=God of heaven and earth and - , 170-171. 160
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEseafarers counselled to pray to the Lord, 170.seafaring men more devout than those on land, 170.seamanship=a good work, 171.second, the - heave!!, 94, 99; the" - " of charity, (chap. Il) 1341, 158, (chap. Il) 209-211,=to do good to neighbour, 210.sections, particular - of a community or state, 158; the ­ in their series, pp. 66-67.security, of a country from invasion and destruction, 165.SEE (see SIGHT), -ing sins, I, 3,4, 204; man does not - the hidden things of charity in himself, but the Lord does, 167; when a man -s his evils, 179; what everyone can ­ from merely general influx, 202; in so far as anyone does not recognize and know what sins are, he -s no otherwise than that he is without sin, 205; man has to - what=evil and falsity, from some other source than himself, i.e., from the precepts of religion, Decalogue, 205; in so far as anyone recognizes and knows what sins are,. he can ­ them in himself, confess, and repent, 206; in order that a man may - what sins are, the "first" of the Word was the Deealogue, 206.seed, 132; charity dd. to the growth of a tree from - , 115- 116.selecting, - persons for a domestic matter, 46; - a wife, 48 .SELF, uses done for the sake of - (themselves), 185; house­ hold expenses for one-, 187; what is as of your-? 203; despising anyone in comparison with one-, 205; the evil that is in a mans good regards only it-, 207; good after repentance puts away it- and its proprium, 207; fighting the evils in one--, 210.SELF, LOVE OF, man born into - , 2; - delights in things of proprium, 2; uses done from - , 194; - and arrogance= heads of all sins, 205.selfish, doing good from - and worldly considerations, 202.sell, officials who - the uses they do, 195; judges who ~ justice, priests who - salvation, 195; those in high office who may - their country, 195.sensation, -s of sight, hearing, etc., 191; understandings perception makes - , 191; how - communicates itself, like a force applied to the separate links of a chain, 191.sense (see good sense), five organs of - , 143; diversions for - of sight and hearing, 189; an interior - of gratification from the Lord in diversions, 193. 161
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEsenses, 102; the mind and its interior - , 102; diversions of charity=enjoyments and pleasures of bodily - , 189-196.sensitive nostril, 202.SENSUAL, corporeal and - men, 196; serpent signifies the -= ultimate of natural man, and its lust, 204; what happens when the - is allowed to rule, 204; the - exists in the world and admits objects therefrom, 204.sensuous pleasures, 194.series, every society a - of affections, 137; different parts of the human body in their own - and order, 143; the sections in their - , pp. 66-67.sermons, 174.serpent, signifies the sensual and its lust, 204.SERVANT, 202; a governor is a - directed by the Lord, 161; a retinue of -s, 162; children and -s, 164; charity in the case of -s, 172; -s can come into heaven, 172; instruction of children and -s, 174; expenses and outlays for men-s and maid-s, 187.SERV(E), governors highest in rank of those -ing others, 161 ; servants not scorning to - , 172; everyone obliged to - ; even a king ought to - the Lord, 172; how anyone - 5 freely and not under compulsion, 172; good after repen­ tance is some use to neighbour, hence it is -ing, 207.service, positions of - , 134; workmen do goods of use of ­ to the neighbour, 168; sailors in heaven render mutual -s, 17I.several, sight enlivened by - colours, 190.sex, several organs of generation in each - , 143.shade, truth in light, and in the - , 113; those who do good from obedience have light of understanding in - , 210.sheep, 195.sheepfold, lOO.sheltering the stranger, 17.shepherd, the priest as a good and bad - , lOO.shin(e), a lovely and beautifully-coloured flower -ing out brilliantly under the suns rays, 207.ships, ship-captains entrusted with - , or owning them, 170.ship-captains, 202; charity in the case of - , 170; their work a greater good of use than many others, 170.shoot, of a tree, I IS.SHUN, in heaven they - idleness, 138; a workman in charity -s idleness, dishonesty, fraud, luxury, intemperance, 168; evils not removed by only -ing them, 204; -ing evils should be first, 208; man not able to love neighbour and have faith before he -s evils, 210. 162
