DOCTRINA GENUINI VERI{~lE                    fI If     EMANUEL SWEDENBORG  DO MINI JESU CHRIsrI SF.RVUf;    SIXTH PASCiCLE...
DE HEMELSCHE LEER              A MONTHLY tIiAGAZINEDEVOTED TO THE DOOTRINE OF GENUINE TRUTH OUT OF THE LATI1 WOR) REEALEO ...
LEADING THESES PROPOUNDED IN            "DE HEMELSCHE LEER"  1. The W1itings of Emanuel Swedenborg aJe the ThiniTestament ...
CONTENTS   Leading Theses propounded in DE HEMELSCHELEER                                               ..       2   An Add...
DE HEMELSOHE LEEREXTRACT :FROM lHE ISSUE FOR MARCH 1935  TO LIVE A LIFE FOIJLOWING lHE DOCTRINE                     BY ANT...
8                     ANTON ZELLlNGsoul, and with aIl thy mind", and "10 love thy neighbouras thyself". The neighbour is t...
TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE               9  the blessedness into the eternal" , D.L.W. 395. Now this  life he c...
10                     ANTON ZELLINGacknowledge Him. To "live a life following the Doctrine" on the other hand is to allow...
TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE               11other hand: "If only 1 know, but nevertheless this must bein enlight...
12                    ANTO~   ZELLINGl1     in a full application, and if that were not so, how brokenly,i    how beaten d...
10 LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE             13Lord, who is in the good of love and of charity, in thetruths of Doctr...
14                    ANTON ZELLINGhis perceptions, which are also receptions. To live a life following the Doctrine for h...
TO LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE               15whom one hates the other. It is clear that the lejecterconceives of ...
,~     16                    :NTüN ZELLING      taking up and the fitting in of the expression "to read the      Word holi...
TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE             17truths of Doctrine and of faith with man out of the W ord,and to make ...
18                    .NTON ZELUNGleast the diversions". No, these tao will have at some timeta participate in the celesti...
10 LiVE A LlFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE                19     so far, e content ourselves with passing off every thought    ...
20                   ANTON ZELLING~iJ th~y lixed_oJLLQLthemselves with ineffable felicity",A.C. 1735. The greater the inno...
DE HEMELSCHE LEEREXlRACT FROM THE ISSUE FOR APRIL 1935 ro LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING lHE DocrRINE                    El" ANTON ...
22                    ANTON ZELLINGof the Lord. A taking up, a "eceptio, in :ITill and under­standing, with the life, with...
10 LIVE A LIFE FOLLOW[NG THE nOCTRINE TI            23pro in p,o-p"iztm, for or as, signifies the appearance as ifit were ...
24                    ANTON ZELLINGthings left back, things which remain behind. Undoubt­edly, mans own things make his po...
TO LlVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE II              25Mary which the Lord put off entirely. Thus seen, the LordsGlorific...
26                     .NTON ZELLTNGthey are ravelling wolves, Matth. VII : 15. So it happonsthat we in ourselves, al one ...
TU LTVE , LlFE FOLLOWlNG TIlE nOCTRINE TI            27the soul, or of the spirit which operates therein, and 1wondered th...
28                     ANTON ZELLINGis one of the many fonus in which the possessive propriumacts as disturber, as lejecte...
TO LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWING TUE DOCTRINE II              29contents as forms-alone, as mere cognitions, mere cultures.    Thi...
30                    .·NTOJ ZELLING         Ancient Church, in the Hebrew, Jewish, primitive Chris­         tian, and ~w ...
TU LIVE . LlFE FOLLOWING THE /)OCTRINE            [l   31pointed everywhere and yet indefatigably, Vould be seekingfor the...
1        32                    ANTON ZELLING    1   Apocalypse on the Angels of the Churches, do they concern·        the ...
L
nDE HEMELSCHE LEEREXTRACTS FROM THE ISSUE FOR AUGUST 1935lO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING rHE nOCTRINE                    BY ANTON...
38                     :NTON ZELLINGand the free, both in the understanding having come to astand, to a position, to an at...
TO LIVE , LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE III            39more 01 less unfolds the internaI sense of the Lords words:"He that...
40                     ANTON ZELLINGtheoretical in the practical, behold here the Regenerationin its victorious advance, i...
TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE III                 41is derived from the sanskrit ar, that is, to go, to strive upw...
42                     .NTüN ZELLINGfor society is societas, of which the root soc is also derivedfrom sequor and means ta...
TO LIVE . LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE lU                 43follows us everywhere. The language is ftûl of it, and in theVo...
44                    ANTON    ZELLINGof life come to belong ta life" means that in so much asman aUows "that the influx f...
Ta LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE III              45voluntary and the intellectual. II. That in thc beginningthe poss...
46                     ANTON ZELLINGwishes to keep to that, assumes a· semblance of a piet.1, asimplicity, an innocence, w...
10 LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWlNG THE DOCTRINE III             47to be blasphemed". Now this anew, but nO7 with the full estweight,...
48                    ANTON ZELLING  regards the worlds nobility, the same may be said as  of fonner churches: "By not kee...
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Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938
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Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938

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Anton zelling-contribution-to-de-hemelsche-leer-1934-1938

  1. 1. DOCTRINA GENUINI VERI{~lE fI If EMANUEL SWEDENBORG DO MINI JESU CHRIsrI SF.RVUf; SIXTH PASCiCLE EXlRAUTS FROM lHE ISSUES ~OVEMBER 193~-AUGUSl 1~~6
  2. 2. DE HEMELSCHE LEER A MONTHLY tIiAGAZINEDEVOTED TO THE DOOTRINE OF GENUINE TRUTH OUT OF THE LATI1 WOR) REEALEO FROM THE LORD OnGA~ OF THE FlRST DUTCH SOCIETY OF THE GE1EHAL CHURCH OF THE NEW.JERUSALEM EXTRACTS FHOM THE ISSUES NOVEMBEB l!}34 TO AUGUST 1931; (ENGLISH THANSLATlON AND E:GLfSH ORIGINALS) SIXTH FASCICL!: s-GRAVENHAGE SWEDENBORG GENOOTSCHAP NASSAUPLEI~ 29 193;
  3. 3. LEADING THESES PROPOUNDED IN "DE HEMELSCHE LEER" 1. The W1itings of Emanuel Swedenborg aJe the ThiniTestament of the W ord of the Lord, The DOCTRINE OFTHE NEW JERUSALEM CONCERNING THE SACRED SCRIP­TURE tnust be applied to the three Testaments alike. 2. The Latin W ord without Doctrine is as Ct candlestickwithOl~t light, and those who read the Latin Word with­out Doctrine, m who do not acquire for themselves aDoctrine {rom the Latin Ward, are in dmkness as to aUtntth (cf. S.S. 50-61). 8. The genuine Doct1ine of the Church is spiritual metof celestial origin, but not out of rational origin. The Lordis that Doctrine itself (cf. A.C. 2496, 2497, 2510, 2516,2.533, 2859; A.E. 19). MEMORABILIA 1312 "Si veritates ut t/l-eses seu principia accipiunt, tunc veritatesinnume1ae detegunt10" et ol1mia confirmant". "If they accept truths as theses or principles, then innumerabletruths are detected, and aIl things confirm".
  4. 4. CONTENTS Leading Theses propounded in DE HEMELSCHELEER .. 2 An Address on the Occasion of the Dedication of theNew C7wrch-Building, by H. D. G. Groeneveld. 3 To live a Life following the Doctrine l, by Anton~iEg . . .. 7 To live a Life following the Doctrine II, by AntonZelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . :-:-- . 21----- The Nineteenth of June 1935, H. D. G. Groeneveld . 33 To live a Life following the Doctrine III, by AntQ.nZelling . . . . . 37 T1-:a gedy and Regeneration, by Norman Williams 63 The Holy Spirit, by Rev. Elmo C. Acton . 75 "Nunc Licet", by J. li. Ridgway . 91 Editorial, by Rev. Ernst Pfeiffer. 101 The Chu.rc7~ as ou.r Spiritual Mother, by Rev.Hendrik W. Boef 104 Faith and to Believe l, by Anton ZJ,1lling 116 Faith and to Believe II, by A~.Ûling 121 Cornnmnications, by Anton Zelling, Prof. dr. Char-les H. van Os, Rev. Theodore Pitcairn, C. P. Geluk,N. J. Vellenga, H. M. Haverman, Rev. Albert Bjorck 157 The New Will and New Understanding which arethe Lords with Man, by Rev. Theodore Pitcairn. 167 New Things, by Anton Zellin~ . 171 Comnl1fnications, by ~ton Z~ing . 201
  5. 5. DE HEMELSOHE LEEREXTRACT :FROM lHE ISSUE FOR MARCH 1935 TO LIVE A LIFE FOIJLOWING lHE DOCTRINE BY ANTON ZELLING. "When therefo?e ye shall see the ab.ornination of desolation, signifies the devastation of the Church.... Which was told of by Daniel the prophet, signifies ... everything prophetie con­ cerning the Lords Advent and concerning the state of the Church.... Standing in the holy place, signifies devastation as to aIl things which are of good and truth; the holy place is the state of love and faith.... LET HlM THAT READETH UNDER­ STAND, signifies that these things are to be weIl observed by those who are in the Church, especially by those who are in love and faith". A.C.3652. lhe Latin for "foUowing" [according to] is secundum,from sequor: something which immediately foUows, as 2follows from 1 (hence the meaning of secundus: the nextfollowing, the second), as the effect from a cause; aU effectis according to or following the cause. lhe Latin word for"foUowing" [according to] also signifies: to willingly fol­low, along with the stream, well disposed to, prosperous,happy; the Greek word for "following" further signifies:altogether, fully, near, to, at, in. This secundurn a.lso lies involved in: "Hoc est llrimum etmagnum Mandatum; secundum simile est illi" ("This isthe first and great Commandment; the second is like untoit"), Matth. XXII: 38,39. To live a life following theDoctrine is the second which is like unto the Doctrine. Itis said to live, not, to do, to act, to conduct ones self, noranything else. Now to live is to love and to hold holy whatis of Life and to be filled with that Life more and more."To love God and the neighbour is of life because the aHoI life is ôf love";" A..C.- 938~ Thüs-i.ïl"living a life fol­lowing the Doctrine" the two Commandments are fulfiUed:"To love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, with aH thy
  6. 6. 8 ANTON ZELLlNGsoul, and with aIl thy mind", and "10 love thy neighbouras thyself". The neighbour is the Lord in the neighbour,the Doctrine of the neighbour. The first commandmentrefers to the Lord, the second to the angelic Heaven in theblessed consociation of aIl with each and of each with aIl. 80too the Doctrine refers to the Lord, and "to live a lifefollowing the Doctrine" to the angelic Heaven on earth orthe Church. Only that lives which lives a life following the Doctrine.AlI living or loving outside of the Doctrine is not life orlove; it remains natural, unreformed, and allows of noregeneration. There are those who accept the Doctrine andreject the life. Of them it is said: "They are present,although sepamted. They are like friends who talk withone another, but have no love for one another; and they ~elike two persons, one of whom speaks to the ôt~~..r_~s __afriend, and yet hates liiin- as an enemy", D.P. 91. It i5acknowledging the Lord with 1he mere cogIl:i~ion ~ndmeanwhile remaining outside the Divine Human and hatingit as an enemy. Man is in the spirit when he is alone, but in the bodywhen he is in company. rherefore in the world it is ll,otso visible who rejects life and who lives a life followingthe Doctrine. From Matthew XXV, verse 34 to the end, iteven appears that they who have lived a life following thcDoctrine, the followers, and they who have rejected the life,the rejecters, are equally ignorant of whether or not havingdone anything "unto one of the least of these My brethren";yea, elsewhere it appears that the followers have not knownof it, and that the rejecters did not know but that they hadprophesiëdîiïtlïe name of the Lord, and in His Name hadcast out devils, and in His Name had done many wonderfulworks, Matth. VII: 22. "10 live a life following theDoctrine" and "to reject life", taken as effects, thus appearexteriorly before and in th.~d as indistigg~1?}e, noless so than the delight. ot cQ.njl!gial~Q:y_~.~nd. t~~L ofscortatory love, and no less so than the p:r~l!échi~K fromthe spiritual sense and the_pr.eaclÜng from the natural sense. "Mans understanding can be raiseda,150ve hiSPfoper loveiuto some light of wisdom iu the love of which the man isnot, and he can thereby see and U!l taught how he must livethat he may come also iuta that lo~, and-ilius may enjoy
