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RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY         UNITED:                         OR,AN ATTEMPT TO SHOW THAT PHlLOSOPIDCAL PRINCIPLES       ...
F -. ---<""~ , .. -h u ,/ /, /n "               c:;; ...--
THE GIFT OF OLIVER PRESCOTT HILLER       OF LONDON~HARVARD COLLEGELIBRARY~                          Cooglc
HARVARD CUL LEGE L1IlHlIl1                                   1~.lf.;- (PU.A~Ù« ~{.~           { cJ.~~.             GLASGOW...
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PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.THE first edition of the following little work waspublished at Boston, United States, in the...
iv                    PREFACE.strongly in this regard; yet, when, in particular, theperiod of its publication is considere...
PREFACE.                       vami consequent reception of divine wisdom; andthe female to be distinguished by the predom...
CONTENTS.MEMOIR OF MRS. PRESCOTT                                   9                       CHAPTER J.I~RODUCTORY          ...
-----------_. -----
MEMOIR OF MRS. PRESCOTI.   MRs. MARGARET HILLER PRESCOIT was a daughter   of Major Joseph Hiller, of Salem, Massachusetts....
10                     MEMOIR.passages of a communication from her youngestsister, written in answer to a 1etter of inquir...
MEMOIR.                      11  "When l was about a dozen years old, althoughin the same family and house, we kept up a r...
12                    MEMom.arriving at womanhood, a circumstance occurredwhich had the deepest influence on Mrs. Preseott...
HEMOm.                      13welcome to it," Baid the other, "I have ha.d enoughof it." Âccordingly, he took the book hom...
14                    llEMOIR.her bosom the pure Doctrine of Life, which inculcatesthe necessity of self-combat and self-c...
MEMOm.                              15she felt that the Comforter had now come, whichwould BUstain her through them aU.  I...
· 16                   MEMOIR. her tender nature: but she now found the great consolations which the pure and clear doctri...
HEMOIR.                     17 one to the heavenly hosto     At tm:es, indeed, tender reco11ections would come over her; a...
18                     HEMOIB.love and parental care of her Heavenly Father, which,originally strong, had been so greatly ...
f                          MEMOIR.                     19     ton, New York, and Philadelphia, and with many     of these ...
20                     KEKOIR.her relea.se came. On the 4th day of August, 1841,after a period of deep distress, both of m...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.                   CHAPT ER J.                     INTRODUCTORY.THEBE is a mode of reasonin...
22       RELIGION AND PHILOBOPHY UNITED.than the belief, that man possesses in himself alife distinct from that of his Mak...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.           23one, that "man is but an organ receptive of lifefrom the Lord." But let us inq...
24      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.     But as we have above observed that Revelation  cau alone infonn man of the tru...
RELIGION A.ID PHILOSOPHY UNITED.           25  seekers and powerful judges of truth have been  deterred from farther inqui...
26      RELIGION AND PHIWSOPHY uNITED.under the blessing of Heaven ever tending upwardin its progress, is, we conceive, ma...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            27 other species of intellectual phenomena. It is this heaven-derived power of ...
28      RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.importance of seelcing for this "pearl of great priee."That such a pearl bas really...
CHAPTER Il.  ENDEAVOURING TO PROVE THREE PROPOSITIONS.PROPOSITION FIRST.-That aU trne principles, spring-ing from one only...
30      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.who can doubt that the aggregate portion of know-ledge now enjoyed, very far surpas...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            31in our love of diffusing or imparting our mentalacquisitions.  ,There are, in...
32       RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY LNITED. Rition, by coalition, by every process which may he devised; and if, after this t...
RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.          33sentiments which ha<! led them in the paths ofpeace from their youth upward. On...
34      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY WUTED.new combinations of thought are continually pre-senting new results, is also, we pre...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.          35such a perception, is the subjeet of doubt and diffi-culty.    That the spirit ...
36       RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.imploring for themselves the gracious aid of aspirit of candour, humility, and fir...
RELIGION A,W PHILOSOPIIY UNITED.            37  proye that we shall exhibit a more substantial or  life-breathing fOrIll o...
CHAPT ER III.ON THE PHILOSOPHICAL PIUNCIPLES IN GENERAL,    UNFOLDED IN THE SYSTEM OF SWEDENBORG.          " Can man, by s...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            39destitute of understanding, or possess one so blindedor perverted, as to be w...
40      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.   That the specific nature of heat and light, fiowingfrom the suns body, and meeti...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.                      41loweBt extreme of external nature. In this descent,we perceive that...
42      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. three degrees of the spirit, or emanating sphere of God, existing in various recip...
CHAPTER IV. ON THE PRINCIPLE OF SPHERES, AS UNFOLDED IN      THE COMMUNICATIONS OF SWEDENBORG.So numerous are the evils ar...
44      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.has arisen entirely from supposing the spiritual sunto be the Supreme Being Himself...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            45 a Divine Ruman form 1 That the common sense of  man acknowledges this essent...
46      RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.ceived ta he in any other than a human form, weshould, doubtless, use the neuter an...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.              47 powerful, and interesting emblem or type, and, we think, a beautiful illus...
48      RELIGION AND PHLLOSOPHY UNITED.death. As the pervading influence of the naturalsuns light and heat extends even to...
CHAPTER V. ON THE PRINCIPLE OF DEGREES, AS COMMUNICATED        BY THE SAME FAITHFUL MESSENGER. WE are also informed, that ...
50       RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.and subjeets of both worlds, without it, appear sim-ple, as if there were nothing ...
RELIGION AND PHIWSOPHY UNITED.             51 continuous, because they continuously increase, and are understood by degree...
52      RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.that discrete degrees, or degrees of altitude, arederived one from another, in a se...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.              53tions of the thoughts and affections in the brain;with the atmospheres; wit...
54        REUGlON AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.object being professedly of a philosophical nature)are, in a measure, extraneous t...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.                     55to love and wisdom, love is thé end, wisdom theinstrumental cause, a...
CRAPTER VI.    ON THE PRINCIPLE OF CORRESPONDENCE, AS            DEVELOPED BY THE SAME.To explain clearly the principle of...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            57  man, prepared two receptacles for itself, which are  the will and the under...
58       RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNiTED. That the principles or beginnings of mans life are in the brains, is manifest,-l....
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            b9love and wisdom. These first principles, the willand the understanding, are f...
60      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.the face, and present therein a type of itself. Thisevery one knOWs. ls not the a.f...
RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.              61 out of the sight of man by this dogma received iuthe whole Christian world...
62      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.Divine Head to the feet or extreme of creation,the naturaI earths, said in Scriptur...
RELIGION A.ffi PHILOSOPHY UNITED.        63pondence of man with the Deity, little we believeis really understaod. We ackno...
64      RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.manifestly from the reverse of the proposition, viz.,that the negation of God const...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.           65in a spiritual body, which fully appears after it hasput off ita material cove...
66      RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.   To trace this beautiful and striking correspond-euce through the numerous and va...
RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.           67of the difficulty would vanish. Were it fartherunderstood that the word of div...
68       RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.and feeling; and as they advance in age, these ap-pearances, which we find various...
RELIGION .AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.            69 DUl.turity, is nothing less than the regeneration or new birth and life, wh...
Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856
Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856
Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856
Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856
Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856
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Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856

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It is incredible that this book should have been written in 1817, on the onset of the Swedenborg movement in America, even before the creation of the first Swedenborgian community (Boston 1821). Everythig was perceived and said on the onset... [Degree = 71 occurrences (for a total of 71 pages) ...]

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Transcript of "Margaret hiller-religion-and-philosophy-united-boston-1817-second-edition-oliver-prescott-hiller-london-1856"

  1. 1. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED: OR,AN ATTEMPT TO SHOW THAT PHlLOSOPIDCAL PRINCIPLES UE AT THE FOUNDATION OF THE NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH. ~ d(,~ MftS._ M. H. PRESCOTT. """" SE(.OND EDITION. WITH A MEMOIR OF THE AUTHOR, BY BER SON, REV. 0, PRESCOTT BILLER. " LONDON: WILLIAM WHITE, 36, BLOOMSBURY STREET. BOSTON: OTIS CLAPP, 3, BEACON STREET. 1856.
  2. 2. F -. ---<""~ , .. -h u ,/ /, /n " c:;; ...--
  3. 3. THE GIFT OF OLIVER PRESCOTT HILLER OF LONDON~HARVARD COLLEGELIBRARY~ Cooglc
  4. 4. HARVARD CUL LEGE L1IlHlIl1 1~.lf.;- (PU.A~Ù« ~{.~ { cJ.~~. GLASGOW: PRtNTED DY BEJ.L AND BAIN. L
  5. 5. . j j j j j j j ,·" j J
  6. 6. PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION.THE first edition of the following little work waspublished at Boston, United States, in the year1817, and has been long out ofprint. On arriving in this country, l was gratified at finding copies in the libraries of several English N ewchurchmen, one of whom was the late Mr. Noble. The name of the author was not, however, generall:r known, as it was not affixed ta the original edition. A pos- sessor of one of the copies, a Minister of the Church,on leaTning that the work wa.s by my mother,warmly urged me to re-publish it. The idea had pre-viously oeeurred ta myself, but wa.s mueh strength-ened by a recommendation from sueh a quarter.l felt, moreover, in a manner, eonstrained by asense of filial duty, ta undertake it; and l mayfrankly add, that, after a careful penlsal of thework in my Inature years, its intrinsie value seemedto me a sufficient reason for iu. re-publication. It.il Dot, perhaps, becoming in llo son ta speak too
  7. 7. iv PREFACE.strongly in this regard; yet, when, in particular, theperiod of its publication is considered, it will, 1think, be pronounced a work of more than ordinaryliterary merit. At that time, few, comparatively,of the collateral wOlks of the Church had beenpublished. Mr. N obles "Appeal" and other excellentworks had not yet appeared; and, in America, sofar as 1 am aware, nothing whatever of the kindhall been written. So that this little work standsamong the very beginnings of New Church litera-ture, and from that circumstance alone possesses acertain value, which will be enhanced with theprogress of time. It may be added, that the factof a work of this philosophical and abstract cha-racter being written by a lady, is a circumstance which tends also to invest it with more than a common interest. The attempt itself at the pro- duction of such a work, is ploof of a high degree of elevation of intellect and power of abstract thought; and ü the execution of the plan be not found com- mensurate with its conception, the writer has herself furnished the apology. N ear the close of the work, she has the following remark :-" In mankind, the particular receptacle for the light of divine truth is the understanding, and that for the heat of divine love is the will; 80, the male is formed to excel his panner in the department of the understanding,
  8. 8. PREFACE. vami consequent reception of divine wisdom; andthe female to be distinguished by the predominanceof the love of wisdom as existing in the male. Thus,if the writer has herein given but an obscure andvery imperfect sketch of the philosophical princi-pIes, which form the basis of a glorious system ofdivine truth,-it is, that its heavenly image basbean received in the warmth of the heart rather thanin the light of the understanding; and that, to befully illustrated, it must be transfused from the feminine heart into the masculine understanding, thence to be made manifest in the light of true wisd omo " In the present edition, a slight change has been made in the arrangement of the Chapters,-what were originally a "Preface" and an "Introduction" being taken into the body of the work, and headed Chapters 1. and II. With these exceptions, and an occasional verbal correction, the work remains as originally published. O. P. H. UL.UGOW, N~ 4, 18li6.