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCESHUN EVILS BECAUSE THEY ARE SINS, I, 7, 8, 17, 20, 40, 41, (chap. VII) 158-172, 173, 185, 199, 202-204, 208; to - is to do good, 32 a man ought to - as from himself, neverthe­ less from the Lord, 2°3; in so far as anyone does not - , he remains in them, 2°4; if a man does not - , but only shuns them as hurtful, 2°4; when man - he is also shunning them because they are against the Lord and contrary to Divine laws, 204.sick, visiting the - , 17.SIGHT, - of the eye, 123; affections (in external worship) that reach - and feeling, 175; - and feeling, 181; diver­ sions of charity for sense of - , 189; - goes if a single object or colour looked at continuously, 190; - enlivened by several colours, 190.SIGN(Sj, - of charity=all things of worship, (chap. VIII) 173-183; how external things of worship are - of charity, 176; whatever the Internal man brings about in External termed a - , 181; when the external is not a - of charity, 181 ; a - , definition of, as an indication and testification that a thIng exists, 182; no internal without its - and indication, 183.signif(y), a sign marks and -ies, 182; what is -ied by eating of tree of knowledge of good and evil, 204; Ten Words - all truths in the complex, 206.simple, what the - do, 52; the - kept apart from others in the other life, 53; diabolical spi ri ts acquire strength from the -,53.SIN(S), shun{ning) evils because they are - , I, 7,8, 17, 20, 4°-41, (chap. VII) 158-172, 173, 185, 199, 202-204, 208; see also under SHUN EVILS; recognizing - , and knowing what are - , I, 3, 7, 2°5; knowing what evils are - , 2°3; con­ fession of - , I, 7, 205; man does not see any - in himself, 3; a - for a judge not to put justice in the first place, 163; giving consideration to evils as - , 185; - to be enumerated which a man does from what is hereditary, footnote, p. 66; evils termed - on account of being con­ trary to the Word and religion, 2°3; in so far as anyone does not recognize and know what - are, he sees no other. wise tban that be is without - , 2°5; particular - , mans ignorance of them even when he declares that he is a sinner, 2°5; - so nurperous a man cannot tell them all, 2°5; in so far as anyone recognizes and knows what ­ are, he can see them in himself, confess them before the Lord, and repent of them, 206.sincere, a - man can be known from face and voice, 98; every - man is loved by some who are insincere, 122.sincerity, hypocrites able to put on the - of charity, 9S. 163
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEsinging, 1l0, 174, 193.single, if a - object or colour is looked at continuously, 190 ; body is a - form, 191.SINNER, man knows that he is a - from the Word, 3; people who declare they are -s, but are ignorant of their sins, 2 °5; those confessing they are -s, without having examined themselves, 210.sinning, acting against God, or -, 206.skill, 130, 135.skin, 3.slandering, 15, 20, 205, 208.slanders, 194.slaughter, army commander does not exult in - of enemy, 164.sleep (verb), 137.slothful, 194.sluggards, 196.small, a society, - or large, 78,,215smell, 191; heat of sun turned into putrid and noisome , 202; - of dung = good wi th hypocrites, 202; a house with an offensive - , 208.snow, if - is looked at continuously, 190.sober, workmen, 168; farmers, 169; ship-captains, 170.social intercourse (see intercourse).SOCIET(Y), a -. is the neighbour, 72; all in the same heavenly - recognize one another, 76; a - , small or lar ge, is the neighbour according to the good of its use, 78; every ­ (in a kingdom)=a man in composite form, 79; a - having one function =one composite man, 80; every - in heaven =one man, 81; an eminent - as one man, 81; so, too, a - on earth=one man, before angels, 82; the general good of a - or kingdom, 130; a community and its - , 133; the commonwealth or - consists of four goods of use, 134; heavenly - described, 137-138; every - is a series of affections in the order of the heavens, 137; how an earthly .- corresponds to a heavenly -, 39 innumerable occupa· tions in a heavenly -, 142; who comes into a heavenly - , 14; a heavenly - like a man in respect of its uses, 147; every - in heaven is a man, 148; governors in -ies, 161; everyone led to the - where his affection is, 185; in a natural sense, the neighbour to be loved =a - , small or large, 215. 164