  7. 7. TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE 9 the blessedness into the eternal" , D.L.W. 395. Now this life he can either follow or reject; the Doctrine to appear­ ances remains the same; and everything the Doctrine teaches concerning life the lejecter can know as weIl as, if not better than the follower. Seen from a worldly point of view the rejecters are even not so bad and in many things even exemplary. For they who do not reject the Doctrine, but the life, do not therefore reject everything which the Doctrine teaches concerning life. They can even fit it in in an exemplary way, "put it into practice", to such an extent that their fittings in, in public, leave the applications in secret of the followers far in the shade. There is a difference as of an abyss between fitting the truths of the Doctrine inta the life, and applying life to the Doctrine, just as the former life is in no way the latter life. Fitting in is always of something ta something entirely different and which remains entirely different; applying, however, is always of something to something that is distinctly one with it and which becomes more and more the same. Explicare, to unfold, to unpleat, supposes applicme, to fold to, to apply, in order that understanding and will may keep pace with each other, in order that Doc­ trine may become life, and life Doctrine - a one, full of doc­ trine and life. When fitting in, man is not in the love of the wisdom which he fancies he has; when applying, man is in the love of his wisdom. The fitting in is forced compulsion of an indoctrinated proprium, the applying is the freedom of an angelic proprium; the fitting in is made, tyrannical, fanatical; the applying is born, gentle, mild; the fitting in is into heterogeneous things, the applying to homogeneous things. The fitting in of things to life leaves dead, the applying of life makes living and new. Fitting in knows zeal, emulation, rivalry; applying knows quiet steady diligence. The fitting in is with the whole head above out of a certain light of wisdom while the body below remains outside the love of that wisdom; the applying is with the whole heart, the whole soul, and the whole understanding; in short, the fitting in is from the love of self and the world, the -applying is out of the two commandments fuI­ filled. To acknowledge th~2rd and to reject the life isto acknowledge the Son of Man and ta withhold-from Him1 the place where to la;y His head, thus in no way to
  8. 8. 10 ANTON ZELLINGacknowledge Him. To "live a life following the Doctrine" on the other hand is to allow the Lord to make a dwelling with man. To reject life is to retain and carry on ones own life "under the appearance of much praying", that is, under respectable fittings in, in which merit makes itself great. Forthey can glory in and appeal to "many wonderful worksdone". In "CONCERNING THE SACRED SCRIPTURE FROMEXPERIENCE" there occur two reasonings: 1. "1 knowvarious correspondences, l can know the true doctrine ofthe Divine Word, the spiritual sense will teach me it".II. "1 know the Doctrine of Divine truth; now l can seethe spiritual sense, if only l know the correspondences;but nevertheless this must be in enlightenment from theLord, because the spiritual sense is the Divine Truth itselfin its light", n. 21. Clearly the false first reasoning is thatof the lejecter ever ready to fit in. What the follower withreverence calls the "Doctrine of Divine Truth", the lejectercalls "varions correspondences", handled as burglars im-plements. He means to say: "1 can fit those in, l can pushin with them, and force my way". Note how the tone andthe affection in the words of both reasonings differ entirelyas to the life. "1 know various correspondences" has as itsaffection "by no l surely possess sufficient means". Outhe other hand, in "1 know the Doctrine of Divine truth"there is an entirely different tone. "1 know", there does notmean "1 possess". And "if only l know the correspondences"is full of a life fol1owing the Doctrine. This latter knowingis an entirely different knowing from the "1 know" of thefirst reasoning. That first knowing, the rejecters knowing,is, as has been said, a possession, a piece of merememory-knowledge; the latter knowillg "if only l know"is of a life entirely following the Doctrine, in therealization that there is no living science of correspond-ences without a life in agreement with the Doctrineof the Divine truth. Is it not somewhere expressly saidthat there is perception when the external things correspondto the internaI things? Now the follower makes the knowingof correspondences subject to his perception, but thelejecter makes no such fnss - "1 know varions corres-pondences". How false, how full of denial of life thatsounds. And how full of awe and reverence, vibratingwith love and veneration, how living sounds, on the
  9. 9. TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE 11other hand: "If only 1 know, but nevertheless this must bein enlightenment from the Lord". There is the appearancethere, that one could be engaged in the first reasoning,but that he is warned that such reasoning is false: "Thiscannot be donc, but let him say within himself ...",whereupon fol1ows meditation II. But there is no questionthere of one person, but of two, of 1., the separated, II., theconjoined. The lejecter will never accept meditation II,because that can only be accepted in a life fol1owing theDoctrine; and the fol1ower will never fal1 into the falsityof meditation 1., for thereby he would lose the Life in hislife. Meditation 1. is not only a fault of thinking, butespecial1y a fault of life, and an irreparable one. Toappearance an imaginary fault of thinking is there broughtforward, in order the better to show, from the opposite,what is the right thinking. But a separation is here madebetween the goats and the sheep, between those on the lefthand and thosc on the right hand; and in the affection ofthe words we c1early see with whom the Lord inflows outof the good of love and of charity, and with whom He doesnot. The nature of the false things of faults of thinking canhe seen only with and by a life fol1owing the Doctrine. Not the fol1owers, but the rejecters will now ask: "Butwhat then is life, to reject life and to live a life fol1owingthe Doctrine"? at the same time standing ready with the bestof definitions. To begin with, to live a life fol1owing theDoctrine is so much, so everything, that one of middlingunderstanding but who had lived fol1owing the commandoments, after death was seen elevated among the highestAngels as one of them in wisdom. Now any one may deemthat to live a life fol1owing the commandments or theDoctrine is comparatively not so difficult, and possible foralmost every one, and particularly so for the rejecters.Merely a matter of continuous c1ipping, of steady fittingin. But in "living a life fol1owing the Doctrine" infinitearcana are hidden, so infinite that like those of regenerationthey might be termed inexhaustible into the eterna1. Howgross in this respect our ideas are would appear fromthe vain effort to wish to compare our self-examinationbefore the Holy Supper with the examination the Angelsinstitute with the newcomers - both examinations as to the"life followed".We very soon consider the slightest fitting
  10. 10. 12 ANTO~ ZELLINGl1 in a full application, and if that were not so, how brokenly,i how beaten down would we approach to the Roly Supper, with what deepest humiliation would we partake, how im­ measurably overwhelmed would we come away. Row many! worthily acccpt the Grace? Row few the Mercy in deepest humiliation! By the self-examination before the Roly Sup­ pel it may in sorne measure be perceived what Ha life following the Doctrine" should be. The Doctrine or the~ understanding of the W ord is caUed a candIe. A candIe has three things: the flame, the wick, and the wax. In the!~i flame it burns, by the wick it burns, from the wax it burns. Not one of these three things can be lacking, each of these three things of the Doctrinal CandIe, spiritual from celestial origin, is from the Lord; the flame, the plaited threads of the wick, and the bees wax. They who reject the life take away from the wick the wax from which the flame lives and is fed, and surround the now stolen wick with the tallow of their proprium. The effect to outward appearance is the same, the flame is of about the samc heat, the brightness about as stroug; but the one is wax-light, clear. pure, steady, the other tallow-light, smoky, greasy, flicker­ ing. But this only for him who sees from within. The lejecter from without, from the proprium, brings forward evel more fuel; the foUower knows the light is fed from within, and that the Lord provides. Ris sole care full of love and life is that his slender burning wax-candIe remain unspoiled before and from the Lord, pure from hetero­ geneous materials, untouched by draughts thatmake it flicker and drip. In the follower the Lord provides Himself with wax, but the lejecter provides himself with any desirable tallow from his proprium. The wax-light shines on other things than does the tallow-gleam. Other things enter in by the wax­ light than by the tallow-light. The lejecter agrees with the follower that the Lord is the Same with all, and that it is the receptions that differ. But" in this word "reception" a deep arcanum is hidden. The Latin word for "reception" is receptio, which is really a regrasping, retaking. If we hold to this distinction and now read in CONCERNING THE SACRED SRIPTURE FROM EXPERIENCE, n. 8: "The Lord flows in with the Angel and with the man of the Church out of the good of love and of charity; the Angel and the man of the Church RECIPIT (that is, "e,qrasps, retakes) the
  11. 11. 10 LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE 13Lord, who is in the good of love and of charity, in thetruths of Doctrine and of faith with himself out of theWord; thence there is the conjunction which is called thecelestial marriage". N ow the practical1y worn out words"eceive and reception take on an awful sense. A sense thattouches life, every ones life and every kind of life. Forthe rejecters as weIl as the followers can alike be in thetruths of the Doctrine and of faith out of the W ord; let usassume so for a moment. But consider: the Lord inflows withthe Angel and with the man of the Church out of thegood of love and of charity. He who receives the Lord,does not accept Him, but recipit, that is, regrasps Him,Him who was there already, and thus had already beenaccepted, for He who, or that which, inflowed was therealready hefore the receptio. Where, therefore, the re-ceptiois, there is life, and it is life. In art statements of mastersare known which prove they already had a perception of thistruth of life, a confession that they had not made, notsought the things, but had fottnd them in themselves, thatis re-ceptus, retaken or regrasped. What they created, theyacknowledged to have heen there, before it was there.Vith them there is no question of mere coincidences. Thesimple follower believes this simply; the lejecter agrees toan aeeeptance, a taking on, a taking over, hut the funda­mental meaning of re-ceptio must frighten him off, for itis in conflict with his free concept of the free choice. If theLord inflows, and man recipit, it then appears that theinflowing of the Lord is the all of all things, for the inflowing is the Lords; the good of love and of charity is the Lords; the truths of Doctrine and of faith with him out of the Word are the Lords; the ,ecipere is the Lords; and the conjunction is the Lords. To he in that is to "live a life following the Doctrine";this is the life which the rejecters reject. In this it is thatthe followers are soft as wax, and the rejeeters a lump oftallow. In this it is that the followers never take up (receive) any more and anything else, than what is trulya recipe,·e. We are taught that a perceptio, a perception, isthere where the external things correspond to the internaIand communicate. The follower does not live exeept out of