  9. 9. CONTENTS.MEMOIR OF MRS. PRESCOTT 9 CHAPTER J.I~RODUCTORY 21 CHAPTER II.ENDEAVOURING TO PROVE THREE PROPOSITIONS 29 CHAPTER III.ON THE PHILOSOPHICAL PRINCIPLES IN GENERAL, UNFOLDED IN THE SYSTEM OF SWEDENBORG 38 CHAPTER IV.ON THE PRINCIPLE OF SPHERES, AS UNFOLDED IN THE COMMUNICATIONS OF SWEDENBORG 43 CHAPTER V.ON THE PRINCIPLE OF DEGREES, AS COMMU1!lI- CATED BY THE SAME FAITHFUL MESSENGER 49 CDAPTER VI.ON THE PRINCIPLE OF CORBESPONDENCE, AS DEVELOPED BY THE SAME 56
  10. 10. -----------_. -----
  11. 11. MEMOIR OF MRS. PRESCOTI. MRs. MARGARET HILLER PRESCOIT was a daughter of Major Joseph Hiller, of Salem, Massachusetts. The fa.mily came originally from the town of Watford in Hertfordshire, England, whence an ancestor, Joseph Hiller, emigrated to America, in the year 1677, and settled Ilot Boston. The father of the subject of this sketch removed, early in life, to Salem, where he married Mu.rgaret Cleveland. Six children were born to them, five daughters and a son : -Margaret was the third child. 8he was born in July, 1775, in the State of Con- necticut, whither her mother had retired from the dangers of the Revolutionary War, then just com- mencing. From her earliest childhood, Mrs. Prescott was• remarkable for her feelings of piety and habits of devotion. She would go alone through storms to church on the Sabbath, rather than millS the services of public worship. She was equally regular and ea.rnest in her private devotions. The following B
  12. 12. 10 MEMOIR.passages of a communication from her youngestsister, written in answer to a 1etter of inquiry, statethis fact in artless yet glowing terms, mentioning atthe same time other particulars, which set forth ina striking manner Mrs. Prescotts early spiritua1-mindedness and moral e1evation of character : " You will remember," remarks the writer, "that1 was the youngest of the six children, and thatthere were two between your mother and myself, sothat of her young .life 1 really know nothing butthat she was ever pure-minded, warm-hearted, andpeculiarly and steadily religioUB,-as my motheroften expressed it, sanctified from her birth. 8hewas a strict disciplinarian over her own heart, andtenderly active and interested in training her littlesister Lucy [the writer] to the difficult and almosthopeless task of self-control and self-improvement.Rer habits of private devotion, so strict and celÙle-less, deeply impressed my young mind. 1 rememberweIl, that a little unfinished shapeless room, in theattic, was taken into her possession, rubbish removedinto one corner, and in the other she had fixed acushioned c11air covered with a blanket, and akneeling-stool before it. To this, in the coldestseason, she would daily resort j and, covered withthe blanket, she would enjoy an hour of sacreddevotion, reading and prayer.
  13. 13. MEMOIR. 11 "When l was about a dozen years old, althoughin the same family and house, we kept up a regularcorrespondence, for a long period. Her letters wouldhave made a volume :-she, scrutinizing, watching,commending or reproving my daily life, my wrongor right feeling, my victories or submission whenassailed by temptation, full of earnest exhortation andtenderest love :-1, drinking in instruction, stimu-lated to effort, or sorrowing over the delinquenciesand wanderings she so faithfully pointed out, andglowing with devout gratitude for any deservedpraise. To her latest days, ar- peculiar tendernessfor her pupi! continued to glow, and was often ex-pressed with earnest feeling." How does this artless picture of my mothers earlyhabits of devotion, bring to my mind what l haveoft,en myself witnessed when a child! When inhealth, she was the earliest riser of the family;and often, when l came down in the morning, wouldI find her, as l opened the parlour door, kneelingbefore the fue, with the large Bible on the chair infront of her. And when she saw me, she would calIIlle to her and bid me kneel down by her side.What mere teaching, what mere precepts, couldhave ever made upon my young heart Buch an im-pression, as did this example of devotion ! But l have anticipated. About the time of her
  14. 14. 12 MEMom.arriving at womanhood, a circumstance occurredwhich had the deepest influence on Mrs. Preseottswhole after-life: that circumstance waa her oomingto the knowledge of the Doctrines of the NewChurch. It happened in the following manner.:fIer father, Major Hiller, after serving in the Warof Independence, had been appointed by PresidentWashington to the office of Collector of customs forthe port of Salem, which office he eontinued to holdf(}r many years. He was a man of sterling upright-ness and integrity of character, and also veryreligiously disposed. But, though a member of theEpiscopal church, his mind had never been satisfiedin regard to points of doctrine, and particularly inreference to the Doctrine of the Trinity. Howthere could be three Persons and one God, he couldnever satisfactorily discern; and he longed for lightupon this point. The light was on its way for him. One Sabbath evening, calling in, as was his wont,to visit his pastor,-the minister exclaimed, as he opened the study door, "Ha! Major Hiller, l have a treat for you here. Here is a man who pretends to give a full description of the next world, heaven and hell. W ould you like to read the book~" My grandfather, surprised at the ministers exclama- tion, and struck with the title of the book produced, expressed a curiosity to read it. "0, you are quite
  15. 15. HEMOm. 13welcome to it," Baid the other, "I have ha.d enoughof it." Âccordingly, he took the book home, anxiousto Bee what the writer had to sayon so remarkablea subject. The work was Swedenborgs "Treatise on Heavenand Hell" He, in company with Mrs. Hiller, whowas a true partner to him, and who had suffereddoubts similar to his own, immediately commencedthe perusal of the volume. Before they ha.d read ithalf through, they were satisfied that it eontainedtruth and the truth. Major Hiller at once procuredfrom England more of Swedenborgs worka, andbecame an earnest receiver of the New ChurchDoctrines. This waa, it is believed, about the year1796 or 1797. Some of the younger members of the family nowcommenced reading; and Margaret, with one of hersiBters, a.rdently embraced the new truths. In hermind this heavenly seed found a congenial soil. Herearly habits of devotion and communion with herHeavenly Father ha.d fully prepared her spirit forthe reception of the New Church Doctrine of theLord, which, in the One Person of Jesus, brings theDivine Object of worship so near to the mind j whileher long continued course of self.examination andstrict self-watchfulness, and combat with her ownheart, had made it easy for ber to accept and take tu
  16. 16. 14 llEMOIR.her bosom the pure Doctrine of Life, which inculcatesthe necessity of self-combat and self-conquest, asthe great means of preparation for heaven. RerhabituaI study, too, of the Roly 8criptures, herlonging to understand their full meaning, her know-ledge of their difficulties, rendered most welcomeand delightful to her that opening of the internaIsense, which is able to remove aIl the obscurities ofthe letter, and to cause the whole W ord to shinewith a heavenly light. And finally, her habits ofpiOUB meditation and spiritual contemplation, herfrequent lookings upward and inward towards the heavenly world, her longings to know the nature of that state which the Good Creator ha<! provided for mans eternal home,-made her eager to understand and quick to perceive the rational beauty of those clear and full revelations concerning the spiritual world, which the Lord, at this His Second Coming, has vouchsafed to mankind. In this great treasuryof spiritual truths, a new life-study seemed openedto her; and she hastened, with aIl the ardor of anenthusiastic nature, to devote herself to the investi-gation. She saw that the Lord had thrown a newand bright light upon the path of her life,/and shewent forward rejoicing in its rays; and thfough meweIl knew that many needful crosses and,..,-rials yetawaited her, in the process of her regene:ation, yet , )
  17. 17. MEMOm. 15she felt that the Comforter had now come, whichwould BUstain her through them aU. It was a few years after this important eventin her life, that she became acquainted with Mr.S. Jackson Prescott, her future husband. Hewas the younger son of Dr. Oliver Prescott, aneminent ,physician of Groton, Massachusetts,-brother to Colonel William Prescott, the bravecommander of the American troops at the battleof Bunkers Hill." Mr. Prescott, after graduatingwith distinction at Harvard University, had pre-pared himself for the profession of the law; butbeing unable, through a defect in his hearing, topursue the practice, he turned his attention tomercantile pursuits, in which he became very suc-cessfuI. They were married in the year 1804, and settledin Boston. A new sphere of duties now openedupon Mrs. Prescott, aU of which she sought to dis-charge with her accustomed diligence, conscientious-ness, and reliance on Divine Providence. And, erelong, she had need of aU her religious trust tosustain her under trill,ls and adversities. The lossof a little daughter, the third child, sank deep into • A biographieal notice of Dr. Preseott, as also of Col. PreseaU,may be seen in the Enryclopœdia A mericunu. The distinguishedhistorian, William H. Preseott, is a grandson of the latter.