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEsoldier, -s responsible for protection (of society), 135; how an officer loves the -s under him, 165; charity in the case of the common - , 166.sole of foot, 205.Son, the, 102, 201; false belief in Christ, - of God, 203.SOUL, when mans life and -=love of use, 152; the priest affected by salvation of -s, 160; the priest to lead -s to heaven by means of truths, 160; charity is the life, - , and essence of faith, 198; the Lord and the Father=one, like - and body, 201.sound (noun), - and speech·, 69; ear created into a form receptive of - by means of - and its inflowing harmonies, 103.sClund (adj.), man believes himself to be ,24.soundness, no - from head to sole of foot, 205.source, man has to see what=evil and falsity, from some other - than himself, 205.space and time, 42.speak, 105; judges think, - , and act from what is just, 163; servants not -ing ill of their masters, 172.SPEECH, sound and - , 69; manners, - , etc. = rational good of a kingdom, 84; - is the voices form, 109; thought, - , and action, 114; deeds, - , and thoughts of a man who is a charity, II6; how evil in a mans good is recegnized after death from the tone of his ,...-, 207.splendours, 189.Spirit (Holy), the Lord and the - are the same, like Divine in Him, and Divine from Him, 201; Trinity of Father. Son, and Holy - in His Person, 201.SPIRIT, 37; action itself in - =effort or will, 4; diabolical -s, 53; the form of charity of a - or angel described, 97; a mans mind is a - in the human form, 98; army officer contented in - , 165; when farmers become -s, in a form of charity, 16g; Internal man said to be the , 178; - and flesh at war, 178; -s from hell, called the devil, admitted to the External man", 180; charity in the Internal man or the - , 183; those whose -s are unclean, 196; self-examination in the world of -s, 205; Paul says flesh is against the - ; the - cannot love the neighbour unless he crucifies the flesh, 210. SPIRITUAL, 43; civil, moral, and - laws, 59; - relationship and kinship, 76; - quickening and fructification, 112; heat and light of the - , I IS; - conjunction, 124; the innumerable occupations of heaven all - , 142; - and natural delights, 191; - pleasantness and - delight in 165
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CGNCORDANCE diversion, 193; not a grain of - faith apart from charity, 198; - sins, footnote p. 66; love forms a man in respect of his - part, 202; how the form of a mans mind in respect of - things, becomes infernal, 202; something natural in which there is nothing - , 209; how a man becomes - and a new creature, 210; those who do good from obedience are natural, while those who do good from affection are - , 210.SPIRITUAL GOOD, civil, moral, and - good, 23, 55, 83, 214; - is the good of charity, 56; in accordance with his ­ a man is an angel of heaven, 60; charity regards -s in the first place, n; -, civil, and rational good, of a kingdom, 84; ought my country to be loved for its -? 86; a good of charity, in its essence a - , 201; neighbour to be loved in accordance with his - , 214; a man is a man by reason of his - , and not by reason of his moral, civil, and natural good separate from - , 214; these three goods derive their life solely from - , 214; - is the good of charity, thus the Lord, heaven, and the Church with man, 214.SPIRITU,IL IDEA, the neighbour to be loved is, in a - , good and truth, 42, 45; is good, 7[; in a - good is the neighbour, 73, [24; in a - , an army officer is the protec. tion of his country, 165.SPIRITUAL LOV~;, a - or affection, 8; - but not celestial love, 95; the life of - , [96; evil stands in the way of a man loving the neighbour from that - , 210.SPIR[TUAL MAN, 42; - who wishes well and does not under. stand well, 60. SP[RITUAL MIND, closed, and as if stuffed up with glue, in those who recede from charity, [93. SPIRITUAL SENSE, what is just, with judges, in a -=the neighbour, 163; good, in a -=the neighbour to be loved, 214.-SPIRITUAL TRUTH, the affection of - , [[ [; those who do good from obedience do not see any -s in light, 210.SPIRITUAL WORLD, affections in the - , [20, 185; in the ­ the idea of man as God stinks, 20[ ; love, in the - , appears from afar as a flame, 2 [I.-spurious, - charity, [; - good, [, 209.stagnant, urine, 202.-stagnate, [83.stagnation, 183.standard.bearer, worship from charity dd. to a - holding a banner, In. 166
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEstars, the heat and light by night from moon and - , 210.STATE (=condition), the - of the Church with men at this day, 94; interior - of mind in body, 191; the - into which man was created, 204; how man continues in a perverted - , 204.STATE (=community or country), affairs relating to the structure of a - , 78; laws relating to the structure of a - , 83; how a man is in the good of use towards a com- munity or - and sections thereof, 158.steal, 15, 171, 195, 210.stealing, 88_step by step, how, - , man becomes new and is regenerated, 180.stimulus, salt without savour or - , 190.stink, workhouses in hells - , 196; idea of man as God -s like a corpse, 201-stranger, 75; sheltering the - , 