  12. 12. 14 ANTON ZELLINGhis perceptions, which are also receptions. To live a life following the Doctrine for him is ta keep the perceptionspure by having the external things, all of them, noneexcepted, continua.lly ordered from the Lord, following theinterna!. His care for this constitutes his life, his lifefollowing the Doctrine. It will appear ta the rejecter thatthis will cost quite sorne sacrifices, quite sorne "mortifi­cations" as the roman-catholics say. But this again is arguedfrom the propriurn, from an entirely different life thatknows ouly of fittings in. And now for the first time thetrue signification of applying appears: it is the LordsLife, regrasped, which applies itself to the Doctrine, thesame to the same from the same origin. To follow here isto wave *, the will from the Lord waves tagether with theunderstanding from the Lord, the man is in the love of thewisdom, in the blessedness of conjunction "which is calledthe celestial marriage". If we had known that man ofmiddling understanding, but who lived a life followingthe Commandments, and also a super-ingenious rejecter,would we have seell the great distinction? In what mayhave consisted the life of that middling man? In a quiet,hidden application, in having been faithful over little ­but this with a faithfulness, a confidence, so simple, pure,and great, that his life beside that of the rejecter wouldhave appeared as simple, saturnine, fearsome, self.contained,monotonous, cold, and dull. For, in general, said with thelips, the "shunning of sins as sins against the Lord", iseasily done; but if the kingdom of God is thought of asinside the man, and the Lord is not viewed as being abovethe proprium. in worldly aspect, but in the things that liewithin waitiug there for the 1ecipere, then not-sinningbecomes a, well nigh superhuman lifetask, crowned only inthe rarest instances. Then faithfulness is interrelated VithQeing-l!J,~rried ..- an~ is-fUTl of infinite conjugiaJ fear.None of those things possible with the rejecter are possiblewith the follower. They can speak together, but as two of * To follow in Dutch is volgen, and to wave is golven; thiscannot be rendered in English. (ED.) ** The Dutch word for being married, "getrouwd zijn",is from the same root as the word for faithfulness, "trouw";the full meaning of this sentence therefore cannot be renderedin English. (ED.)
  13. 13. TO LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE 15whom one hates the other. It is clear that the lejecterconceives of the evil things as sins against God in anentirely different way from the follower. For him whorejects the life following the Doctrine there is really nothingto be shunned. A life outside the life following the Doctrineis a life of the proprium, and the proprium fears only the loss of name and profit. The sins against the Lord which,in the evil things, the follower shuns, are insults committedagainst the life following the Doctrine, for he clea.rlyperceives that this "life following the Doctrine" is his nomore than is the Lords influx into it. This life is one offollowing the Life which is the Lord, as the Doctrine ofthe Church is following the infinite Divine Doctrine. Thefollower feels even into the body that the life followingthe Doctrine is unassailable, and for him the "thou shaltnot ..." is given an entirely new sense: in the life followingthe Doctrine he will not sin, for that life is as particularlyprotected by Providence as is the embryo in the womb ovelwhich we read that a particular Providence watches. Hecarnes a life in him which in appearance is his, which inappearance he must protect against evil things, but which isthe Lords and is led from the Lord, well disposed, prosperous,happy, because it is yielding willingly, altogether, andfully, as the secondary significations of following indicate."Against God" for him is against the influx of the Lordfrom the good of love and of charity, which influx thelejecter inverts and thus never regrasps, never applies, forhe has nothing to apply, having rejected the life followingthe Doctrine. What is rejecting the life other than goingdirect to the Father out of the proprium? There sinning"against God" loses its sense, for the proprium cannot dootherwise. For the lejecter the Commandments stand in theimperative, for the follower in a blessed negative futuretense. They promise him the state of the saints. The lejecter takes up what he may, where he may, the follower recipit what is the Lords with him. With thelejecter everything is dead and old, with the followereverything is living and new. In apparently the samethings the one finds death, the other life. How dead allwords and ideas become for those who reject life, and howliving and new for those who live a life following theDoctrine, perhaps nowhere so clearly appears as in the
  14. 14. ,~ 16 :NTüN ZELLING taking up and the fitting in of the expression "to read the Word holily, to have it holy" with the rejecters, and in the regrasping and the application thereof with the fol­ lowers. "To read the W ord holily" - let us be honest ­ for most people has become a commonplace, something so familial that their lips readily pronounce it as a matter of course without their giving it any particular thought. The rejecters will indignantly deny this, but the fol­ lowers will be sadly silent at that indignation with a feeling of shame akin to compassion. For, what else is it that is generally understood by to read holily and to have holy ("to have holy", sanctU1n habere, for the first time indeed enters into our language, as a lost and now 1egrasped word), than an exiernal attitude, an amalgamation of what is roman catholic solemn, protestant stiff, jewish traditional? Meanwhile holy is most closely related to "living a life following the Doctrine", The Latin words sanctus and saCe1 just as secundu-Yn come from sequor, and their sanscrit root sak means to follow, to honour. To read holily therefore means to read while following, to read with a life following the Doctrine, which must be something entirely different from the "holy" reading with a rejected life. Our Dutch heilig (holy) again is connccted with heel (whole) [old English halig and hall, thus with the Greek secondary meanings of "following": altogether and fully , For the rejecters the holy is only on the outside, for the followers entirely from within. Is it not overwhelming that in the word sanctus, holy, the following and the honouring lie enclosed, a following with the life that for the first time truly is an honouring? Now for the lejecter "to read holily" is a worn down type, for the follower an inexhaust­ ible word that begins to live in him more and more, within the radius of which light ever more real human things enter his Ide. The holy reading by thE: lejecter projects night­ birds only on the wall. For the lejecter everything is of importance, except that life over which the follower watches. Not to live a life following the Doctrine is the same as saying to the Lord: "We have Abraham for a father", for it means having things of doctrine and faith, but admitting no flowing in of the Lord and not being willing for any recipere. Recipere the Lord is to allow the Lord to give Eternal Life to the
  15. 15. TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE 17truths of Doctrine and of faith with man out of the W ord,and to make a dwelling therein. Just as the Lord cannot dwell with man except in what is His, just so man fromhimself cannot take up anything but the human. Nowrejecting life is nothing cIse than taking the receptionnaturally and effecting a fitting in, not knowing that thereceiving is a receptio, and that also the application isaltogether and fully the Lords. And, curiously enough, ofrejection the same may be said from the opposite, as ofregrasping. For if the receiving, re-cipere, thus seen, is awilling regrasping of that which man already has in himfrom the Lord, of that which from the Lord already is inman, over against that, rejecting, re-jicere, thus seen, is anunwilling throwing back of that which man should havein him from the Lord, of that which from the Lord shouldbe in man. This makes clear that it is the follower who hasand to whom will be given, and that it is the lejecter whohas not and from whom will be taken that what he fanciedhe possessed. Clear also that the lejecter not only does notlive a life following the Doctrine, but also persecutes andpursues it. By "living a life following the Doctrine" the larger andsmaller society will have to change completely. This hasalread,r been pointed out in speaking of "the interior dwel­ling" . For the interior dwelling is only there where alife is lived following the Dootrine; there only is an es­sential meeting, from place to place, and not only a pre­sence in aspect. For the sake and on behalf of that interiordwelling the exterior dwelling should be so cleansed andordered that it already fully answers the natural ideathat most people must have of the interior dwelling - theexterior dwelling also being interiorly seen, that is, not as adomicile but as civil decency and good manners, newlyinspired out of the life following the Doctrine; for thatlife must reform everything, literally everything, even taultimates and lowest things, into the smallest diversions,which thus also ... become purely the Lords. For if Pro­vidence watches over the smallest moment of life, thesmallest moment of life should be receptible, regraspable.This the rejector will be most fierce in opposing: "mine at $ Address by H. D. G. GROENEVELD, see above p. 17. 2
  16. 16. 18 .NTON ZELUNGleast the diversions". No, these tao will have at some timeta participate in the celestial blessedness, fully taken upinto, regrasped in a life fol1owing the Doctrine. One daythe state of the Chureh spontaneously applied will livinglymirror itself in the shLte of society and in the least, thevery least things thereof. J.1hen society will be a Man in the spirit, living aJone and safely in that spirit oflife that can truly be called "sphere", truly "sociable"; forthore are two kinds. Qf _so..ciablen~ss: this, and any other.For a time we must content ourselves with a multitudeof artificial fittings in, but we must not regard them assigns of progress, as signs of "life". The true life of theChurch is in the application from within, in the lifc ofevery one following the Doctrine, of an together and ofeach one, in the life from the Lord. The Church as Man andman as Church is the receptacle in which the Lord is inwhat is His, receptus, regrasped. That regrasping is theconjunction, the reconjunction, the Religion, the True livin.qChristian Religion. What is the importance and the use of a considerationsuch as this on life following the Doctrine? Hather mightone ask: what is the danger and the disadvantage? For inaIl things that touch the lite, whether direct or indirect,very ugly things come ta light, the uglier the more the loveof self and of the world within them have been sugar-coated.For, of course, we aIl of us have nothing of the lejecterand everything of thc follower. We aIl live a life followingthe Doctrine, be it in a greater or smaller measurc (as ifthere were a greater or smaller measure in living a life"following the Doctrine"). And thereby we vttlgarize theward "life following the Doctrine" ta a familiar term, ta acommonplace, as the words "ta read holily" or "interiordwelling"; thereby we henceforth take the ward into ourmouths easily and untouched, whille we ought ta enter in­ta this word full of silent awe, as soÏnething a thousandtimes greater than we. Whoever in the least begins tarea.Eze the meaning of "a life following the Doctrine", of"reading holily", overwhclmed and breathless, asks ofhimself: "Who then can be saved?" Upon which followsthe Lords answer: "Vith man this is not possible, butwith Gad alone". But we generally do Ilot let it get