  18. 18. · 16 MEMOIR. her tender nature: but she now found the great consolations which the pure and clear doctrines of the New Dispensation particularly aHord on occasion of bereavements such as this. Learning from those Doctrines the great truth of the Lords perfeet good- ness and Fatherly tenderness,-that the one end which He had in creation was to form a heaven of human beings, whom He might bless with eternal happiness,-and that all, without exception, who die in infancy and childhood, are received into that heaven and become angels; being enabled, too, by means of the clear and full descriptions of the spiritual state given by the New Church Doctrines, to form a distinct idea of the heavenly home to which her child had been taken, she could lift up her thoughts to that higher world, that "better land,~ and behold her darling in the care of guardian angels, led by them through gardens of beauty, taught by them aH heavenly truth with more than a parents power or even than a parents love, and preparing thus to become herself an angel, a happy dweHer in the heavens. With these thoughts, she felt a consolation come to her heart, a balm to her bosom; she felt her mind altogether lifted above the thoughts of death and the grave, to life and eternity; and, in time, she was enabled to rejoice at 1 1 having been made the. honored instrument of adding 1 --- --.-_J
  19. 19. HEMOIR. 17 one to the heavenly hosto At tm:es, indeed, tender reco11ections would come over her; and, years after, me would repeat, with a mothers fond particular- ity, the sentences and exclamations which the little prattler had uttered in her last ijlness. But though with tenderness, yet it was without sadness or regret, that she reca11ed these circumstances. She could not~ wish her child back again to earth; she only was anxions so to live as to rejoin her, byand by, in the heavens. But trials of a different kind awaited her. For many years Mr. Prescott was greatly prospered in bis mercantile undertakings; and, having acquired a considerable property, was about making prepara- tions to retire from business to bis paternal estate. at Groton, to spend the remainder of his days in literary leisure,-when the embargo and second war with Great Britain came on, suddenly reduc- ing him, with hundreds of other prosperous mer- chants, 1A;> the verge of ruin. It required a11 Mrs. Prescotts fortitude and conjugal devotion, toBUpport her husband under these severe reverses.Born and brought up in afRuence, he felt the stroke,which swept his property entirely from him, as oneexceedingly hard to bear. At this trying time,:Mrs. Prescotts religious trust, her habit of depend-ence on Divine Providence, her faith in the perfect
  20. 20. 18 HEMOIB.love and parental care of her Heavenly Father, which,originally strong, had been so greatly deep- ened by the teachings of the New Church doctrines, were caUed fully into operation: and they were aU needed. Often has the writer heard her say, that but for the support afforded her by the New Church doctrines, in the bright and cheering views and heavenly consolations which they communicate, she should not have been able to endure the load whichat this time, and indeed long artel, pressed upon her. And it may be said that it was her gratitude for thissupport and comfort, and her ardent convictionof the blessings which a wider knowledge of thoseDoctrines would confer upon mankind, which in-duced her to undertake the composition of the littleTreatise contained in the following pages. For itwas in the very midst of these trials and troublesthat this work was written. It was published inthe year 1817. How far the writers ardent wisheshave been accomplished,-how many minds mayhave been led by its pemsal to the rich fountainsof truth, whence it had itself proceeded but as alittle stream,-is known only to the Omniscient One. No society of the New Church as yet existed inBoston, and but two in the whole country, those,namely, of Baltimore and Cincinnati. There were,however, a few receivers of the doctrines in Bos-
  21. 21. f MEMOIR. 19 ton, New York, and Philadelphia, and with many of these Mrs. Prescott had acquaintance or held correspondence. She also corresponded with the Rev. John Clowes, of Manchester, England. And her intelligence and zeal in the cause were generally known andjustly appreciated throughout the narrow bounds of what then constituted the visible New Church. In 1818, the" Boston Society of the New Jerusalem" was formed, consisting at first of only twelve members, of whom Mrs. Prescott was one. That Society has,since grown and flourished, till it is now the largest New Church Society existing, numbering .at the present time between four hundred and five hundred members. Mm Prescott, through her whole life, was a great BUfferer, both physically and mentally. She was subject to palpitation of the heart, which at times ca.used her great distress, and once or twice brought her to the verge of the grave. She endured, too,- as every true follower of the Lord must-deep inter- na.l temptation. Being of an exceedingly spiritual and interior charaeter, her temptations were of a corresponding depth and intensity. But she weIl knew that they were permitted for her purification and regeneration; and she meekly bowed her head to the stroke, striving to sayever, "Lord, not my will, but thine, be done." At length, the hour of
  22. 22. 20 KEKOIR.her relea.se came. On the 4th day of August, 1841,after a period of deep distress, both of mind andbody, she p&!8ed away from earth, in the 67th yearof her age. The battle. of life was fought, the victorywon j and we are sure that she is now inheritingthe promises made to those that overcome: "To himthat overcometh, will l give to eat of the tree of lifewhich is in the midst of the paradise of God j""He that overcometh shall inherit all things." Shehas entered upon those heavenly felicities which therevelations made to the New Church so clearly andcharmingly describe, and which she so delighted tacontemplate in prospect. She haB, doubtless, longere this, found that angelic society with which herspirit was connected even while here on earth j shehas entered into full and blessed companionshipwith the spirits of the jnst made perfect, her fel-low-angelsj she is enjoying that blessed light andwarmth that flow directly from the eternal Sun ofRighteousness, the Lord himself: a glorions ex-istence of love and bliss now spreads itself beforeher, and she has begun the joyons race that knowsno end.
  23. 23. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. CHAPT ER J. INTRODUCTORY.THEBE is a mode of reasoning, which has long, we believe, been more prevalent than any other in the scientific world, which is that of proceeding fromaffects to caUBel!. This mode of reasoning is, doubt-less, predicated on the very natura! ground, that amu1tiplicity of effects is always exhibited before us,the causes of which are tota1ly unknown; this worldbeing literally and truly, in itself, a world of effects.A consequence of this mode of reasoning has, natu-rally, been that of endeavouriug to clear the wayto causes, by striving to ascertain what they werenot; thus hopiBg, by many negatives, to discoverIIOmething positive. That tills is often, to say theleaet, a deceptive and illusory mode of reasoning, ispreved by the manY false hypotheses which have beenits inevitable result. It has, we presume, proceededfrom a radical error into which man is naturallyprone to fall, but which Revelation alone Clin in-form him is really an error. This is nothing le88
  24. 24. 22 RELIGION AND PHILOBOPHY UNITED.than the belief, that man possesses in himself alife distinct from that of his Maker, when he is, intruth, but an organ receptive of life from its onlytrue Source. Feeling a powerful conviction, fromthe sense of his real existence, that life lB his ownperfect property, he is led to think, also, that hispowers are truly his own, and thence that in him-self originates thought. From this belief it is easyfor him ta infer, that in himself also rests the powerof discovering the true causes of the numerouseffects displayed around him. But if ~an wouldtruly humble himself, and intellectually look up and refiect, that as there is, as there can be, but OneSource of Life-so would he surely see, that fromthat Source must issue the knowledge of aU true causes; and that they can be communicated to manhy Revelation alone, though varying, perhaps, in kind and degree. As from one ,cause, .however, numerous and varied effects continually proceed, man need not suppose, that because real causes are to be found in God alone, that there is nothing left for the exercise of his noble powers. Believing the fact, and looking ta the Author of his existence and continual subsistence, for the first link in every chain, he will flnd abundant and delightful exer- cise for those powers, in deducing various particu- lars from one general idea; and in tracing the cause in the successive effects down ta his own natural perceptions of the variously beautiful objects dis- played in the world and universe around him. The assertion may, perhaps, be deemed a bold
  25. 25. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 23one, that "man is but an organ receptive of lifefrom the Lord." But let us inquire, What is life 1How came it into our possession 1 And by whatmeans is it preserved 1 Ând the more minute, themore thoroûgh, the investigation of this subject,the more fully, we believe, will it appear, that it isindeed an error, to suppose that man possesses anything of life in himself, separately from, or indepen-dently of, his Maker. The mode of reasoning, how-ever, adopted on this occasion, must be from causesto effects, and not vice Vfffsa; we must, therefore,commence from some revealed truth, and he led bythat truth, through its regular consequences, to theresult, which observation and experience point out.By this process, perceiving the truth in its fulneSkland power, we shall no longer doubt the proprietyof reasoning thus, or the truth of the proposition,that "man has not life independently in himself."On this aH important axiom, rests, we believe, muchof true wisdom. But this is only one of the manyportentous truths, that are now presented to man-kind; and in the following pages, it is humblyhoped that this method of tracing the finger ofGod through some of the numerous wonders ofcreation, will evince itself as a true and happyDleans of bringing man to a more perfect acquaint-ance with the Âuthor and constant Supporter ofms existence, and of educing a more clear andcomplete system of his own nature, powers, andduties, than has ever before been presented to hiscomprehension.