17.strength, diabolical spirits acquire - from the simple, 53.strengthen, how man -s the origin of evil, 204_stretch, minds kept on the - to be relaxed, 192-strong, 53.stuffed up, spiritual mind as if - with glue, 193.SUBJECT (noun), good and truth only in their -s, 45; a man is the - of good, 73; man is the - of charity, (chap. V) 90-u5; man is a receptive - of charity, 103; no - through which the Lord produces good from Himself other than man, 201-subject (adj.), governors - to laws, 161-subjects (of a kingdom), governors affected by the good of - or citizens, 161; taxes imposed on - and citizens, 187.subordination, civil obligation of - , 187.SUbsist, goods of use - from the general good, r27.substitutes, those who look for - to do their work, 196.successes, of a business man, 167.SUN, how heat and light of - inflow, 202; a coloured flower, shining out brilliantly under the --s rays, 207; the heat and light by day from the - , 210.supervision, of governors over officials, 161-supper, the Sacrament of the S-, 174; saying prayers at dinners and -s, 174.supplication, 203.supreme, the king is in the - pOSItIOn, 83.surface, good so far as the - goes, 202. 167
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEsurrounding things, the Lord does not inflow into mans evil, but into the - , 202.sustenance, employments performed solely for the sake of -,19 6.sweet, - poisons that kill, 2; something - in diversions= spiritual delight, 193.swine, 195; a house only fit for - , 208.sword, SI. Ttalk, 137; -ing with people about charity and faith, God, etc., 174; - about ungodly, obscene, and filthy things, 175.tasks, - of servants defined, 172; - of those in workhouses in hells, 196.taste, 191, 208.taxes, obligations of charity=payment of - , etc., 187.teach, taught, as the Lord Himself ~es, 102; priests -ing privately, 174; the Lord -es that He and the Father, and He and the Spirit, are one, 201; repentance - by the Lord, apostles, Word, Paul, and all religion, 203; the Lord ­ both to do and to believe, 203; the truths of faith from the Word - what is to be believed and done so that lot may be eternal life, 2 I 3.teaching (see DOCTRINE), the Churchs - that man is a sinner, 205.TEN, three or - persons, 46; - persons, 47; - maidens, 49 ; - brothers, 76; scarcely - men out of hundreds, who loved their country, 122; - precepts of Decalogue, 205; the ~ Words signify all truths in the complex, 206.testif(y), a sign indicates and -ies, 182.testification, a sign=an indication and - , 182. thanks, farmers who give - to the Lord, 169; - of ship. captains to the Lord, 170. thefts, 4. thief, a - and a robber, 160.THINK (see THOUGHT), -ing and willing, 4, 105, 119; judges - , speak, and act from what is just, 163; how a business man -s of the morrow, 167; -ing and meditating about God, heaven, etc., 175; -ing about renown and position, 194; -ing of how to find companions to gossip, etc., 196; to - man is God irrational and abominable, 201 ; what one -s and does not say believed to be not a sin, 205; abstain· ing from -ing and willing sins, 205. 168
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEthird, the - heaven, which is from the first men, 94.thirsty, giving drink to the - , 17.THOUGHT (see THINK), - , speech, and action, 114; deeds, speech, and -s of a man who is a charity, 117; percep· tion and - ; general - , and lower - , 123; the - of the Lord above a soldiers bravery, 166; affection, love, and - of workmen about their work, 168; external things of worship of mind =those done in will and - , 173; reflecting upon ones -s and intentions, i75.thousand, deceived a - times, 51.threats, 79.three, - or ten persons, 46; - things that proceed, thought, speech, and action, 114; these - goods, moral, civil, and natural, derived from spiritual, 214.thrifty farmers, 169.tiger, 195. time, space and - , 42; in process of - , since the first creation, 93; how a man is in the good of use all the 158. tissue of fibres of body, 191. tone, of a mans speech after death, a means of recognizing what evil is in his good, 207. touch, 191. TREE, 132; man has eaten of the - of knowledge, 93; signi. fication of - of knowledge of good and evil, 204; charity cfd. to the growth of a - from seed, 115-116; a good - , and an evil - , and their fruits, 118; -s in the spiritual world, 120; the general good and a business mans good cfd. to a - and its hidden root, 167; delightful views of -s, 189; a bad - and a good - , and the influx of heat and light, 202. TRINITY, the Divine - in the Lords Person, 201; the unity of the - , and the - of the unity in the Lord alone, 201. TRUTH, the Lord is the Way, the .:.., and the Life, 102; every - of faith is from the Lord, 105; how man cannot be enlightened in -s, 105; genuine -s to be learned, 108; - , rational or moral, and - , civil or natural, I l l ; - in the light, and - in the shade, by whom loved, 113; what the - of faith is at the present day, 113; falsity may be called - , 113; genuine -s look to life with the neighbour, 150; -s affect the priest who is in charity, 160; the priest is to lead souls to heaven by -s, 160; the priest to teach -s from the Word, thus from the Lord, 160; devils turn - into falsity, 202; heavenly light, which is Divin~ - , 202; Ten Words signify all -s in the complex, 206; affec­ tion of love is like a flame from which there is light in 169
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE -s, 21 I; possible to understand -s, and thence give utterance to them, and yet not from willing do them, 212; the Churchs doctrine ought to be composed of -s, 212; all the -s of faith of the Church are from the Word; what they teach, 213.truth and good, the neighbour, in a spiritual idea, is good and - , 42; - is the neighbour so far as it makes one with good, 67; - is good in form, 70, log; the affection of ­ from good is charity, 99; he who is not a form of the affection of - from good is a form of the affection of falsity from evil, 100; the affection of - from good, or charity, IQ2, I IQ; a man is a form of charity of such quality as, with him, good of the will is conjoined to -s of the understanding, IQ7- I 13; a - in its essence is a good, 109; good works from the will of good through the understanding of -,115; charity=affection of - from good, 149; the means to goods, which are -s, 168; goods of love and -s of wisdom, in themselves Divine, from the Lord and not from man himself, 204; good after repen­ tance formed out of -s; the form itself consists of -s, while itslife is the good of love; for the good sets -s into a form suited to itself, and makes everyone of its -s living, 207; those who do good from obedience do not see any spiritual -s in light, 2IQ; flames=affections of good and - so appearing, 211; the Church and religion make one like - and good, 212.truthful, every - man is loved by some who are liars, 122.trust, a business man -s in Divine Providence, 167; sea­ faring mens - in Divine Providence, 170.TURN, influx of good, and of heat and light, how -ed into opposites, 202; the Lord can - evil into good, 202; how man -ed away affections and thoughts from the Lord to self; and how he -s back again, 204; good -ed into evil if influx takes place before evil is removed, 208.twig (of a tree), 116.two (see SECOND), - masters, 156; - means by which man can be purified from evils, 204.two-fold, degrees of charity of a - kind, 1,01. uulcer, the - is opened and healed, 25.ultimate, sensual=- of natural man, 204.unclean, those whose spirits are - , 196; - cup and dish to illustrate that pure influx only possible when - things first removed in man, 208. 170
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE undelightful, infernal delight full of - things, 94. liNDERSTAND, man who wishes well but does not - well, 60; man who -s well and does not wish well, 60; possible to - well, and all the while not will well; to - truths and give utterance to them, and yet not from willing them do them, 212; when he wills as he -s then the will and the understanding make one, 212. liNDERSTANDING, II3; - is the receptacle of truth, 44; he is the neighbour according to the - , 60; - makes the neighbour so far as it is of the will, 6,; an internal and an external - , 62; - , regarded in itself, is such as the will is, 68; then truth makes - or intelligence, 95; - is in the light of heaven, 107; - brings about perception of delights of wills affections, 91; pleasantness said of wis­ dom and -s perception therefrom, 193; rational sight or - closed by false thing~, 202; light of - in shade with those who do good from obedience, 210; the Church and religion make one like - and will, 212. (see also WILL and -.) unfriendly, an - country, 86. ungodly talk, 175. unity, the - of the trinity and trinity of the - in the Lord alone, 201. • universe, I can love all in the - according to their religion, 89; all nations in the - with whom there is religion, 206. unjust, - plunderings; - bloodshed, 166.. unwearied, farmers in charity - at work, 169. upright, what is moral and - in an earthly society, 139. uprightness, 130, 135. urine, 202. {iSE (see GOOD of use), doing goods beA-use they are -s, 13; pious -s, 17; according to the good of its - , 78; every society in a kingdom established in accordance with -s, 78; -s