  17. 17. 10 LiVE A LlFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE 19 so far, e content ourselves with passing off every thought coneerning a. "Iife following the Doctrine" as being nothing new, as something which from the beginning was overwell known to the members of the New Church and which we , can therefore hastily pass over. Instead of a living acquis­ ition, the word becomes just one more lifeless, hardened idea, and, however paradoxical it may sound, an accepted( rejec ted something, the charaeteristic of ail vulganzation; for vulgarizing is nothing else than depriving something of its living contents and making it common, thus rejecting( the contents and not accepting the form otherwise than deformed according to the proprium. Doing thus, the evil and taise in ourselves, t...h~u:ejecter in us, can make itse1f masterî of such words as reading holily, living a lifë-rülIowing the Doctrine, the interior dwelling, and fit them in according ta and for the sake of the form. There lie the danger and the disadvantage of ail misunderstood progress of Doctrine ­ ( the immediaie.- vulgarization, the forerunner of ail pro­, fanation and soon equàlly horrible. The danger and" tIîe disadvantage of form-alone, of ever more forms-alone. The damnable faith-alone consists of nothing but that. Tlie importance and the ·use, however, of every consideration of a life following the Doctrine are so preponderant for every weil undcrstood progress of Doctrine, that it finally learns to overlook the inevitable danger and disadvantage, remembering the words: "Let the dead bury the dead". The importance of every such testimony is: To ever more clearly understand that every progress of Doctrine is altogether and fully dependent on a li~ following the Doctrine. The use is every self-exammation enlightened by Doctrine and consequent repentance. For, as in a certain light of wisdom we see that the Lord is in the Doctrine of genuine truth, yea, that the Lord is that Doctrine, even so we learn with fear, in the measure in which from the Lord we turn ourselves to the love of that wisdom, to realize that the Lord is in the life following the Doctrine, yea that the Lord is that life. Our tender care then becomes serving that life in everything and not letting it go short 0-1 anything. And we get so far as to be able to see that Doctrine in the life following the DoctrLne is in its fulness, in its hoEiWSS, in its power. "T.,2 the Angels more than to any others the appearance is given
  18. 18. 20 ANTON ZELLING~iJ th~y lixed_oJLLQLthemselves with ineffable felicity",A.C. 1735. The greater the innocence, the greater theappearance. (The rejecter would sooner expect that the morewisdom a man possesses, the fewer appearances he is in).That appearance in other words is called the celestialProprium. Now to live a life following the Doctrine is tobUn an unassailable iiJ.noc~~ë from tli!) Lord, with thêble~se9-ness of the appearance of living as if from onesself increasing into the infinite. In short, ··Tivmg a fiEefollowing the Doctrine" is being gifted with the celestialProprium. For whêrë- else will tIiiscèlëStiârPropnumdWell than in what is the Lords with man and Angel,in the Church and in Heaven? Vhere else than in thelife following the Word? And so the Celestial Doctrineis not conceivable without this second like unto it: thecelestial life - "perfect, even as your Father, who is inthe Heavens, is perfect", Matth. V : 48.
  19. 19. DE HEMELSCHE LEEREXlRACT FROM THE ISSUE FOR APRIL 1935 ro LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING lHE DocrRINE El" ANTON ZELLING. "When therefare ye s/w-ll see the abomination of desolation, signifies the devastation of the Church.... Which was told of by Daniel the prophet, signifies ... everything prophetie eon­ cerning the Lords Advent and coneerning the state of the Chureh.... Standing in the holy place, signifies devastation as to aIl things whieh are of good and truth; the holy place is the state of love and faith.... LET HIM THAT READETH UNDER­ STAND, signifies that these things are to be weIl observed by those who are in the Church, especially by those who are in love and faith". A.C.3652. n ln another way: There are two thing-s: The life of the Doctrine, and thelife following the Doctrine. In "the life of the Doctrine",the Lord is the Doctrine; in "the life following theDoctrine", the Doctrine is the Neighbour. In essence thesame, but with a distinctive accent. Just as in Dutch thereare two words for "wheel", "rad" and "wiel" , meaning thesame, but with a distinction. In the word "rad" the stress ison the spokes - whence "molenrad" (mill-wheel); in theword "wiel" the stress is on the encompassing rim ­whence "vliegwiel" (fly-wheel). In the life of the Doctrinethe thought might be of a wheel of rays out of a goldensun-axis, in life following the Doctrine, of the will regardedas the circumference of the wheel. The life of the Doctrinegoes forth, the life following the Doctrine returns. Onlyin the unity of both is the VERA CHRISTIAN A RELIGIO,the Coming in the Second Coming, fulfilled. For the"Second Advent" - Adventus Secundus - might also beunderstood as "Following [according to] the Coming": thereis no taking up, no receptio, of the Lords Second Comingexcept following the taking up, the receptio, of each Coming
  20. 20. 22 ANTON ZELLINGof the Lord. A taking up, a "eceptio, in :ITill and under­standing, with the life, with the inmost of that life; theproprium. Vhat is the proprium? A question in which liesthe Lords question: "Peter, lovest thou Me?" and, like thatsad question, to be thrice repeated: Vhat is the proprium? The Latin ward praprit~1n is - But let it first be settledonce and for aIl, that it is the Doctrine which should shedits light upon the etymology, and not vice-versa. whichwould be an example of the imaginary physica.l influx.For, the Vord dwells in the ward in its own, spiritual outof a celestial origin. "Once a. flower was opened beforethe Angels as to its interiors, which are called spiritual,and when they saw they said that there was within as itwere a whole paradise, consisting of indescribable things",SACR. SCRIPT. FROM Exp. 19. rrhat flower is every wordopened out of the Vord, letter by letter as a botanicalwonder of sense in fOTIn; as a form a natural thing, as anatural thing an effect out of spiritual things, and thespiritual things the effects out of the celestial things. Thusseen, etymology too, becomes an ancilla Dact"inae, a hand·maid of the Doctrine, confirming what the word itself says:the etymas logos, that is, the tme, genuine, thus originalward, in short, the interior sense of the ward: "as it werea whole paradise consisting of indescribable things". -­Now the Latin ward propriurrt is i.n all probability con­tracted from pro-priva, that is, "for ones own" or "as onesown"; while privus is connected with our "vrij" (free); inwhich ward "-mif there are etymologically invol ved theideas of will, desire, dear, loved (whence the Dutch words"1)riend" and "vrijen" for "friend" and "ta woo"), tofavour, to make beautiful, analogous to the Latin for free,liber, of which the sanscrit-root lub-dhas means "desirous"(whence libido, voluptuousness). In the Dutch ,vord "heteigene" (the prapriurn, literally "the own") two intergrownideas can be indicated, that of ta possess and that of ta awe(still clearly traceable in the English: ta own and ta awe).Surrounded by the clear and warm light of the Doctrinewe now see the word propriurn, "the own", spring open likea flower-bud: that which man possesses for or as his own,free according to his will, wish, and desire; but whichnevertheless he owes and remains owing to the Lord. That
  21. 21. 10 LIVE A LIFE FOLLOW[NG THE nOCTRINE TI 23pro in p,o-p"iztm, for or as, signifies the appearance as ifit were mans, just as in the word ozon the appearance ofthe self-possession constitutes the external of that word,and the essence of the indebtedness the internal. Etymolo­gically, that is, taken as to the true sense of the word, theproprium means: That which in appearance is mans, butin essence the Lords. We now in this etymology enlightenedby the Doctrine clearly sec 1WO propriums designatingthemselves, which may be called the "indebted proprium"and the "possessive proprium"; the one being of Heaven,the other of hello Wherever in the W ord Heaven and hellare mentioned, Heaven refers to the proprium in manindebted to the Lord, and hell to mans possessive proprium;Heaven to the innocence in him, hell to his guilt; for toacknowledge indebtedness is from the Innocence of theLord to appropria te to ones self, to be in the innocenceof Heaven; but the denying of the indebtedness is thedisowning in the proprium of the Innocence of the Lord,and therefore to be in guilt, in the guilt and indebtednessof hell. From the letter of the Word we have learned to seewith a rational that mans proprium "from birth is nothingbut evil and false", but to see with a rational is by nomeans yet to perceive with the voluntary. The LordsComing had for its end the subjugation of the heIls andthe ordering of the Heavens. Without these two Vorksof Divine Mercy the Second Coming would not be con­ceivable, for the Second Coming is following the Coming.With refercncc to man the Coming of the Lord is a sub­jugation of the possessive proprium and an ordering of theindebted proprium. For as long as the possessive propriumfrom its hells rises up against the indebted proprium inits Heavens, this latter is under constraint and out of itsorder. In the six days or periods of the story of creation,the states of mans regeneration following one another,have been described, and the second state, the statussecundus is "when a distinction is being made between thethings which are of the Lord, and those which are properto man", A. C. 8, which state is followed by the repentanceof the third state. The things that are the Lords in theW ord are called remains, reliquiae in the Latin, literally:
  22. 22. 24 ANTON ZELLINGthings left back, things which remain behind. Undoubt­edly, mans own things make his possessive proprium;the Lords things, left behind in him as reliq-uiae the pro­prium indebted to the Lord: and in the ARCANA COELESTIA,n. 13, we read that in the regeneration out of this indebtedown, the greatel part, at this day, come only to the firststate; "sorne only to the second; sorne to the third, fourth,fifth; seldom to the sixth; and scarcely any one to theseventh". What then is, be it asked once more, the proprium?Vhat do Petel"s tears signify at the thrice repeatedquestion: Lovest thou Me? In a sense "ve might even speak of three propriums: , 1. the proprium in itself, which is purely the Lords,and which in man II. either shines forth as the indebted, or III. hides away hëllind the possessive. This would make clear that the Lord does not break orextinguish our evil and false things, but bends them. For,just as the evil and false is a perverted good and true, thepossessive is the indebted of the sarne proprium perverted.Reformation and regeneration have no other meaningthan turning the Lords proprium in man from the posses­sive to the indebted, which is 8uch an enormous work thatwe read that at this day scarcely any one leaches theseventh state, and further that the work of regenerationeven in the highest Heavens is not completed into eternity.This at the same time gives an image of the most direfllltemptations the Lord went throllgh in the complete glori­fication of Ris Ruman, and we read in D.L.W. n. 221:"That the Lord came into the world, andtook upon Himself(~us-ceperit, not receperitf) the Ruman, in orderto putHimself îilto the power of subjug:;Lting the hells, and ofreducing (red-igendi) ~ll things ta arder both in theHeavens and in the lands. This Ruman Re put on overRis former Ruman. The Ruman which Re put on in theworld, was as the Ruman of a man in the world, yet bothDivine, and thence infinitely transcending the finitehumans of Angels and men". His former Human is theRuman Divine Proprium of the Father Rimself, the Hmnanof man is the indebted Divine Ruman Proprium of the Son;and the possessive human proprium is the maternaI from
  23. 23. TO LlVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE II 25Mary which the Lord put off entirely. Thus seen, the LordsGlorification is the conjunction of the Lords Propriums, oÏwhich the regeneration of the proprium in man is an image. Tt is following the progress of the Doctrine that thisquestion of life arises, for jf the Doctrine is not immediatelyfollowed by a life fol1owing the Doctrine, the life of theDoctrine remains spiritual, outside the body of the Church,it draws back, and its after-effects are cerebral only. It is acompel1ing necessity out of the Doctrine to see those twopropriums in arder that the infernal one may be subjugatedand that which is the Lords be put in arder and becomecelestial - from the Lord. No Second Coming but followingthis Coming. Mans proprium is entirely evil and faise, Jnverselyit might be said that the evil and the false is mansproprium, for therein it is as in its subject. lhat shunningevils means shunning the possessive proprium, taken merelydoctrinal1y, in a purely abstract way, is quite clear; butbetween the possessive proprium and the indebted proprium,if no Coming of the Lord is admitted, without subjugationon the one side and a putting in order on the other, in aword, without separation, a mixing up is possible of goodand evil, true and false; first a rendering vague of theborders, then a vulgarization, and final1y a profanation.For what is the Lords and what is mans, what is inherentin the indebted proprium and what is inherent in the pos-sessive proprium, are continual1y opposed the one to theother, and if we do not continually allow the Lord tawrestle in our temptations and to conquer, if we do notimmediately obey His command: Follow Me, and have thisfollowed by the second command: Let the dead bury thedead, Matth. VIII: 22, the possessive proprium has themastery over the indebted proprium: the tears of Peter. The evil and false of the possessive proprium is theperverted good and true of the indebted proprium, andbecause in that perversion are contained its will, wish,desire, favouring, and beautifying, the }lossessive propriummakes its evif and false appear as good and true to suchan extent that it lets its evil and faise pass among thegood and true of the indebted proprium as if they were alike,as false prophets coming in sheeps clothing, but inwardIy
  24. 24. 26 .NTON ZELLTNGthey are ravelling wolves, Matth. VII : 15. So it happonsthat we in ourselves, al one and in society, and in others inthe church and the world, find so many things that arcgood, lovable, precious, hearty, varm, spontaneous, delight­fuI, noble, great, true, pretty, beautiful, agreeable, spirited,fine and what not, and nevertheless they are such onlyas to the appearance of the possessive proprium. Does not thepassage in RATIO",L PSYCHOLOGY, XXXI refer to this:"[It appears] that insanity is wisdom, fallacy truth, thebecoming and the unbecoming honesty, vice virtue; licensefree choice, pleasures and the allurements of the senses thchighest felicity and the highest good. lhat art appearsmore ingenious than nature; that philosophers are possessedof a better common sense than the plebeians; that they arcwise who talk more elegantly and are skilled in languagesf1nd mingle their sharper wittiness, or they who keep silentor bring forth haH the sense of what is to be understood;that we are to esteem those who are esteemed by otherswhom we believe to be possessed of judgment; infiniteother things occur in the disquisition of the tnte and thelalse, the good and the evil, the bea-utiful and the becoming.The discriminations themselves, which do not appear beforethe senses, we believe to be naught so long as they areconcealed, although they are infini te, and the figure rathergross and unequal. So in other things". vVe put in italics:"in the disqtt.isition", perceiving that what is meant is anexamination guided from the Lord, starting from love forthe truth for the sake of truth; for the appearances therementioned are just those of which the possessive propriumcertainly nover tolerates any examination, or only afalsified one. But let us give a striking example of a subjugated pos­sessive proprium and of a well-ordered indebted proprium. In the so-called JOURNAL OF DREAMs, n. 76, 77,Emanuel Swedenborg wrote: "1 heard a person at the tableasking his neighbour the question whether any one whohad an abundance of money could be melancholic. l smiledin my mind and would have answered, if it had beenproper for me to do so in that company, or if the questionhad been addressed to me, that a person who possesseseverything in abundance, is not only subject to melancholy,but is [exposed] to a still higher kind, that of the mind and
  25. 25. TU LTVE , LlFE FOLLOWlNG TIlE nOCTRINE TI 27the soul, or of the spirit which operates therein, and 1wondered that he had proposed such a question. l cantestify ta this sa much the more, as by the grace of Gadthere has been bestowed upon me in abundance everythingthat l require in respect ta temporal thing-s; l am able talive richly on my incarne alone, and can carry out what lhave in mind, and still have a surplus of the revenue, andthus l can testify that the sorrow or melancholy whichcornes from the want of the necessaries of life, is of a lesserdegree and merely of the body, and is not equal ta the otherkind. lhe power of the Spirit prevails in the latter, but Tdo not know whether it is sa also in the first kind, for itseems that it may be severe on bodily grounds; still, "[ willnot enter further into this matter". Leaving for a moment out of consideration the subject oftbis meditation, wc would wish to draw attention taSwedenborgs attitude, expressed in the words: "l smiledin my mind and wonld have answered, if it had been properfor me to do so in that society, or if the question had beenaddressed to me". Externally taken, a courteous attitudewhich every "perfect gentleman" would likewise have ob­served; one does not speak when one has not been introduced.Interiorly taken, however, it is the attitude of life of ahumbled indebted proprium and of a subjugated possessiveproprium. For how many of us would not have eagerlytaken the opportunity quickly found at a table dhôte tohold a striking speech, even if for a quarter of an houronly, for the sake of reading from the eyes of all "0 HOWJUST,O HOW LEARNED, 0 HOW WISE", l.C.R. 332, 333, 334.It would have seemed ta us as if we had spoken from a goodand true impulse, and had spoken the right ward, and still­and still this would have been an appearance out of the pos­sessive proprium, proud of our own pedantry and the demon­stration thereof. And our feeling of self would have feltflattered with the satisfaction of baving done a good work,ta have stood for the truth, ta havc sown a little seed, andwhat not more. Here we have a striking example of howthe possessive proprium may pose as good and true, with thetruths from the indebted proprium and, liot being sub­jugated, push forward, presumptuously occupying the placeof the indebted proprium which has been put out of its arder,and not be conscious of how evil and false it is! This now
  26. 26. 28 ANTON ZELLINGis one of the many fonus in which the possessive propriumacts as disturber, as lejecter, as fitter-in, loving the upper­most rooms, the chief sea,ts, the greetings, altogether asin the description of Matthew ch. XXIII. And now, as acontrast, notice the attitude printed above in italics, at thesame time bearing in mind the so highly characteristicsubject: whether possession makes melancholy! What anindebted proprium applied to life speaks therefrom, andwhat a subjugated possessive proprium; and yet, he whoreads this Journal of Dreams sees what combats had to behumbly wrestled through from the Lord and to be suffered,to keep this possessive proprium subjugated, in order thatin this life there might be the life following the Doctrine. The proprium, whatever it is, is the Lords, but it is givento man, Angel, and devil as his: pro privato, for or as privateproperty. Now the delight that constitutes the inmostof this appearance, in the indebted proprium is an inexpres­sibly blessed feeling of gratitude; and, in the possessiveproprium an excessive avidity and love of dominion. Vhetherpossession makes melancholy, it was asked. Is this melan­choly not involved in the sadness spoken of in MatthewXIX : 22: "When the young man heard that saying, hewent away sorrowful: for he had great possessions". In thetestimony which Swedenborg gave in the above quoted medi­tation we also see aIl of the great material possessions heenjoyed, expressly booked as a debit-item; and because helived entirely out of the indebted proprium he was silentat that table, because it was no society. We think also ofthat memorable meeting in T.C.R. n. 503 : "No presidentwas appointed ... but each one, as the desire seized him,rushed forth into the midst, and ... made public his opinion". (How characteristic too that every one there was seated at hisown small altar. And their speaking testified to a thinkingclose to the speech). This keeping silent now was fromthe indebted proprium, for the possessive proprium cannotkeep quiet, it must be active, of itself it must be able toshoot to the centre and to cry out, whether there is a society or not. Do we see the difference between the chaste andscrupulous indebted proprium and the unchaste and unscru­pulous possessive proprium? Do we also see therefrom howIDuch the lejecter in us transfers frOID the indebtecl to thepossessive, not perceiving that thereby he transfers the living