  26. 26. 24 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. But as we have above observed that Revelation cau alone infonn man of the true cause and manner of his own existence, we shall probably he expected to sta.te wherein we find the information that "man is an organ, receptive of life from the Lord." W e hesitate not to say, and humbly hope we are prepared to meet the coasequences, that we find it in the "spiritual sense of the Sacred Scriptures," revealed to that faithful and meek servant of the Lord J eBUS Christ, Emanuel Swedenborg, who, by a regular and powerful train of reasoning, does truly and fully prove, that "God" is indeed "with us." Long have we desired to see these important worka translated from their purely spiritual into a more natural language; and thus accommodated to the more general understanding of mankind at the present day. But to the accomplishment of this, we believe, higWy useful and very beneficial work, there are opposed many very formidable obstacles. A popular cry, almost terrific in a rational age, of "enthusiast," "visionary," everywhere pre- cedes the volumes of Swedenborg. That he was granted supernatural information respecting astate of existence superior to the present life, is noisedabroad in tenns of ridicule by those, who may, per-haps, have felt little interest in an inquiry into thevery important object of this information. Findingthis astonishing daim really made by a philoso-phical author, at this enlightened period of theworld, when instruction from our Heavenly Fatheris considered so totally unnecessary, many sincere
  27. 27. RELIGION A.ID PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 25 seekers and powerful judges of truth have been deterred from farther inquiry, by the immediate and premature conclusion, that none but a deceiver or self-deceived man could think of making such a pretension. Some there are, however, who have gone a little farther. In a rational pursuit of theo- logical truth, they have ventured to dip into these volumes as they have occasionally fallen in their way. Such persons being disgusted by an apparent crudeness in the authors cOlnmunications (the neces- aitY of which is easily explained), a singularity in the style, or a seeming obscurity in the sense, have found this disgust, aided by a previous prejudice, quite sufficient to satisfy the slight interest excited; and they, too, have thrown them aside, as nothing worth. Thus, have these treasures been buried in the earth! Respecting the authors knowledge of the spiritual world, it were weIl, perhaps, to remem- ber, that there have been many periods during thecourse of time, when apparently "new things nuder the suu" were permitted to take place among llIen. The age of exterua1 miracles has doubtless pastaway j but in these works is exhibited a species ofinternaI or spiritual miracle, absolutely new andtruly astonishing. An extent of intellectual infor-matidn is spread before the attentive reader, farexoeeding any thing that science bas heretofore pre-sented, or the human mind was capable of conceivingwithout supernatura.l aidj the trnth of which in-formation is morally demonstrated in its wonderfuldisplay. The mind of man, generally speaking, c
  28. 28. 26 RELIGION AND PHIWSOPHY uNITED.under the blessing of Heaven ever tending upwardin its progress, is, we conceive, making continuaIadvances in knowledge; and every new acquisitionadds greatly to its capability of advancing. Therevelation, therefore, now made to man, is snch ashe never could have borne at any former period; andcontains such "things" as our blessed Saviour " hadto say" to the disciples, but which they, on ea.rth," could not bear." On a deliherate, patient, and thorough examina-tion of the communications made to the world bySwedenborg (the writing and publishing of whichin the original Latin, wholly and fully occupiedabout thirty years of the authors life), snch a grandspectacle of new, yet decidedly important principles,is presented to the human understanding, that itshould soom they need but to he thoroughly com-prehended to be cordially received, and with hum-ble yet awful admiration. How then, may he thevery natural query, can we account for the pheno- menon, that even simple, unlettered minds can enter into the depths and subtilty of those com-mandingly grand, yet exquisitely refined prilllciples, while the man of extensive erudition, the elegant classical scholar, the deep-read theologian, the acute philosopher, and the truly rational moralillt, find themselves repulsed at the very entrance of this Mansion of Glories 1 It is at this very fountain of reasons, and this only, that the above enigma can und a solution; and in this system we may find a full, a satisfactory elucidation of this, and every
  29. 29. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 27 other species of intellectual phenomena. It is this heaven-derived power of unfolding the heretofore inexplicable secrets of the creation j of developing the innumerable mysteries with which science at every step continually presents its votaries j of tmcing the blessed connection between the glorious Creator and every possible form and degree of hisworks, that stamps the signature of Divinity on this precious message! It is from this glorious light, which is now permitted to beam forth from the interior of the sacred W ord of God, that every realpart of its literaI sense is now rescued from the obscurity into which a large portion of its contents wss fast falling j and that it is once again preparing to become the delight, the glory, and on earth the Heavenly Sanctuary of man. That this is not the vision of a diseased ima- gination, but a substantial view of truth, time onlycan demonstrate. But it belongs to the cool calcu-!ator, and not to the warm philanthropist, to wait-for the slow progress of time to unfold the promise of new and transcendant joys to man! The living CUITent of Christian charity circulating in the heart, strongly impels its real possessor to impart to his fellow-creatures every good in possession, or even in anticipation. But should the attainment of a great good in prospect, depend in a considerable measure on the knowledge and efforts of the candidates for its reception, how would a belief of this condition stimulate the real believer to make known the" glad tidings of great joy," and urge on his brethren the
  30. 30. 28 RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.importance of seelcing for this "pearl of great priee."That such a pearl bas really been for nearly half acentury within the reach of thousa.nds of mankind,who have given no attention to it, it may appear,perhaps, like presumption to assert. But if amongthose thousands, can be found even one who willnow listen to the friendly information, and applythe test of his own observation and experience toascertain its truth, the writer of these pages willesteem such an effect a full compensation for thismental effort" and offer to the Fountain of all goodsincere gratitude for such a degree of success.
  31. 31. CHAPTER Il. ENDEAVOURING TO PROVE THREE PROPOSITIONS.PROPOSITION FIRST.-That aU trne principles, spring-ing from one only Eternal Source, must be found toharmonize with the observation and experience ofthe wisest among mankind in aU ages. It is equivocaUy acknowledged by every rationalmind, that trnth can have but one eternal source;yet that source, being also infinite, must emit innu-merable and ever varying, because diverging raysor principles, in which that source is traced andacknowledged through the beautiful harmony by ,which they coalesce with and illustrate each other;therefore, though ever varying, they a.re never op-posing, like light and darkness, black and white.Thus trnth appears to man in infinitely diversmedforms, exercising his powers in the investigation of its nature and its uses. We universaUy find that exercise produces strength: by use, therefore, the powers of man expand and increase, and become more and more largely recipient of those Divine rays which illumine bis souI. On. taking an enlarged view of the state of the human rÎlind, at the present period of the world,
  32. 32. 30 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.who can doubt that the aggregate portion of know-ledge now enjoyed, very far surpasses that whichhas ever been possessed by mankind in any formerperiod 1 Ever making new discoveries, new acqui-sitions, the old are rarely, we believe it may be saidare never, whoUy lost. Thus, though there havebeen periods when the clarkness of ignorance andsuperstition seemed to envelope the world; yet,these have been succeeded by others of so muchgreater light and information, as to unfold thehidden treasures of the darkest ages; and prove tothe refiecting mind, that the temporary night wasonly to prepare for a more effulgent clay. In thisview of the subject,· then, we think it evidentlyappears, that the world at large, like its inhabi-tants, each in particular, has its graduaJ progres-sions from infancy towards maturity; who shaHsay when the latter periud has arrived, and thatits motion must be retrograde 1 But it may be asked, in what consist these gra-duaI progressions of the world 1 We answer, inthe discovery and application of apparently newprinciples, or additional rays of truth. ls itqueried, how we ascertain that these principleshave not been known and lost 1 We answer, thatno principles of truth can be absolutely new in them-selves, being from an eternal and self-existent foun-tain; but that some of them may, even now, be new .to the mind of man, is, we think, moraJly proved,by the order and tenacity of that mind in seizingand retaining any degree of real knowledge; also,
  33. 33. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 31in our love of diffusing or imparting our mentalacquisitions. ,There are, in individuals, widely different and.even opposite motives for this desire; but the resuitis the same, that of increasing the aggregate ofhurnan knowledge. ls it farther inquired, how wedistinguish and ascertain the true from the faiseprinciples, many of which, we are informed, areabroad in the world 1 We answer, that true prin-ciples are fixed and substantial; the false are everchanging and illusory. The true will thus hefound to coincide and harmonize with those alreadyknown and acknowledged by the observation andexperience of the wisest among mankind; whilethe faIse· are examined and rejected at the sametribunal. PROPOSITION SECOND.-Whenever, therefore, theardent intellect of industrious man discovers prin-ciples apparently new, they may he fairly tried byan appeal to the enlightened understanding of hisfellow-men, and will deservedly stand or fall by thedecision consequent on such an appeal. If, then, aU true principles spring from onesource, we have only to inquire, when new prin-ciples present themselves, whether they bear thestamp of this Almighty Rand. And to determinethis important point, they must he submitted tothe critica.l ordeai of the collected wisdom of allpast ages. Mankind, then, are to sift, to anaIyze,and to explore such principles, to examine theirinmost nature and tendency; to try them by OPPO-
  34. 34. 32 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY LNITED. Rition, by coalition, by every process which may he devised; and if, after this thorough and elaborate investigation, no flaw or imperfection cau he dÏs- covered, they have surely weIl stood this Hery ordeal, and may be pronounced true. During this critical cross-examination, however, vast must he the variety of opinions entertained respecting these principles; for each individual who thinks at aIl, will think for himself, and form his own conclu- sions according to the degree of light he himself cnjoys. No two, therefore, will make up precisely the same judgment, for no two can view the B8:rne object, at the same moment, and through the Barne medium, from the same point. But the human mind is, we have reason to think, never stationary. Though often apparently at rest, it is never trulyso, but is gradually and often, imperceptibly chang-ing its views of the same object; and, at length, onexamining opinions supposed to have been firmlyfixed, we find ourselves under the necessitJ ofacknowledging a decided change. Should any dis-covery of new principles. then, purport importantadvantages to mankind, "though an host shouldencamp against them," if trne, there would hefound powerful advocates; the wisdom of the wisewould carefully examine, the simplicity of the sim-ple would readily receive, them. By the former,they would be discovered to harmonize with theknown and acknowledged axioms of the westamong mankind of aIl past ages; and by the latter,to agree with the substantial, though unexamined
  35. 35. RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED. 33sentiments which ha<! led them in the paths ofpeace from their youth upward. On the conttary,should such principles, however specious their ex-terior, be intrinsically false, the truly wise wouldnot be long deceived; they wo~ld not rest till thehidden mischiefs were discovered, the charm dis-solved, and the hypothetical principles dissipatedin air. PROPOSITION THIRD.-That there are apparentlynew principles unfolded by Emanuel Swedenborg,which are, at the present period of the world,offered to this ordeal. And that the appeal mayhe the more clear and direct to the enlightenedunderstanding of man, the philosophical principlesare, in this "attempt," in a measure separated fromthe religious doctrines contained in these works,and presented at one view; that the judgment ofthe ingenuous examiner may act with cool impar-tiality, and thus render the decision, whether intheir favour or otherwise, complete. It bas not been the happiness of every age of theworld, to reap the vast advantages which resultfrom the development of important principles. Sodense has been the mist of ignorance and corrup-tion, which haB widely extended over the inhabi-tants of the world at some periods of time, as torender the human mind, for a season, almost im-pervious to the rays of trnth. Yet, so vast innumber are the l><>ints of absolute knowledge nowin the possession oi man, that he bas varions meansof trying any theory that may be 8Uggested. That
  36. 36. 34 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY WUTED.new combinations of thought are continually pre-senting new results, is also, we presume, beyond a doubt. What, then, of the novel and wonderful may not be offered to our consideration, it is impos-sible to OSly. It is time, we may conclude, to resignthe puerile habit of circumscribing the range ofhuman intellect,--of limiting that, which in itsessence is illimitable, as partaking the nature ofits infinite source. Much real hu~ty, then, andpatient investigation are necessary to the success ofevery sincere inquirer after important truths. Theimpatient desire to arrive at conclusions before thepremises are thoroughly examined, weighed, andunderstood, is too natura! to the human mind; andis continually preventing deductions, which mighthe just, decisive, and therefore permanent. To"learn to wait," is one of the hardest lessons givento man; yet nothing can be done well which isdone impatiently. As the perception and acknow-ledgment, or the rejection or neglect of substantialprinciples of truth, is a most momentous concern inthe life of man, it surely behoves him to he cau-tiously on his guard, whenever his attention isturned to this portentous work. That the presentis a period of this nature, is known to thousands,in various parts of the world, who have bean blessedwith the ability and inclination to examine andthence perceive the solid foundation of those prin-ciples. But how to produce in others that mentalstate of calm, candid, humble, and patient inquiry,which is absolutely necessary, as preparatory to
  37. 37. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 35such a perception, is the subjeet of doubt and diffi-culty. That the spirit of the Supreme is the only effec-tuaI operator in this blessed work, we· weIl know.But that the Divine blessing must descend throughhuman, voluntary instruments, is no less certain;JI.Ild that himself may he thus honoured, is theardent though humble desire of every sincere reci-pient of Divine trnth. That there are apparently new and highly im- portant principles unfolded by Emanuel Swedenborg, can he known only to those who have thoroughly explored the invaluable treasures of spiritual truth whi.ch he has presented to the world. To those, thiB foot is beyond all doubt. But it would he of no use to any one to helieve this upon the assertion of others, as sueh persons would rest on human authority, whieh is no actual belief of the mind. This can he useful, indeed, so far as to dispose the minù to patient researeh; and proportionate to this, where no other impediment arises, will be the degree of success in obtaining a rational conviction of the understanding respeeting those prineiples. To mankind at large, however, they were, "by their author, conscientiously subrnitted. They are now paatling the ordeal of human investigation. Persons of all degrees of rnind, from the most simple and unlearned to the most highly cultivated and intelli- gent, are earnestly desired "to pause, to ponder," to sifi and to weigh them; only rememhering the deep solemnity of the work, anù the importance of
  38. 38. 36 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.imploring for themselves the gracious aid of aspirit of candour, humility, and firm rationality inthis interesting investigation. By the final decisionof mankind, which must be consonant with that ofthe Supreme, they must necessarily stand or faIlIf .they diffuse, indeed, the glorious rays of Divinetruth, "the gates of hell cannot prevail againstthem." The mind of man win be gradually pre-pared to receive and refiect them, by gratitude,obedience, and joy, wj.th ap their delightful train ofeffects. If they are the works of darkness, theywill soon be overthrown and destroyed for ever. One objeet is contemplated by the writer of thialittle work, which, if accomplished, will serve, itis hoped, as a preparatory step to many rationalminds in the investigation of these works. Thesystem, it is well known, is professedly a religiousone. Its object is to mise its votary to a highdegree of excellence in religious knowledge, con-duct, and worship. But religious exaltation. hasever, heretofore, been of so doubtful, and thereforedangerous a character! Its pretended foundations,-that wild superstition, which disgraces the pages ofecclesiastical history; that cruel fanaticism, whichhad well nigh given a death-blow to Christianity,-these, its foundations, have been so baseless, if wemay be aIlowed the expression, and it has reared asuperstructure, in the monastic life, so grotesqueand useless, so gloomy and deformed, that it basleft on the minds of aIl spectators disgust andabhorrence, or contempt. How, then, are we to
  39. 39. RELIGION A,W PHILOSOPIIY UNITED. 37 proye that we shall exhibit a more substantial or life-breathing fOrIll of holy symmetry1 How (to change the figure) shall we prove that ours is a "city not made with hands, whose Maker and Builder is God 1" We can do it only by showing and explaining in what manner "Gods footstool is the earth; that His holy City, the New J erusalem, hath its foundations here; that the solid principles uf pure and. genuine philosophy form the eternal basis on which it rests; and that those principles of philosophy will be more and more confirmed and consolidated in the Inind, the more minute and closer the investigation of every reasoning inquirer. In order ta this, then, we would once more observe, that the object of the present undertaking is tocollect and place in a prOIninent point of view, thepeculiar phiiosophical principles which really consti-tute this foundation of the New J erusalem Church;and to show, by the blessing of God, that they are,indeed, a full and sufficiently substantial foundation,on which the eternal hope of man may lest.