eminent, lowly, and evil, as the neighbour, 79; one should have regard to the -s of ones country, 85; all goods of charity are -s, and all -s are goods=goods of - , also called fruits of - , 27; every man born to per­ form -s, and does perform -s to others, ,28; he who performs -s to himself alone is useless, 128; place in heaven in accordance with - , 37; the love of - in heaven, 38; all things in human body formed from, in, and for - , 145; the heavenly form of - like a man, 147; charity =affection of truth from good = affection of - , 149; an act from the affection of truth from good=a - , 149; when a man is a -, or a good of - , he is also a charity, IS; when a man is, in general, breathing forth 171
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCE - , he is doing so in every particular; his life and soul =a love of - , 52; why constant -s are to be done, 156; laws of - enac.ted by governors, 161; an official affected by - , and not honour except for the sake of - , 162; the glory of an army officers - , 165; contributions to pious -s, 185 j -s for the sake of renown, etc. (self), or for the sake of neighbour, 185; taxes for various necessities and -s in the commonwealth, 187; various household necessities and -s, 187; -s looked forward to in obliga­ tions, 187 j the affection of - inwardly in recreations, 93; those who work only from an affection for position do -s in abundance, not from love of - , 94; -s of thos·e in affection for gain, how enjoyed, 95; those with whom diversions are the only -s, 196; every grateful odour from the life of the love of - , 196; -s to be done to neighbour, footnote, p. 67; good after repentance = nothing else but some - to the neighbour, 207.USEFUL, - functions of officials, 162; enjoyments and pleasures - for recreating minds, (chap. XI) 189-196; those in hells workhouses driven to do something - , 196; good and - plants, 202.useless, a - member of a community rejected, or driven to some. work, 128; no one is - in heavenly societies, 37.utilities, various necessities and - , 168.utterance, possible to understand truths, and thence give - to them, and yet not from willing do them, 212. vvaingloriousness, 207.vanities, a workman in charity kept from thinking and loving - , 168.VARIET(Y), the -ies of charity as many as the -ies of the affection of truth from good, 99; how every - of charity originates from truths, log; unlimited - of deeds, speech, and thoughts of a man, 117; many -ies in general, 133.VARIOUS, - uses and societies in a kingdom enumerated, 78; - necessities and utilities provided by workmen, 168; taxes for - necessities and ilses in the commonwealth, 187; diversions of charity=- enjoyments and pleasures, (chap. XI) 189-196; plays of - kinds, .89; - kinds of manual work, 189; diversions are - in accordance with interior affection, 92, - acts of worship, 205.Venice, if I had been born in - or Rome, 86.vessels of body, capillary and general, 9­victims, soldiers as - in the glory of an officers use, 165. 172
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEvictory, ,64; a soldiers attitude to prisoners after -. 166.views, delightful - on walks, ,89.vinedressers, 169.vineyards, 16g.violate, women, 5.virgins, defio-ering - , 5.virtues, - of charity enumerated, footnote p. 33; plays pre· senting moral -, ,89.visiting the sick, 17.viscera, 43-44, 91.VOICE, prayer and confession with a ringing - , 3; charity discerned from the face and - of an angel, 97 how far charity can be discerned from a mans face and - . 98; speech is the -s form, 09; two forms of the - , speech and singing, 10.voluntary, spiritual mind, in respect of the -, as if stuffed up with glue, in those who recede from charity, 193; the - proprium, 205.voyage, 70. wwalk about, 137.walks, ,89.walls, of a house, 29.war, attitude of army commander to - and peace, ,64; spirit and fiesh at -, 78; internal man at - with external, 79.watchful, ship-captains, 70­water, stagnant -, 3; a fountain of J;>ure - , ,83; fiow through, like - through a water-skin all full of holes, 201.water-skin, 201.Way, the Lord is the - , the Truth, and the Life, 02_WEALTH (see riches), - of a kingdom, 85, 33; sufficient necessary in a kingdom or society, 30; - ensured by protection, by means of soldiers, 35.wealthy, delight of being -, 195.-elfare, 85.wheat, 95.white, 90.whole, - globe and its parts, 70; how the - body draws its own delights, felt as a - , 9; the - Church founded on idea of God as one, 20 ; the - of religion, 203. N 173