  27. 27. TO LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWING TUE DOCTRINE II 29contents as forms-alone, as mere cognitions, mere cultures. This concrete example is weighty with conclusions for us to draw. With a lip-confession of an evil and false pro­ prium we too easily shirk a life following the Doctrine. Inour life in the Church, alone and in company, we should let the possessive proprium be subjugated and the indebted proprium be ordered from the Lord, more and more, throughall the seven states, not for our own sake but for the sakeof the Lord. We should be near to one another in the indebtedproprium, and remain at a distance in the_ possessive pro­prium. The-reJeëteïrnlîs:<lntlîëcontrary, wishes usJQj>enem to one another in the possessive propriûm and at adistance in the indebteâproprium. Thus -our societies arestill full of good and true, dear and cordial, warm andgenerous, spontaneous and enthusiastic appearances, whichinteriorly are notping but evil and false, and meanwlùlêthëLord over and again asks01 the tliiïigs in our indebtedproprium: Peter, lovest thou Me? What in our lives in the face of the life following theDoctrine we ought to learn, is continually to appoint to itsplace in the lower earth the possessive propriqm, where itcould execute mean services for a piece of food, a piece oflaiment, and a piece of money; entirely as in the )ellishworkhouses. It is of the possessive proprium that the Lôrdsays: "For if ye love them which love you, what rewardhave ye? Do not even the publicans the same? And if yesalute your brethren only, vhat do ye more than others?Do not even the publicans so?" Matth. V: 46,47. Our pos­sessive proprium in its way loves cordially and is full ofthe most affectionate greetings. It is even willingly preparedto embrace the Doctrine and to be taught by it. It is willingto improve its life proyid~d ::- it only. does not, nay not 10anything, 10se that life. It is with this as wlth the love ofdominian: a great love of dominion cannot but be accom­panied by a great shrewdness, and it is part of that shrewd­ness never to show a trace of its love of dominion; it beauti­fies. it in the shape. of~ Ideal- the doctrine otall tyra_nE~cworld-reformers. To carry through tb..?:ttdeal iS,nothing butto fit into everything the ambition and love of dominion:the danger of an indoctrinated proprium. What we thereforegreatly need is a concrete idea in oîtrselves of the propriums,what they have been in the Most Ancient Church, in 1he
  28. 28. 30 .·NTOJ ZELLING Ancient Church, in the Hebrew, Jewish, primitive Chris­ tian, and ~w they_will have_to be in the:tJ~~ Ç!!..~,h. And just as the Ancient Church had completely elaborated Doctrines of Charity, wc shaH also be given the indebted possession of siÏnilar Doctrines; and, however curious it sounds, amongst them tbere will he also a Doctrine of Society, treating of the subjugation a.~d the ord~ring of the respective propriums, to such an extent that i.n the state of any arbitrary society the state of the Church will be mirrored-artôgetJi.er and fully. To this end it is necëSsary that every society, and in every society every individual, to use a mathematical expression, should find its greatest QQmmon measure and its least com~on mulj;iple;])erceiving that aIl that goes beyond that is from evil. In the multiple is the life of the Doctrine, in the measure the life following the Doctrine, both organically one. Therein there is no place for the possessive proprium except at the outermost peri­ phery, and even then as it were at lest, that is, put to its "own" mean service. It is not enough with the lips to abhor "the proprium" and meanwhile to leave it its evil and false playground; it were indeed better ta ex tend mercy also ta that proprium and to perform for it a good work of charity, as for a stray dog. The possessive proprium is such a stray dog if it is not subjugated. Once subjugated, it may bec;~e a good watch- or draught-dog, entitled to "good treahnent" in its kennel; outside, not in the hou§c. The false prophets against which the Lord warns proceed from thep~~.ê.~.§iye propriurn and present thernselves as the indebted proprium. Our entire life following the Doctrine must guard against this under penalty of losing for ever the life of the Doc­ trine in us. Our Church is the Church of the Lords Second Comi!lg. A.nd promising this Second Coming following Ris ·Coniing, the Lord sadly asked: TVhen the Son of Man cometh, shall He find Faith on the em·th? Let us then, more and more each day, as from oursolves, take up the Life of the Doctrine with and in a life following the Doctrine, lest at sorne time we walk, our head high above in an appearance of doctrine, the frayed hem of our galment dragging thlough a filthy Jelusalem; 1 which will happen if we leave it ta our possessive propliumil ta fleely dispose of the things of Doctrine. And the end of it would be that we, as they of the filthy Jerusalem, disap­1l
  29. 29. TU LIVE . LlFE FOLLOWING THE /)OCTRINE [l 31pointed everywhere and yet indefatigably, Vould be seekingfor the Uessiah, thus together with the Second Coming. als.9making void the Coming. For the possessive llropriumfinally chokes up even every general influx. vVe read "that mans understanding can he raiscd abovehis propeT love inta some light of wisdom in the love ofwhich he is Ilot". Vell then, if hy that light he docs notsee and is not taught "how he must live if he would camoalso into that love, and thus enjoy blessedness into theeternal", D.L.V. 395, it is with his possessive propriumalone that he enjoys the things of wisdom. His reward i8gone, his reward and his use. He may have his moments ofillUminatio (from lumen, glimmer) - in ordinary languageit is said "luminous ideas" - but the true illustraNo (fromltx, light) is never given to him. vVe are taught that theDoctrine is from those who areilLfnlightenment; this means:fr2m t~o~ wh_o are in the light of wisdom with the love ofthat wisdom. FUrther it imperatively means that nothing ofDoctrine ever is from those who "are above their proper lovein sorne light of wisdom". He who is in the love of wisdom,has the life of the Doctrine iu the lue following the Doc­trine, dweUing in an indebtedand thus innocent proprium:he perceives arcana, while the other is only solving IJlOblerns,with a continuaUy consulted rational. AU discussions indoctrinal matters that cannat he settled have therefore thiscause, either that both parties speak out of "a certain light",or that one is in enlightenment, and the other only in "a cer­tain light"; the former in a life foUowing the Doctrine, thelatter outside of it. That it is necessary that there shouldbe also the latter, is a different question; but what here andnow is the principal thing is that we may no longer at anypriee leave the indebted and the possessive proprium for whatit is, undistinguished as one dark entangled mass with"nothing but evil and false". First of aU, we do not leaveit fol what it is, fol the possessive proprium everywhereand always still plays its tricks on us fa.r tao freely; andsecondly, in that way we ncver learn ta see that the Doc­trine most certainly is in-generated in the proprium, butin the indebted proprium. How otherwise could it be under­stood that the Most Ancients had the Ward engraved in theirhem·ts? And one more question: The judgments in the
  30. 30. 1 32 ANTON ZELLING 1 Apocalypse on the Angels of the Churches, do they concern· the Doctrine or the life following the Doctrine? The answeI is clear: ~oes violence to the life follQwing the Doctrine, does violence to the life of the Doctrine. WI-IOSO READETH, LET HlM UNDERSTAND. Taking the Word for the Doctrine of the Church is ta. enlarge and extenûthe possessivepropiiiimta a rich m~ land; "... but God said unto him, Thou fool, this night thy soul shall be required of thee: then whose shall those things be, which thou hast provided"? Luke XII : 16-21. But out of the W ord to receive (recipere) the Doctrine ofi1! the Church as the understanding of the W ord, is from the ~ord to have the indebted proprium made arigelic and a celestial proprium. The life of the Doctrine in the life following the Doctrine - " 1 the Vine, you the branches" - is the GLORI­ FICATION heard in Heaven, T.C.R. 625. The six days or periods of the story of creation as the six successive states of mans regeneration have in them- ll"o otner end than fo èàme to the Glorification of that Seventh Day. Who, in this connection, re-reads the ARCANA COELESTIA, n. 6-13, will find that the advance of Regeneration is no other than that from - the from ones self to the as if from ones self, a gradually stronger shining forth of the indebted proprium through the possessive proprium, until the former is made altogether angelic, the latter definitely asleep. Then love reigns. And so the "question what is the lifUi>k.wing the I?~i~e, is no other than the Lords question: Peter, lovest thou Me?
  31. 31. L
  32. 32. nDE HEMELSCHE LEEREXTRACTS FROM THE ISSUE FOR AUGUST 1935lO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING rHE nOCTRINE BY ANTON ZELLJNG. III "There are also the theoretical things of the truth of faith, and there are the practical ones; he who regards the theor­ etical for the sake of thé practical, anù who sees the former in the latter, and thus from both conjoined the good use of life, and j.§. l!:ffecte.!! by boJh foX thé sake of this end, he is in faifllfrom theLorël". A. C. 9297. lhe theoretical refers ta the intel1ectual, theory beingderived froïiï11ïemein: to regard, to see, to understand, butalso: to assist at a festival; and indeed, for in such astateis the intellectual mind, when, withdrawn from worldlyand earthly things, it is lost in the contemplation of thecelestial and spiritual things concerning the Glorificationand the Regeneration. The praet.ical refers to the voluntary, practice beingderived from.pmssein: to do, to act, to fulfil, to attain, toacquire, to have in view. In ancient. times action and willwerc one, and consequently the good practical is so entirelyand cornpletely following the true theoretical that the Greekverb prassein besides to execute, ta peIfOlm , to work, andto intend, also means to walk, to go, ta pass through, totravel a· road, to succeed; thus here in other words: withgood results to fol1ow the way of the theoretically true. In thc highcst sense the practical fOllOWS the theoreticalas Regeneration is following the Glorification; for to followis to be sa conjoined with the Lord as the Lord in respectof the Ruman Essence is conjoined with J ehovah - "thisal one is to follow Him" , A. C, 1737. And to be conjoinedwith the Lord is to be conjoined with Him in the internaIunderstanding of the W ord. The word verstand [under­standing] indicates a· marriage, the marriage of the rational
  33. 33. 38 :NTON ZELLINGand the free, both in the understanding having come to astand, to a position, to an attitude and a relation; forvelstand[understanding] means to have come to a stand or to astanding; and that verstand [understanding] in essence is astate of houding and verhouding [attitude and relation] isproved by the Duteh word ve1standhouding [to be ongood "understanding" with sorne one], being virtually ata utology, (: In the relative sense the practical 1S following the theor­etical, as the trnths of life are following the truths offaith, and in that respect the Prologue to the CANONS OFTHE NEW CHURCH concludes with this trumpet-blast fullof judgment: "In the degree in which the truths of lifebecome of life, in that degree the truths of faUh become offaith, and not the least more or less", AND NOT THE LEAST MORE OR LESS. Out of this word,as a Cherub covering the CANONS with his wings, it standsforth hard as a rock, not only that the Doctrine of genuincTruth cannot exist without a life following it, but also thatno life which is "more or less" according to Doctrine canexist. For this not the least fnme or less means: Just as inthe Lord there is not more of Love than of Wisdom, andnot more of Wisdom than of Love, and any excess wouldperish, just so in man there should be not more of doctrinethan of life, and not more of life than of doctrine, foranything which herein exceeds an equal measure, is fromevil. This not the least more 01 less also enables us toperceive why the Sun of the spiritual worId appears at amedium height; also to perceive the ancient wisdom thathas come down to us in the saying "the golden mean" ,y ea, it enables us also to understand what interiorIy ismeant by his being a man of rniddling understanding, inthat Memorable Relation concerning a man who, havinglived following the Decalogue, became equal to the highestAngels in wisdom, namely that in this understandingaIl things kept a pure mean, where nothing strove toexcel above the lest or above another, thus to be themost, the first, the greatest, In one word: this not the least * Here and in several other places of this and the previousarticles by Ml. Zelling there occur passages of an etymologicalnature of great interest, which it is, of course, not possible torender in a direct translation. (ED.).