  40. 40. CHAPT ER III.ON THE PHILOSOPHICAL PIUNCIPLES IN GENERAL, UNFOLDED IN THE SYSTEM OF SWEDENBORG. " Can man, by searcbing, find out God ?"lT bas already been intimated in the introductorychapter, that right reasoning must proceed fromcauses ta effects; that causes, existing alone in theSupreme Being, must be made known ta man byrevelation. It being now thus made known, that theglory which for ever emanates from and surroundsthe Eternal Being, forms really and substantiallya Spiritual Sun, which warms and irradiates theintellectual creation,-we find, clearly deduced fromthis truth, the following rational result: that theheat f1.owing from this Sun is in its essence divinelove; and the light, divine wisdom. Thât fromthis spiritual light and heat, the natural or materialsun, with its light and heat, solely derives its powerand efficacy. That all worlds, or combinations of worlds insystems, derive their existence and subsistence fromone eternal and infinite source, is acknowledgedby every rational mind. For, surely, if there everexisted a real atheist, he must be either wholly
  41. 41. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 39destitute of understanding, or possess one so blindedor perverted, as to be wholly useless on this subject.That the sun of our system has, then, the samederivation and continuaI support, is beyond a doubt;but in what manner this wonderful work is accom-plished, is a problem, which has ever heen deemedheyond the power of the human intellect to solve,or the human understanding to conceive. And ifthey have gone one step farther than a mere know-ledge of the suns origin, and said, it is done by theword of Gods power, the same question "how~" re-curs, and brings the subject to the same issue. Rasthere not heen a period in the life of man (thatperiod when the Copernican system was first pre-sented to the world), when it was thought a diffi-cultY of perhaps equal magnitude to reconcile thesuns apparent motion and real rest ~ Yet it is nowas generally received and understood as any princi-pIe of common knowledge. That the sun was createda perfect type, an imitator, as it were, of its glori-OUS Author, and like the hand of a dial, constantlyguided by, and pointing out His movements, is, wel1umbly undertake to support, a truth which mayhe proved by the philosophicai principles, that are,by Emanuel Swedenborg, first presented to the com-prehension of man. We say philosophical princi-pIes, because upon these premises is raised a system,apparently new, which must necessarily stand or fall with them. Therefore, whether this he a true or false philosophy, is the point to he now decided by 0001 examination.
  42. 42. 40 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. That the specific nature of heat and light, fiowingfrom the suns body, and meeting our senses of feel-ing and sight, has never been fully comprehendedby man in his fallen state, will, we trust, he unequi-voca.lly acknowledge~ But as there are, at pre-sent, in the human mind, many obstacles to thereception of truth, it will not, perhaps, be so readilygranted that this natural heat and light 80lelyderive their nature, their specific power and effi-cacy, from spiritual heat and light, which areessential love and wisdom, fiowing continually fromthe Supreme Being: in other words, that from theSupreme Being constantly fiows, or emanates, aglorious sphere of light and heat, which, in theiressence, are divine love and wisdom, whence origi-nate the power and efficacy df the light and heatof the natural or material sun, thus created a type,and refiecting back, by perfect correspondence, theimage of its great Original Is not this, we wouldhumbly ask, a clear and satisfactory elucidation ofthe important, but hitherto mysterious and latelydisputed union of spirit and matter 1 "God is aSpirit," saith the W ord of truth. It is the natureof spirit, if we may so spaak, to diffuse itse1f. Thisdiffusion causes a sphere of glory around the Su-preme Being. The emanating sphere of this glori-ous spirit, then, forming and operating in andthrough the material suns of the various naturalsystems, produced, and constantly supports in ex-istence, the wonderful creation: thus descending,by degrees, from the Great First Cause, to the
  43. 43. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 41loweBt extreme of external nature. In this descent,we perceive that varioUB degrees of spirit find theirabode in varioUB forInS of matter. This conception of a sphere, together with thatof spiritual degrees, form two of the new and im-portant prïnciples, which are, in this age, first pre-sented to the test of human wisdom. Let us hope,then, that they will he brought to an open, candid,and thorough examination; that they may he duly appreciated, and take their final station, accordingly,in the circle of knowledge. Who will doubt, that in the natural sun, which proximately produces and supports in existence all the wonders of this our natural worlp, there is a goodly portion of this living tire, this self-existent Spirit, this divine union of wisdom and love 1- Yet who but will acknowledge a vastly greater de- gree of this same all-pervading spirit in the rational soul of man 1 Herein the principle, also, of spiritual degrees, is acknowledged; and its beautiful effects caTI only he known by tracing the Barne principle "through nature up to natures God;" which is strikingly done by His own glorious hand, in th!, development He bas made of Himself to man, in the works of His servant, Emanuel Swedenborg. St. Pauls three heavens are there discovered to blj • That the writer cannot here mean, as might at fil!lt aight.ppear, that there is !ife in the natural sun itself, is plain from..bat is afterwarda saiù (p. 47), that the sun is but dead matter.The meaning intended is, doubtleaa, that the material sun is thetirat effcd of !ifc from the self· existent Spirit.-EDITOB. D
  44. 44. 42 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. three degrees of the spirit, or emanating sphere of God, existing in various recipient forms, which, thusreceiving, transmit their reflected beams of intelli- gence, in ardent emotions of gratitûde and love. The same glorious spirit, descending in smaller degrees, forms the souI of man, and the externa1 perfections of nature in her three kingdOIns, ani- mal, vegetable, and mineraI; giving to each itB peculiar degree of life, in proportion to their capa- city of receiving that eInanating spirit of the GreatAuthor of all things. There is one more important principle, whichis so linked or interwoven with the two above-mentioned, that we find ourselves under the neces- "ity of touching on that also, before we.. attempt to explain more fully or to illustrate either. This isthe principle of correspondence, which, in its devel-opment, forms a most striking and positive moralproof, that the whole creation, as it springs from itsfountain, the Deity, is a legitimate effect from itBglorious cause, in contradistinction from a merearbitrary work produced by an Almighty hand.We shall find, we humbly trust, in the explanationand illustration of these three grand principles,much substantial instruction and much deep wis-dom. May we be blessed in the endeavour ofdeveloping them to the reception of the understand-ings, and rendering them interesting to the hearts,of our attentive readers !