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEwholly, when man is - impure and unclean, 208.whom, to - one should do good, 99.whoredom(s), 4, 15, 20, 194. 208, 210.whoring, 88.WICKED, the Lord moves - to do good to others, 8; a ­ man who has not charity, 11; a - man as the neighbour, 79; possible for - people to love each other, 88; in the case of a - man, good turned into evil and profaned, 208.wide and narrow functions of governors and officials, 162.widows, assisting - and orphans, 17.wife, the chaste man loves his - , 122; adultery with some­ one elses - , 171; whoredom with someone elses - , 208­ 210; expenses and outlays for ones - , 187.WILL (noun), mans -=his proprium=nothing but evil, 2; evil in the interior - , 21; man has a two-fold - , interior and exterior, 22; the interior - purified by repentance, 22; the - to see sins and repent of them, 4; putting away evil is of the - , 39; the - is the receptacle of good, 44; spurious charity is of the - only, 54; the - makes the neighbour, and the understanding so far as it is of the - , 61; the internal - and the external - , 62-66; every good is of the - , 64; everything of the - is called a good, 107; the - is in the heat of heaven, 107; how the good of the - becomes the good of charity, 108; external things of worship of mind=those done in - and thought, 73; the -s love with its affections inwardly in the bodys sensa­ tions, 9; delight is said of love, and the -s affection therefrom, 93; a - or effort as of himself, to give up doing sins and repent, 206; the Church and religion make one like understanding and - , 212; man is a man by reason of the good of his - , 214; when the good of a mans- is loved, the man himself is being - , 214.WILL (verb), -ing and doing, 4, 60, "9, 205; no one able to - good and evil at the same time, 20; man created 50 as to think and - as from himself, 105 j a mans life in everything he -s, 119; what one -s and does not do, believed to be not a sin, 205; abstain from thinking and -ing sins, 205; possible to understand well and not well, and to understand truths and not from -ing do them, 212.WILL AND UNDERSTANDING, 43, 44, 47, 61-62, 68, 107- 11 3, 1[5, 43, 9 , 193; - , how related, 107; - are general things of the mind, 144; - make one like religion and the Church, 212.willingly, what charity does honestly and - , 187.wilingness, honesty and - of charity in obligations, 187.i88. 174
    • GENERAL INDEX AND CONCORDANCEwine, gets taste of uncleanness if cup is not cleansed, 208WISDOM, God is Love itself and - itself, 91; a man is such as his - is, but the life of his - is love, 92; man has turned away to - , and eaten of - , 93; the second heaven is from the - called intelligence, 94; when man has become external his - is called faith, 94; pleasantness said of - , and understandings perception therefrom, 193; goods of love and truths of - , in themselves Divine, from the Lord and not from man himself, 204.wise, 54; governors enact laws together with those who are - and God-fearing, 161.WISH, man who -es well but does not understand well, 60; man who does not - well is not the neighbour, 60; an ambassador who -es well to my country and his own, 87; servants -ing well to their masters, 172; not -ing to do evil to neighbour is loving him, 210; -ing to do good to neighbour, is loving him, 209; in so far as a man does not - to do evil to neighbour, he wishes to do him good from charity, 209; he who keeps precepts of Decalogue does not - to kill, commit whoredom, steal, bear false witness, 210.witness, false, 15, 20, 171, 205, 210.wolf, 195.women, violate 15.wood, little bit of, 203.woods, 189.WORD, the - referred to, 3-4, 8, 12, 16, 27, 183, 201, 203. 210; the priest to teach truths from the -=from the Lord, 160; reading the - and books of instruction and piety, 174; what the - teaches from beginning to end, 2°3; the " first" of the -=Decalogue, the coml"lex of all things of the -=Ten -s, 206; all the truths of faith in the Church are from the - ; what they teach, 213.word, actions and -s as external things of worship of body, 173; deceiving anyone in - or deed, 205; the" ten -s," 206; all the -s of a mans speech derive their tone from the evil in his good, 207.WORK, a useless person driven to - , 128; necessaries for - in a kingdom, 130; necessaries (in a kingdom) are there by means of all kinds of - and commerce, 131; business men responsible for necessaries for all kinds of - , 135; he who does no - not tolerated in heaven, 137; everyone in heaven allotted a house corresponding to his - , 137; - in heaven done from love of use, 138; the necessaries for all kinds of - , how given to an angel, 140; man look- ing inwardly to the Lord and outwardly to his - , 153; 175
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