  34. 34. TO LIVE , LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE III 39more 01 less unfolds the internaI sense of the Lords words:"He that is least among you aIl, the same shall be great" ,Luke IX : 48; for the least is he in whom nothing excelsfor the sake of himself and the world at the expense of theLord and the neighbour; thus with whom aIl things havebeen put in arder from the only Lord out of His InfiniteMercy which that man, as the least, with the deepesthumiliation acknowledges most of aIl. Tt is of awful significancc that the CANONS, the 1ulesof conduct, OF THE NEW CHUR CH are immediately precededby this "not the least more or less" - as if this word,a. double-edged sword, served as a measuring-rod in set­ting out the rigid lOIes of conduct. The Lord has not beenglorified mme 01 less, and mans regelleration is not m01e01 less an image of the Lords Glorification, Blasphemousas it would be to say sa, it will to the same extent obscureaIl meaning not to accept the life following the Doctrineentirely and fully with the whole heart, with the wholesoul, and with the whole understanding. As a proof thefol1owing quota.tions from the CANONS, The Lord 8aviou1,VI : 3 and 8, may serve: N. 3: "The Lord, when He was in a state of exaninition,or of humiliation, prayed to the Father as though absentor remote; and when He was in a state of glorification, orunitioll, He spoke with Himself, when with the Father;ALTOGETHER as with man thme are states of the soul andbody, bef01e and aftm 1egenmation", N. 8: [After the Lords temptation separately in theDivine Truth has been spoken of, and His inassailabilityin the Divine Good when conjoined] "The same takes placewith the man who is regenerated f101n the Lmd", In the case of aIl those with whom the truths of lifehave not come to belong to the life, bath truths ita.licizedabove must belong to the scientifics and not to faith;what then with them may properly belong ta the livingfaith? For it has there been openly announced: Nowhere butin the very life of following (ta be regenerated is ta allowof being regenerated, and to aIlow is to foUow), can theLurds Glorification be perceived and experienced in life;the perception of the truths of faith having become faithfrom the experience in life of the truths of life havingbecome life. Perception in the experience in life, the
  35. 35. 40 ANTON ZELLINGtheoretical in the practical, behold here the Regenerationin its victorious advance, in its prassein. Before treating further of "truths of life", let us firstmore closely consider the word "to follow", out of theW ord and out of the language. Out 01 the language. TheScience of Correspondences in ancient times wa.s the scienceof sciences. Let us understand well that Hebrew superlative:not the uppermost science, but the inmost, the science whichis the foundation of, and the one ruling in all the others,the first and the last, their centre and circumference, thatwhich made each science ha.vecommunion with all the others.The future doctrinal etymology will be rooted in thatrebom Science of Correspondences, and therein in its wayagain be a science of sciences, a linguistic anatomy, astro­nomy, botany, chemistry, and so forth; and in the smallesttittle or jot it will see, acknowledge, and jubilantly bringforward in confirmation, an imagc of the Unity and Infinityof God. On a word as "to folIo"," it could write a volumeas fascinating as voluminous, demonstrating that there arctwo hemispheres in thc language and therein two mightyconstellations, with WIL [will] for the one centre fromwhich springs forth the all of language, and with ZIJN [to be] for the other centre around which the all oflanguage revolves; demonstrating also how from the magieletter cornbination zn words shine forth as Zijn [to be 1.Zon [sunJ, Zoon [sonJ, Zin [senseJ, Zien [to see], Zenden[to send]; and how from the magic letter combinations wl,vl, fl, bl, pl, and these inverted to lw, lv, lf, lb, lp, wordsflow forth aIl having r<~lation ta the will, such as wil [willl,wiel [wheel], wel [wellJ, weelde [wealthJ, beeld [image],vleesch [flesh], vol [full], veel [muchJ, val [fallJ, bloei [bloomJ, plooi [pleat], allid. also such words as leven [life],liefde [loveJ, lijl [body], geloof [faith, belief], loven [to praise]. Demonstrating then how the word volgen [tofollow] and its anagram golven [ta wave] flow throughboth hemispheres and enter inta the most wonderfuI com­binations. To take up a word such as volgen nta follow] isto stir up the universal firmament of the language and tocome from one grand constellation of words to the other.Take as Rn example a simple combination of words such as volgorde [order of following, that is, sequence]: orde [order]
  36. 36. TO LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE III 41is derived from the sanskrit ar, that is, to go, to strive upward,whence orior, that is, to rise, ariens, the east, the morning,and in the highest sense the Lord who is arder itse1f; involgorde [arder of followingJ tha.t arder is bound, fusedinto, manied, with ta follow sa that the one part has becomefully the other and of the other, for ta follow is nothingbut following the arder, according ta arder; and arderis nothing but a regular following up, This and a thousandother things the ward to follow does in its waving throughthe entire language and through aIl languages, and suchbecause it is full of the volunta.ry; and because it isfull of the voluntary, of every voluntary, it constantlychanges its shape and suddenly and unexpectedly tums upin quite different wards, Just as it fills that ward or derYith its life, it draws a sense from homen [ta hear] andgehoafzœmen [ta obeyJ, and makes vol,qzaarn [obsequiousJrender a similar sense as gehoolzarnen [to obeyJ, Latinobsequm, We have previously seen how in heilig [holyJ theidea of volgen [tD followJllies involved; weIl then, in lezcn[to read] this concept ris equally involved, for the Latin,among other things, ascribes these senses ta legere [ta read]:ta follow, ta walk along, ta rUll through, a road; to skim,shear, sail over and along a thing; to gather together, tDglean, to roll up, ta wind up, to overtake, to catch up, tomuster, ta select, ta choose, ta seek out, ta eavesdrop, yea,even to steal, (whence sacTilegus) , From this it appearsthat also lezen [to read] is full of the voluntary and thusof what follows, so that "ta read holily" really means "tafollow in the spirit of followi.ng", that is ta take up theVord in will and understanding, For there is also a fol­lowing with one of the two, and thus Vith neither, that is,with an evil will and a false understanding; for whichrcason in Latin there are various words for followers andpartisans, such as sectatm and assecla, which aU indicate ashade of following, To consider the ward "ta follo"," out of the Word is taconsider the end of Creation, from the first thereof, being"man in Our image, following Our likeness" ta the lastthereof, being "an angelic Heaven out of the human race",For Heaven is nothing but an angelic society; and society- with which we have now approached ta the core of ourstudy - is nothing but a royal following, For the Latin
  37. 37. 42 .NTüN ZELLINGfor society is societas, of which the root soc is also derivedfrom sequor and means ta follow. And that need not evengreatly surprise us, for even our Dutch vergezellen [toaccompany, ta associate] means ta go along with a person.to follow him, and also to share, to be accompanied by andrelated with, to take part; and even our Dutch word geziu [family] once signified travelling-company, retinue, royalcourt, surrounding, armed escort; and gesinde [servants lknights train, courtiers, attendants, 8ocietas, a society, isnot merely an incidental multitude of people, but, as the rootinelicates, a multitude conjoined for an end which is generallyfollowed; hence in ancient times socius could also mean hus­band, just as in Dut{lh levensgezellin signifies wife. In thewodd, which does not know the ward out of the Word, asociety is never much more than an incidental mass of peopleerowded together for some jointly desired advantage; butin the New Church which, out of the Ward, takes up aneweach word, the celestial sense of following should be givenagain to that word, a following of noblemen who come tocot~rt, that is, serve God. And the court is often mentionedin the Worel, mostly, as in D.P. 113, in the sense of "thecourt of the ruling love", and there moreover followeel bythis awful worel: "As is the king such are the ministersand the satellites". All language and the -Vord, are ülterwavecl with "to fol­low". 8ecundum, following, in the Vvord oœurs almost asoften as the equivalent and in the Old Testamcnt connectingverse ta verse. And can it be otherwise? No effect exceptfollowing the cause, nothing that is later except followingthe prior, no state except following love anel wisdom,no nobility except following the King, no Church exceptfollowing the Doctrine, no image except following thelikeness. In Davids words: "Commit thy way untoJ"ehovah", Psalm XXXVII: 5, there is only one exhortation:Let us become following-Thee. We people sometimes speakabout "our path of life"" but that is then a swollen tenuof grandiloqucnce, for what at most is OU1S, is the pathstraight down ta hell; of a path of life we can only speakif the path of mans free choice has been turned to the wayof the Lord, if that path has allowed itself ta be drawn intothe CUITent of the Lords way, and follows along and after. Tt may therefore rightly be saiel that the word "to follow"
  38. 38. TO LIVE . LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE lU 43follows us everywhere. The language is ftûl of it, and in theVord there is no page, no line, where it does not occur.Let us call to mind the conclusion of the prologue to theRATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: "Therefore, benevolous reader, ifyou will deign ta follow me thus far, l believe that you willapperceive what is the souI. ... l would have wished thatmy companions should not abandon me midway". A harmon­ions series of shades of "following" may here be noticed:benevolous, to read, to follow, ta accompany, and how allof this directs itself to the voluntary, the voluntary in manas humanity, as the human race, ashumanandangelicsociety.It is out of the voluntary tha.t the society is a following[a court], and not until we learn weIl to see and to designatesociety as a following [a royal court], can we realize whata society must be and shall becom~, what it is not and whatit may not remain. Not until then can we perceive that thesocieties of Heaven are one from good; and that if HeavenwJere distinguished following the true things of faith, and notfollowing good, there would be no Heaven, because therowould be nothing of unanimity. (A.C. 4837). Indeed, a dis­tinction as ta the true things of faith Vould make parties ofthe societies. And now while here considering the society, bycontrasting the words "party" and "[a royal] followillg·.we come ta see the significance of the truths of life. If wetake society as it is taken in the world, thus as a party, thenthe truths of life and life itself stand altogether outside of it.If, on the other hand, we take society in the internai senseas it is in Heaven and should be in the Church, thus as aroyal following, the living connection between the truths oflife and the truths of faith shines forth as a golden girdlcnamed "Not the least more or less". The truths of life. Lifetaken in this connection is the cornpound of aIl tendencics andaffections going forth from the voluntary; the truths of lifeare those true things which continually erect and put intoorder all these tendellcies and affections; that they mustcome ta belong ta the life signifies that the voluntary mustbe willing, must be willing to listen, must be willing for thecleansing and purification of its tendencies and affections,ready for the ellnobling of the court of its ruling love. ThosetTuths of life in a sense very much resemble hygienic andeconomic regulatiolls; in essence thcir purpose is for a soundspirit ta maintain a sound body. "For as much as the truths