  45. 45. CHAPTER IV. ON THE PRINCIPLE OF SPHERES, AS UNFOLDED IN THE COMMUNICATIONS OF SWEDENBORG.So numerous are the evils arising from a false ideapredicated on a true principle, or in other words,from the misunderstanding of such a principle, thatit is highly important to guard, if possible, againstthis prolific source of pain. It bas, we helieve, beenan idea of many persons, probably arising from amisapprehension of the eternal unity of God, thatthe blessed Author of all creation is an "wni1)(1Tsa1ens, or central fire, destitute of all form 1" Thatthis (as we esteem it) false, pernicious, and ground-letl8 idea, may not he encouraged by any thing thatbas here been advanced, we would add a word ofexplanation. To exclude the very natura! thought,that because the material sun being a globular body,and, st the BaIne time, u. type of the spiritual sun,that that glorious luminary, which is asserted to hethe fountain of life, is also s globular body ofspiritual fire, we must endeavour to give, from thenew revelation, some elucidation of this very im-portant point. We are informed, then, that theerror herein (which i.tI surely u. very natura! one)
  46. 46. 44 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.has arisen entirely from supposing the spiritual sunto be the Supreme Being Himself, when it is, inreality, only that emanating sphere of His divineand essential constituents, love and wisdom; as thematerial suns light and heat are not the real body,but only an emanation from it. N ow, let any re-flecting and rational man inquire of himself, if, inthe inmost thought of his soul, he can conceive of a.God without a form! Clion he even try to fix histhought on any possible thing, without its imme-diately presenting itself to his intellectual vision,in a form ~ Clion any essence exist without a form ~ Does it not, then, appear almost like profanity, toimagine the Deity in a globular or any other formthan the human ~ If we cannot think intently onGod without imagining him in a form,...,...if the humanis the most perfect form ever presented to our imaginations, and we are continuaIly, in the W ordof God, enjoined to "keep God always before oureyes," how can we obey this divine injunction, but by thinking of him as a Divine Ruman Being ~ Clion it be conceived possible, tha,t supreme wisdom, which embraces every variety and degree of know- ledge, could exist and operate the wonderful works of creation, without the various instrumental powers with which man, in humble imitation of his Maker, brings that knowledge into action or use ~ Clion it be possible to believe, that perfect, divine love, which is surely a complex source of aIl the bene- volent affections, can exist and diffuse itself over creation, without form, or in any other than that of
  47. 47. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 45 a Divine Ruman form 1 That the common sense of man acknowledges this essential trnth, and pro- claims it, is, in a measure, proved by the manner of worship and addI;ess to Him, from the people of ail nations and ages. Do we not universaUy ascriOO to Him, as the Parent of creation, all the powers, both intel1ectual and personal, which properly 00- long to man 1 Yet knowing Him to be infinite andeternal, the "Alpha and Omega," "without OOgin- ning of Jays or end of years," we cannot doubt, that our derivation from Him as a parent, and our subsistence in and through Him aschildren, must he of a kind altogether different from our natu- ra! conceptions on these subjects. Accordingly we find, on investigation, that between spiritual and natural ideas there is this wide difference: natura! conceptions are aU confined within the narrow bounds of space and time, and do not rise to any thing of spirit: whereas spiritual concep- tions do not admit into them any thing of time or space. We can neither measure or weigh, literally, a thought or feeling. For we can instantaneously, or in no time, extend any object of mental vision to immensity, or reduce it to extreme minuteness. Thus we must raise our ideas above nature, with it8 time and space, into the regions of spiritual light and life, before we can form any just conception of the" Father of our spirits," who is himself a Spirit j,and to approach and resemble whom, we must worship Rim in "spirit and in trnth." It may also 00 observed, that were the Supreme Being con-
  48. 48. 46 RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.ceived ta he in any other than a human form, weshould, doubtless, use the neuter and not the mas-culine gender in our terms of address ta him. Aswe can form no conception, then, of a gloriouslygood, and greatly intelligent, Being, in any otherthan a human form, and as in his Roly W ord it isdistinctly ass!Jrted, that " Gad made man in his ownimage and likeness," it is surely reasonable, it issurely consonant with true wisdom, ta imagine andhelieve the Supreme Beingto he in a Divinely Rumanform. In what various and wonderful respects thedivine transcends the merely natural human, is a.subject tao vast for our present consideration; wewish only to show, that it harmonizes with thehighest wisdom of aIl past ages, and is, therefore,worthy ta be considered as established on the firmground of undisputed truth. Respecting, however, the blessed sun of the spi-ritual world, the glorious sphere of divinely unitedlove and wisdom, which is for ever emanating fromthe Deity, we would make some further observa--tions. It is, we helieve, a weIl known and estab-lished fact in natural philosophy, that there is con-stantly emitted from every created body a somewhatof itself, which finds a recipient in the atmospherethat encompasses the earth, and there produces itsdegree of use. That this emission and this consequent use a:redrawn forth by the benign influence of the sunslight and heat, is also weIl known and acknow-ledged. In this natural fact we behold a striking,
  49. 49. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 47 powerful, and interesting emblem or type, and, we think, a beautiful illustration of the existence and eternal operation of the spiritual sun, which, ever diffusing its glorious rays, by its vivifying influence of love and wisdom, or spiritual light and heat, gives life and activity, with the consequent power of exertion, to every created being. But as thematerial sun receives the very power of performingits uses in the natural world, from the glorious sunof the spiritual world, there is between the twoluminaries this aIl-important distinction, that thespiritual sun is replete with perfect life, becauseGad dweIls in its centre j while the natural sun,having only the appearance of life, is in itself merematter, or perfect death. In aIl things which areproximately brought into life, and supported inexistence by the natural sun, there is only apparentlife, but real death; but in aIl things which arecreated and upheld by the immediate influence ofthe spiritual sun, there is a principle of eternal life.The very atmosphere of the spiritual world, fiowingfrom the fountain of life, and being consequentlyspiritual, is the means of supporting spiritual lifein its recipients; as the atmosphere of the naturalworld is a means of the existence and subsistenceof its natural inhabitants. In man, indeed, whileexisting on the natural earths, are united the oppo-site principles of the two suns, which are life anddeath, spirit and matter, soul and body. As theoriginal constituent principles of spiritual life arelove and wisdom, so the absence of these is spiritual
  50. 50. 48 RELIGION AND PHLLOSOPHY UNITED.death. As the pervading influence of the naturalsuns light and heat extends even to the centre oNhevarious earths over which he reigns, drawing fromèvery varied body its responsive effort toward thegeneral good j so does the glorious sphere of thespiritual sun diffuse its benign fervors and cheeringlight through infinitude, every where pouring itsglories into the willing recipient, and exciting in,or calling forth from, that recipient, a correspondingemission of its own degree of received life. Whenceissues, from every intelligent being as well as fromevery natural body, a sphere or emanation of itsparticular principles or degree of life, which is itsmeasure of united goodness and truth, derived fromits original and glorious fountain of di vine love and wisdom, or else the same heavenly principle reducedand perverted, till at length converted to theiropposites. Finding in outward nature so beautifula counterpart to this doctrine of spiritual spheres, we think it not fanaticism to conclude that it isfounded on a truly philosophical principle. Yet we have herein given but the germ j in its farther development and illustration it proves its origin to the opening mind, like the sun bursting from the horizon, and gradually reaching its glorious zenith.
  51. 51. CHAPTER V. ON THE PRINCIPLE OF DEGREES, AS COMMUNICATED BY THE SAME FAITHFUL MESSENGER. WE are also informed, that "there are three de- grees of two kinds," viz., three degrees of love and three of wisdom, which, fiowing from their Divine Author, are, if we may so speak, " distinctly one;" as the divine love and the divine wisdom, which, unconvertible into each other, and therefore eter-nally distinct, are yet, in their source, inseparable.That they are in1a measure separated, or united invarious combinations by their different recipients,will be perceived as soon as their nature is fullyunderstood. But we must, for once, allow ourselvesthe gratification of using the words of our en-lightened author, as none other present themselvesin which we can so concentrate bis highly impor-tant information. He then declares to us, that"degrees are of two kinds, degrees of altitude anddegrees of latitude. The knowledge of degrees is,as it were, a: key to open the causes of things, andenter into them; without this knowledge scarcelyany thing of cause can he known; for the objects
  52. 52. 50 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.and subjeets of both worlds, without it, appear sim-ple, as if there were nothing in them except of a.nature similar to what is seen with the eye, when,nevertheless, this, respectively to the things whichlie interiorly concealed, is as one ta thousands, yea,to myriads. The interior things which lie hid, canby no means be discovered, unless degrees he under-stood; for exterior things proceed ta things interior,and those to the things which are inmost, by de-grees; not by continuous degrees, but by discretedegrees. The term continuous degrees is applied todenote decrements or decreasings from more crassta more subtle, or from denser to rarer; or ratherto denote, as it were, the increments and increasingsfrom more subtle to more crass, or from rarer todenser, like that of light proceeding to shade, or ofheat ta cold. But discrete degrees are entirelydifferent, they are as things prior, pasterior, and pas-treme; or as end, cause, and effect; these are caJleddiscrete degrees, hecause the prior is by itself, theposterior by itself, and the postreme by itself; butstill, when taken tagether, they make one. Theatmospheres from highest ta lowest, or from thesun to the earth, which are ether and air, are dis-crete into such degrees; and there are substances,seemingly simple, the congregate of these atmos-pheres, and again the congregate of these congre-gates, which, when taken together, are called acomposite. These last degrees are called discrete,because they exist distinctly, and are understaodby degrees of altitude; but the former degrees are
  53. 53. RELIGION AND PHIWSOPHY UNITED. 51 continuous, because they continuously increase, and are understood by degrees of latitude." So luminous, to those who are acquainted with the whole of this wonderful revelation, are the discoveries made to us, by this heaven-instructed scribe, that it is hard to find in common language expressions in which to condense his astonishing communications. Yet as misapprehension, and a natural but apparently unfortunate prejudice, have heretofore closed the avenues to this exhaustless mine, some valuable specimens of its contents ma.y excite an honest curiosity in some persons to ex-plore these regions of ineffable wisdom; whencethey cannot fail of bringing into society impor-tant additions to their intellectual wealth. As in every thing, both in the spiritual and natu-rai worlds, there are three degrees of both thesekinds, this knowledge of degrees is, indeed, in itsdevelopment, illustration, and application, a mostimportant key to treasures, whose intrinsic valueand eminent use can be known only on a thorough,patient, and candid examination. It is this exam-iuation which the writer of these pages desires toinduce in the humble and pious mind; fuIly con-vinced, that the reward will more than counter-balance the labour. As there are, however, familialto every one, many interesting and striking illustra-tions, which are so many proofs of the reality of thisprinciple of degrees, it ma.y he useful to presentsome of them in li point of light which will evincetheir derivation from it. It was intima.ted before,
  54. 54. 52 RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.that discrete degrees, or degrees of altitude, arederived one from another, in a series-like end, cause,and effect. Let us endeavour to "illustrate this byexample. It is known by ocular experience, thateach muscle in the human body consists of verysmall fibres, and that these being disposed in fasci-cles, constitute the larger fibres, which are calledmoving fibres, and that from collections of thelatter exists that compound which is called amuscle. It is the same with nerves; in them, fromvery small fibres, are composed larger fibres, whichappear as filaments, and from a collection of theseis a nerve compounded. The case is the same inother compaginations, confasciations, and collec-tions, of which the organs and viscera consist; forthese are compositions from fibres and vesselsvariously formed by similar degrees. The case isthe same, also, with aIl and every thing of thevegetable kingdom, and aIl and every thing of themineraI kingdom; in the different kinds of woodthere are compaginations of filaments in a threefoldorder; in metaIs and stones there are conglobationsof parts, also in a threefold order. From theseconsiderations it appears what discrete degrees are,viz., that one is formed ttom another, and by meansof the other a third, which is called composite; andthat each degree is discrete from another. Renee,conclusions may be formed respecting those thingswhich do not appear before our eyes, because thecase is the same with them as with the organicRubstances, which are the receptacles and habita-
  55. 55. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 53tions of the thoughts and affections in the brain;with the atmospheres; with heat and light, andwith love and wisdom;. for the atmospheres are thereceptacles of heat and light, as heat and light arereceptacles of love and wisdom; of consequence,sinee there are degrees of atmospheres, there arealso similar degrees of heat and light, and similar oflove and wisdom; for the ratio (particular constitu-tion and relation) of the latter is not different from that of the former." The reasoning. by which our respected Author connects these degrees in external nature withtheir Glorions First Cause, is strikingly conclusiveand beautiful; and not less so his important dis-tinction between the two kinds of degrees; showingthat much being already known in the world re-specting continuous degrees, or degrees of latitude,bis ditlCOveries, or communications respecting thespiritual world, were not so much connected with01 dependent on those, as on the explanation of dis-crete degrees or degrees of altitude, respecting whichmueh greater ignorance prevails. To concentrate and abridge, and yet render intel-ligible, the vast mass of information contained inthis luminous and highly important doctrine ofdegrees, is a work we hardly clare attempt, yetknow not how to leave unattempted. There aremany deeply interesting points in theology whichit embraces, illustrates, and enforces with ÏITesistiblepower, to which no language but that of thisA.uthor could do justice; but which (our present
  56. 56. 54 REUGlON AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.object being professedly of a philosophical nature)are, in a measure, extraneous to our purpose. Not,indeed, that true philosophy and religion can everhe really separated, for the former is derived fromthe latter, and connected with it by discrete degrees:in other words, true philosophy is religion exhibitedin ultimate effects. But ll.l we wish here ta confineour attention, in a measure, to these exterior orultimate degrees of life, as the philosophical founda-tions of the New Jerusalem Ohurch may he termed,we will endeavour to give some illustration of thispart of our subject. "That the ultimate degree isthe complex, continent, and basis of the prior de-grees, appears manifestly from the progression ofends and causes to effects; that the effect is thecomplex, continent, and basis of the causes and ends,may be comprehended by enlightened reason; butnot so clearly, that the end, with every thing 00-longing ta it, and the cause with every thing 00-longing ta it, actually exist in the effect, and thatthe effect is the full complex of them. That thecase is 80, may appear from what haB been pre-mised, and particularly from the following consider-ations, that one is from the other in a triplicateseries; and that the effect is nothing else but thecause in its ultimate; and forasmuch as the ulti-mate is the complex, it follows that the ultimate isthe continent and the basis. * As ta what relates • Bere we see the reasoning, on which is fonnded an idea, hem-after expressed, that spiritual existences cannot operate in extema!act, nntil they baye been formed and fixed by an ultimate existence
  57. 57. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 55to love and wisdom, love is thé end, wisdom theinstrumental cause, and use is the effect j and useis the complex, continent, and basis of wisdom andlove j and use is Buch a complex ~nd such a con-tinent, that the whole of love and the whole ofwisdom are actually in it, it heing the simultaneousexistence of them. But it is weU to he observed,that aU the things of love and wisdom, which arehomogeneous and concordant, exist in use, accordingto what was said and shown above." From this doctrine it appears, then, that matteris the continent and basis of spirit. The wholesystem of nature, one grand effect, containingwithin itself its glorious cause and end. Doesnot this principle beautifully harmonîze with thatof the 8pheres, a faint sketch of which is givenabove 1 Does it not unfold man to himself, andGod to man 1 Does it not correspond with thegeneral sentiment of the good and wise in aU agesand nations, that God is in, every thing 1 But there is one additional and important prin-ciple, the explanation of which may throw BOmeperhaps needed light on what is advanced above.on sorne natura! earth; and that, of course, all angels and devilswere once natural beings like ourselves. This assertion opens anextensive field of argument; which is, however, but accomplishingone abject of the writer. Thus, our blessed Saviour "came Dot 10IeIld peace but a sword on the earth."
  58. 58. CRAPTER VI. ON THE PRINCIPLE OF CORRESPONDENCE, AS DEVELOPED BY THE SAME.To explain clearly the principle of Correspondence,is not, we fear, an easy task; but that it reallyexists, and is a substantial and highly importantprinciple in creation, we hope to show by illus-tration. Correspondence, we may BaY, arises from thatresponsive emission of its individual degree of life, which every recipient returns to its bountifulDonor. It is that refiective power which receivesand returns the image of the Great Original; whichreceipt and return, though ever the Bame in essence,are infinite in degrees and in variety, according totheir infinite source, and to their recipient subjects;thus combining eternal unitYwith illimitable diver-sity. We have said above, that the heat and lightfiowing from the sun of heaven, the glorious sphere.ever emanating from the Supreme Being, or the Divine Proceeding, called in Scripture the Roly Spirit, is, in its essence, divine love, clothed in divine wisdom, for heat is within light. This blessed Spirit, this heavenly Sun, bas, in forming
  59. 59. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 57 man, prepared two receptacles for itself, which are the will and the understanding; the will receives the spiritual heat of the divine love, the understalld- ing the spiritual light of divine wÏsdom. These receptacles constitute the soul of man. When filled by the reception of the Roly Spirit, and thus ren- dered active, they constitute the perfect, the eternal life of man. But that they may he brought into action in this world of ultimates, something more is necessary than the mere will and understanding, for they can act only in organized forros. Sa far, they are only spiritual forInS, and can operate only in the spiritual world or region, nor indeed even there, until they have been fixed and ultimated in external nature. They must find their correspond- ent receptacles in this natural world, by which they can operate here, before they have power to develop theIIUlelves in external act. In the heartand lungs of the human materia1 body, they findthis perfect correspondence. As, however, it iswell known that human life has itsorigin in thebrain, we will quote some passages from our author,illustrative of this fset in anatomy. "That the life of man, in its principles, is in thebrains, and in its principiates in the body. In itsprinciples is in its beginnings, and in its principiatesis in the parts produced and formed from its begin-nings; and by life (which is the spirit of God) inits principles, is meant the will and the understand-ing. These two are what in the brains are in theirprinciples, and in the body in their principiates. E
  60. 60. 58 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNiTED. That the principles or beginnings of mans life are in the brains, is manifest,-l. From the sense itself, in that when a man applies his mind to any thingand thinks, he perceives that he thinks in the brain; he draws inwardly, as it were, his eyesight, and keeps his forehead intense, and perceives that there is inwardly a speculation, chiefly within the fore- head and somewhat above. 2. From the formationof man in the womb, in that the brains or the head is the first, and that this, for a long time afterwards, is larger than the body. 3. That the head is aboveand the body below; and it is according to order,that superiors should act upon inferiors, and notvice versa. 4. That when the brain is hurt eitherin the womb, or by a wound or by disease or bytoo great application, thought is debilitated andsometimes the mind is delirious. 5. That aU theexternal senses of the body, which are the sight, thehearing, the smell and taste, together with thegeneral sense which is the feeling, as also thespeech, are in the anterior part of the head, whichi~ called the face, and have immediate communica-tion with the brain, and derive thence their sensi-tive and active life. 6. Hence it is that the affec-tions, which are of love, appear in a certain imagein the face, and that the thoughts, which are ofwisdom, appear in a certain light in the eyes." Itappears, then, that the brain is the immediate re-ceptacle of mans first principles, which are the willand the understanding; and these the immediatereceptacles of life, which is the Spirit of Gad, or
  61. 61. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. b9love and wisdom. These first principles, the willand the understanding, are from the brain diffused through the whole body. We will now endeavour to show, "that there isa correspondence of all things of the mind with 11.11things of the body. This is new, because it hasnot heretofore been known, by reason that it wasnot known what spiritual is, and what is its differ-ence from natural, and therefore it was not knownwhat correspondence is j for there is a correspond-ence of spiritual things with natural things, andby it a conjunction of them. It is said, that here-tofore it was not known what spiritual is, and whatits correspondence is with natural, and consequentlywhat correspondence is-but still both might havebeen known. Who does not know that affectionand thought are spiritual, and thence that 11.11 thingsof affection and thought are spiritual 1 Who doesnot know that action and speech are natura1, andthence that aU things of action and speech arenatural1 Who does not know that affection andthought, which are spiritual, cause a man to actand speak 1 Who may not thence know whatcorrespondence is, of things spiritual with things natural1 Does not thought cause the tongue tospaak; and affection together with thought causethe body to act 1 They are two distinct things: 1 can think and not speak, 1 can will and not act jand it is known that the body does not think and will, but that the thought falls into RpCCCh, and the will into action. Does not affection shine forth in
  62. 62. 60 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.the face, and present therein a type of itself. Thisevery one knOWs. ls not the a.ffection, consideredin itself spiritual, and the changes of the face, whichare alao caHed the countenance, uatural1 Whomight not thence have concluded that there is a cor-respondence, and consequently that there is corres-pondence of all things of the mind with all thingsof the body1 A.nd forasmuch as aH things of themind have relation to affection and thought, orwhat is the same, to the will and the understand-ing, and aH things of the body to the heart and thelungs, that there is a correspondence of the willwith the heart, and of the understanding with thelungs. That such things have not been known,although they might have been known, is by reason,that man was become so external, that he wouldacknowledge nothing but what was natural. Thiswas the delight of his love (or the delight of hisheart), and thence the delight of his understanding;wherefore to elevate his thoughts above the naturalprinciple to any thing spiritual separate from thenatura!, was unpleasant to him; therefore he couldnot think otherwise from bis natural love and de-light, than that the spiritual principle was apurernatural principle, and that correspondence was asomewhat fiowing in by continuity, yea, the merenatural man caunot think any thing separate fromwhat is natural, this to him being nothing. Afarther reason why these things have not heretoforebeen sean and known, is because aH things of reli-gion, which are called spiritual, have been removed