  39. 39. 44 ANTON ZELLINGof life come to belong ta life" means that in so much asman aUows "that the influx from Gad who is in the midstof the theologieal subjects which oceupy the highest regionof the human mind, operates into each and every thing belowas from a sun, so that speech and the cognition of Himpervades and fills aU those things", CANONS, God, SummaryX, Marginal Note. From this it is elea1 that not the takingup of the truths of faith is to follow Hint, but the taking;up in life of the truths of life, in such a way that a constantnew volunta,ry forms a consta.nt new body f01theintellectual,whereupon the truths of faith are then essentially of faithand not of science. ra come tn belong ta life" is ta come tobelong ta the Lord, and "ta come ta belong ta faith" isIikewise ta come ta belong ta the Lord: and when bath havebœome the Lords Itot the least mare or less, it may appearthat those truths of life are similar, if not the sa me as thetruths of faith, differing only as ta the receptacles. Thequestion no is: how does man as a family and as a societyof the Chureh stand before the practical things of the truth offaith, before the truths of life; how does society stand beforethe voluntary and how can it make that into a dwelling­place of the Lords charity, as also the intellectual into adwelling-place of the Lords faith? Put in another way:,,,,hat and where is the life of the Church and how are manand society ta be that they may be a vessel of life? Life is truly life only when it leads to Heaven. Howevel,without the acknowledgment of self and the cognitions oftrue and good no one can be led tn Heaven. (A.C. 189). Nowcognitions teach how and wherein ta acknowledge that self.Vho there stops half-way, thus who cea.ses ta follow, cornesta confuse the proplial things and eruels by calling manswhat is the Lo1ds and the Lords what is mans. Just as in aIl things, in the proprium also there is a mar­riage of good and truth, which the1e is a marriage of theindebted and the possessive. In the indebted there is againa pair: the love of the Lord and the love of the neighbour;equally sa in the possessive, these there being out of the loveof self and the love of the world; which loves out of Creationare celestial loves. (D.L.W. 396.) Sa, when considering therelations of the indebted and the possessive in the p1opriaof the successive Churches, two things must first be stated:I. That those two parts of the proprium are related as the
  40. 40. Ta LIVE A LIFE FOLLOWING THE DOCTRINE III 45voluntary and the intellectual. II. That in thc beginningthe possessive, similarly as the indebted, was celestial. In the MOST ANCIENT CnuRcH the indebted and thepossessive were one in the perception, and we might speakof an indebted possessive, just as they had a voluntary intel­lectual from the Human Divine of the Lord. In the ANCIENT CI-IURCH these two werc separated, butnevertheless in the conscience they were together. In the HEBREW and the .TEWISH CHURCHES the indebtedperished entirely; the sun therein was darkened, and thepossessive no longer as a moon received its lumen therefrom,whereby it became a hot-bed of spontaneous generationsfrom hell, because the love of self and of the world in thatpossessive had gradually become completely infernal. rhere­fore their possessive - "the rich mans" possessive - bymiracles was compelled to give a representa1Jion of a Church;a Church itself they could no longer form, for it is the in­debted that makes the body of a Church. Then the Lord came inta the world in order to give outof His Divine Ruman a new indebted ta the proprium ofthe human race. The PRIMITIVE CHRISTIAN CHURCH hada new indebted and with that an entirely new disposition ofmind, at first without any possessive, which is to be under­stood by this that they could not then bear the many thingsthe Lord had yet to say. In the NEW CHURCH there now arises in the iml1lost ofthat new indebted - the good gift of the Coming - a newpossessive, the true gift of the Second Coming. To her i~the enjoyment of a possessive indebted, that is, the eI!­joyment of Doctrine of the Genuine rruth. From thc Lordsside this signifies: given the enjoyment, that is, for the gooduse of life. But from the Side of the man of the New Churchit signifies something else, namely: We owe to the Lord apossessive; we owe to the Lord Doctrine - the internaIsense of the parable of a certain Noblernan who gave to histen servants ten pounds, Luke XIX: 12-27. In this theNew Church also has an entirely different attitude fromthe primitive Christian Church, an entirely different sim­plicity and humility, which we must not confuse. Whosowishes ta withdraw himself from the truth that we owe tathe Lord a possessive, that we owe to the Lord Doctrine,by saying that he prefers a childlike simple faith, and
  41. 41. 46 ANTON ZELLINGwishes to keep to that, assumes a· semblance of a piet.1, asimplicity, an innocence, which misplacedly imitates thoscvirtues of the first Christians, without resembling themeven as to the outermost shooow. For of what untouchedvirginally pure, self-contained and whole stature thoscvirtues of the solely indebted of the first Christians were,is proved b.1 practically aIl wooden and stone images of theearly Middle Ages, these being anon.1mous holy arisiugsout of the Natural of the Lords Divine Human. fhe LordsComing brought to the human race a new inelebted - onwhich account so much is said in the Gospels about debt[schuld] , innocence [onschuld] , and indebtedness; theLords Second Coming plants in the midst of that a newpossessive as a Tree of Life - on which account the LatinWorel speaks of the delight of })ossession. lhe PRIMITIVECHRISTIAN CHURCH kept its indebted untouched, but lateron this indebted was corrupted, when they began to acquifca possessive not from the Lord, but from themselves, justlycalled a "degenerated manly facult.1", DE HElIŒLSCHELEER, Third Fascicle, p. 104. The NEW CHURCH could noteome into its possessive by soiling its indebted; the indebtedis no other than what is willing to follow, the voluntary offollowing Him in each and aIl things of life. The historyof the Churches 1S the history of the breach betwecn theinelebteel and the possessive, of which in Ismah: "The lightof the moon shall be as the Iight of the sun, and the light ofthe sun shall be sevenfold, as the light of seven days, in theday that the Lord bindeth up the b1"each of His people",XXX: 26. First in the NEW CHURCH that breach is fullybound up, and the Doctrine of the Church is its hereditarypossession, and those who confess it are heirs and sons ofGod. On this account the NEW CHUR CH is the crown ofChurches. But let us listen ta still something else in thissuperlative, namely that this Crowning Church is nat onlythe princely Church itself, but at the same time for theKing of kings is a Ch~t1"ch of princes. Every Doctrine ofGenuino Truth 1.S a prince, a prince of an aristocracy suchas the Most Ancient Church in its highest glor.1 has notknown. See ARcANA COELESTIA 9221-9222: "Thou shaltnot curse God, signifies that truths Divine must not beblasphemed.... And the prince in thy people thou shaltnot execrate, signifies that neither is the doctrine of truth
  42. 42. 10 LIVE A LlFE FOLLOWlNG THE DOCTRINE III 47to be blasphemed". Now this anew, but nO7 with the full estweight, lays down for us the significance and the respons­ibility of what society should be for us and we for society.For society is a [royal] fo11owing of which we then are thecourtiers, the noblemen. The New Church and in that Churchthe Doctrine of the Church brings a new disposition of mindalong with it, and Vith that disposition a new attitude,behaviour, yea, an entirely new education. If aU we had tocare about were an indebted, as with the first Christians,only to keep it pure; if a11 we had to care about were a pos­sessive, as with the Jews, only ta enlarge it, the case wouldbe simpler, and so with the majority it is, and is thereforewrong, for then there is a question of more or less, whileit is just said "not the leasl more Or less". The NEW CnuRcH, the Crown of Churches: well, let us in this superlative listento still something else: the Most Ancient Church in its goldenage "was not in the truth" , T.C.R. 786; this involves that therefore in the propel sense it was not in good. In the New Church for the first time since Creation the genuine truthsand goods sprout forth; and everything in history that hasbeen of great testimonies outof living life from theLord, hereand now in the Divine genuineness of this Crowning Chureh finds its fulfilment, perfection, essential being, regeneration. And if it flnds such in the New Church, it must also finc1 it ag-ain in the larger and sma11er society of that Church.If we understand the superlative above mentioned in that sense, a celestial superlative, it then becomes oppressivelycleM that a soeiety is a [royal] following of noblemen, thecourt of courts for that Church of churches. Not a party, not a club, not a private circle, a convention, a conference, but a society, that is a [royal] following of followers. In. His Coming the Lord said to His followers: "Ye arej;h-e salt of the earth"; in His Second Coming the Lord repeats this "vord, and even more: He vills to ennoble them all, to the nobility of His image and His likeness. We pUrposely used italics on page 59 for the word Nobleman, when quoting from the parable cOncerning the ten pounds in Luke XIX; the Latin text has Homo quidam nobilis, that is literally ft Nobleman. The word nobilis, of ancient time§. gnobWs, is derived from..0_know, to be acquainted with, to have beén ImoWJl from antiquity. In that sense let the nobility of the New Church be understood, a nobility of conscience. For as
  43. 43. 48 ANTON ZELLING regards the worlds nobility, the same may be said as of fonner churches: "By not keeping its purity, it did flot come to where it should and could have come". And just as a fallen Church was newly re-erected among another just nation, among heathens, so the fallen nobility arises anew among other just families, among citizens, for nobility from its origin, its first root, is celestial. N obility is nothing but a natural -ennobled from the Lord, not ollly a standing, a state, a degree higher, but also every standing, state, and degree purer and cleaner. Taken in that sense ta reg-enerate is to ennoble, to raise to nobility. Therefore if we here speak of nobility in connection with the Church, with society, and with the man of the Church, we thereby understand the truths of life having become lite; in them is the nobility seated, and in no sense in the truths of faith unless conjoined therewith; only that application ennobles, and where that nobility is missing man lacks the ultimates by which the Lord from firsts can operate the truths of faith. The nobility of the NEW CHURCH is the nobility of the ennobled natural (adel [nobility] is derived from kind, nature, heredita.ry ground, yea even from good), and in the man of the Church the nobility is nothing but his virtue, his virtue as the salt of the earth. The sublime moralist La Bruyère said striking­ ly: "If nobility is virtue, it perishes by everything unvir­ tuous, and if it is not virtue, it is of small account", Les Caractères, ch. 14. In the old ,dead churches they do not quite know what to do about the attitude and behaviour of man to God and to his fellow-man, and consequently they sway( between a theoretical self-abasemellt and a condescellding, amiability, both evil and false to their verY_2_Q!-,e, laying bare the unbound and the unbindablebreacn-oetween a violated iudebted and a falsified Ilossessive. With the New éhurch a new nobility arises, whëreffiân not only knows his rank l!~d_place but also his attitude as a nobleman; yea,~ly-from the KMwn attitude cau he know his place in the temple, and the nobility of that known attitude he receives froml the Lord in cach truth of life applied ta life. In our attitude the relation between truths of life and truths of faith appears noble, royal, stately, if there is a ratio between life and faitt, not the least more or less; ignoble, slavish, lop­ sided, if there is on either side a tao much or a tao little. May we be allowed to continue this theme frankly and open­

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