  63. 63. RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED. 61 out of the sight of man by this dogma received iuthe whole Christian world, that things theological, which are spiritual, and which the councils and leaders of the church have concluded upon, are blindly to he helieved, because, say they, they trau- scend the understanding." "The correspondence ofthe will and the understanding with the heart and the lungs cannot he nakedly confirmed, that is, by things rational alone, but they InaY by effects j thecase herein is similar as with the causes of things jthese, indeed, may be Beon rationally, but not clear- ly, except by effects, for the causes are in the effects and give themselves to be seen through them; neither does the mind, before seeing effects, confirmitself concerning cau!!es: the effects of this corres- pondence shall be delivered in what follows." To accompany ouI Author through these varions effects, by which alone his doctrine can be fullyproved and enforced, would require that deep in-terest in the subject, which they only who knowits importancé could he expected to feel. But asBome few striking illustrations of the operations ofthe principle in general InaY be seleeted, we willendeavour to perform this service. Though wehave, in the above quotations, attempted to showthe existence of the principle of correspondence inits particular operation between the soul and bodyof man; yet, as hinted previously to these quota-tions, its origin is in the Supreme Being, thencedescending and forming the conjunetive power,through the varions degrees of altitude, from the
  64. 64. 62 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.Divine Head to the feet or extreme of creation,the naturaI earths, said in Scripture to he "Godsfootstool;" which extreme is forever protracting,that is, bcings in the natural worlds are foreverincreasing in number, in correl!pondence with theeternal emanation of divine love from its g:loriou8fountain. Our Âuthor himself has somewhere anobservation to this effect, that particulars are BOnumerous and llO various, as llOmetimes to confusethe mind; and that it is therefore occasionallybetter to explain a subject by universals only, leav-ing the particulars of those universals to some moreappropriate opportunity. For it is an importanttruth among those unfolded by Emanuel Sweden-borg, that the Divine is the same in the greatest ormost comprehensive, and in the most minute parti-cular of the creation; and this is surely consistentwith the perception of every pious and reflectingmind, which acknowledges the same blessed hand asfully in the leaf of a plant as in the starry heavens. There cau be no correspondence in the creationmore deeply interesting to man, than that whichsubsists between the Omnipotent Creator and him-self. Yet that there is such a correspondence isgenerally proved by the acknowledgment of t}1ewise and good, that "in Him we live, move, andhave our being;" that "from Him cometh downevery good and perfect gift;" and that to Him isdue from man all the gratitude, obedience, and loveof loyal subjects to their true and perfect King.But, of even this very generaI view of the corres-
  65. 65. RELIGION A.ffi PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 63pondence of man with the Deity, little we believeis really understaod. We acknowledge, indeed, thetruth, that "in Gad we live, move, and have ourbeing;" but this acknowledgment is made not samuch because we see with the understanding thatit il! so, as because we perceive that we cannot up-hold ourselves in life or health, or without divine&id procure for ourselves those things which arerequisite for our support. But we will endeavourta show, by the clear light of reason, that thething Ül really as piety teaches us ta believe. Wehave samewhere before g!anced at the primaryand important truth, that Gad is in form a Man.On a clear and decided perception of this truth somuch depends, that we cannot proceed withoutendeavouring ta illustrate it in the language of ourexcellent Author : "Of how great importance it is to have a justidea of Gad, may appear from this consideration,that the idea of God constitutes the inmost thoughtof ail those who have any religion, for ail things ofreligion and divine worship have respect ta God:and ina.!much as God is universallyand particularly in all things of religion and worship, therefore un- less it be II. just ides of God, no communication can he given with the heavens: hence it is, that in the spiritual world every nation has its place accord- ing ta its idea of God as Man for in this and in no other il! the ides of the Lord. That the state of every man8 life after desth is according ta the idea of Gad which he has confirmed in himself, appears
  66. 66. 64 RELIGION AND PHlLOSOPHY UNITED.manifestly from the reverse of the proposition, viz.,that the negation of God constitutes hell, and inthe Christian world, the negation of the LordsDivinity." It is farther asserted and morallyproved, "that to he, and to must, in God-Man aredistinctly one. Where there is an essence, there isalso an existence: one is not possible without theother; for essence is by or in existence, and notwithout it. This the rational comprehends, whenit thinks whether there can he any essence whichdoes not exist, and whether there can he any exis-tence but from an essence; and inasmuch as oneexists with and not without the other, it followsthat they are one, but distinctly one. They aredistinctly one, as is the case with love and wisdom;for love is essence, and wisdom existence, inasmuchas love does not exist but in wisdom, nor wisdombut from love; wherefore when love is in wisdom,then it exists. These two are such an one, thatthey may be distinguished, indeed, in thought, butnot in act; and inasmuch as they may be distin-guished in thought but not in act, therefore it issaid they are distinctly one. Essence and existencein God-Man are also distinctly one as soul andbody; soul does not exist without its body, norbody without its soul. It is the divine soul of God-Man which is understood by the divine essence,and the divine body which is understood by thedivine existence. That a soul can exist without abody, and exercise thought and wisdom, is an errorproceeding from fallacies; for every soul of man is
  67. 67. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 65in a spiritual body, which fully appears after it hasput off ita material covering, which it carried aboutwith it in the world.-The reason why an essenceis not an essence unless it exista, is, because it isnot before in a form, and that which is not in aform has not a quality, and that which has nota quality, is not any thing. That which existafrom an essence makes one with the essence, byreason that it is from the essence; hence there isan uniting into one, and hence it is that one isthe others mutually and reciprocally, also, thatone is aIl in all, in the other as in itself.-Hence it may appear, that 000 is [necessarily in aform and consequently] a Man, and thereby He isa God existing, not existing from Himself, but inHim.self. He who exista in Him.self, is God, fromwhom all things are." The reason given, in anotherpart of these workll, why God exista in the humanform, in preference to every other, is, that thehuman is, in tmth, the most perfect of aIl forms,uniting in itself the highest possible perfections ofall possible forms. The correspondence of man,then, with bis Maker, in tbis most glorious of aIlforms, must constitute the ground of bis highe.ltexcellence, the perfection of bis being. Thus in000, in His form, in His spirit, we verily do "live,move, and have our being;" that" from Him comethdown every good and perfect gift," is proved in theposition, "that there is oue God-Man from whomall things are, and in whom infinite things are diE-tinctlyone."
  68. 68. 66 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. To trace this beautiful and striking correspond-euce through the numerous and various particu-lara of the essence and existence of man, would he,to ourselves, a most delightful task, but to ourreaders, perhaps, a wearisome one; we will there-fore endeavour to conclude the sketch, which wedesired to give of the philosophical principles ofthe New J erusalem Church, by one more illustra-tion of the principle of correspondence, drawn fromits existence and operation in the W ord of God,or Holy Scriptures. That the long and uninterrupted possession of ablessïng, is apt to render us insensible to its realand full worth, though doubtless a trite observation,is not the less true; and it is, we fear, but twoapplicable to our estimation of that truly heavenlytreasure, that "pearl of great priee," which wepossess in the blessed Scriptures. It has, we conceive, become extremely obscure,and even doubtful, in the present age, to the mostlearned and enlightened minds, how and in whatsense the Scriptures are the W ord of God. Theyfind themselves, apparently, necessitated to reject,first one part and then another, and at length queryin what part, and in what manner its sanctity exista.This is, we cannot doubt, a necessary consequenceof the misapprehension which too generally pre-vails respecting its Divine Author. Were it inheart acknowledged, that the Supreme Being is,indeed, our own perfect Prototype, thus sendingforth, by divine speech, His holy will, a great part
  69. 69. RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 67of the difficulty would vanish. Were it fartherunderstood that the word of divine truth, deliveredin the heavens, must descend by degrees to thevarious intelligences of the celestial and spiritualregions, and thus be prepared, by correspondence,to meet its less and less perfect recipients; weshould also perceive, that when it appears in ulti-mate, material nature, it must be so veiled andobscured by the grossness of its final vehicle, as torender its original and divine excellence almostimperceptible. We should then, too, easily com-prehend why we accordingly find the externalW ord in this obscured and darkened state, ex-hibiting only here and there glimpses, as it were,of its internaI effulgence. As it is believed, how-ever, that man is formed with a capacity to rise onthe seale of being in endless progression, and thathis spiritual existence and subsistence is and canbe alone from the source or W ord of divine truth,-it may weH be conceived, that that glorious W ordmust be formed to accompany and support him in this upward progress; that if his spiritual birth takes place, and his growth continues to such a degree, that the "sincere milk of the W ord" be not sufficiently nutritious for him, in that W ord shall surely be found the stronger "meat and drink indeed," which shaH sustain and still continue to nourish him in that spiritual growth. We uni- versally find, that children, in this natural world, are taught and led by appearances. They at first imagine that, like themselves, every thing has life
  70. 70. 68 RELIGION AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED.and feeling; and as they advance in age, these ap-pearances, which we find variously useful in bring-ing forward the powers of the mind, are graduallydissipated, and leave them in perception of thereal truth. Thus the spiritual life of man is formedfirst by appearances of truth in thll natural or literaisense of the Scriptures; which, however, is broken,desultory, and sometimes enigmatical, that thisgrowing mind may he excited to search deep andmore deeply. Above, or through the merely literai sense, isgenerally perceived, by the refiecting mind, a morerational and refined meaning or train of sentiment,from which spring the innumerable variety of doc-trines, or different combinations of tenets, whichform the various sects that have filled the religiousworld. This variety of construction must probablycontinue, in conformity to the different views ofmankind, till the literaI or external sense is uni-versally found and believed to be only the naturalcovering or body, containing a soul or spirit, accord-ing to the information of our blessed Saviour:"Hear my words, for they are spirit and they arelife." The spiritual sense of the 8criptures, how.ever, far from treating of the illusory and changingscenes and objects of this momentary existence (asthe literaI sense surely does), opens, unfolds, andexplains the formation, birth, and mode of existenceof the spiritual man, the true church of God;which, together with the progress of this spiritualman through the states of infancy and childhood to
  71. 71. RELIGION .AND PHILOSOPHY UNITED. 69 DUl.turity, is nothing less than the regeneration or new birth and life, which our Saviour informs us, in literaI language, must take place in every indi-vidual, before he can see the kingdom of heaven. Thus this spiritual sense of the W ord feeds the_hungry and satisp.es the thirsty soul, with theheavenly food and drink of etemallife, the know-ledge and power to practise goodness in truth.Ever thus enlarging the views and exalting themind, by instructing it in the substantial princi-pIes of spiritual wisdom, its wonders and delightshave "not entered into the heart of the merelynatural, man to conceive;" but with an indistincthope of which, the truly pious mind haB been andever will be supported and upheld, through thesoul-searching scenes of this probationary state.As truths are, then, we conceive, a foundation,"sure and steadfast as their source, the Rock ofAges," it cannot, we think, but be evident to everyreflecting mind, that in the knowledge and use ofthe glorious truths and goods, thus opened and un-folded ta the strengthened soul, it shall find thatsolid and never failing foundation for its everlastinghope and trust. That there are contained, then, in the holy W ord,degrees of divine truth, the spiritual within, andentirely distinct from, the natural, as the soul is with-in, and distinct from, the body of man; and withinthe spiritual, the still more perfect, the celestialdegree, treating entirely of the descent of our Lordinto ultimate nature, and His ascent thence to His

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