• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Georgia STEM Science Initiative
 

Georgia STEM Science Initiative

on

  • 330 views

Science Education, Georgia

Science Education, Georgia

Statistics

Views

Total Views
330
Views on SlideShare
329
Embed Views
1

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

1 Embed 1

http://www.yazarlikokulu.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Georgia STEM Science Initiative Georgia STEM Science Initiative Document Transcript

    • Science Initiative 2013 Proposal Written by: Francia McCormack Wilson, M.Ed Attention: Doug Harabe, Director of Fernbank Science Center, DeKalb County School District Chris Robinson, Science Coordinator, DeKalb County School District Deneen McBean­Warner, Science Coordinator, DeKalb County School District Stan Watson, Commissioner of District 7 deneen_p_mcbean­Warner@fc.dekalb.k12.ga.us doug_hrabe@fc.dekalb.k12.ga.us christopher_j_robinson@fc.dekalb.k12.ga.us
    • I am writing this grant for the teachers of the state of Georgia. Georgia will be one of the states leading the way to redefining science standards. According to the press release from Achieve.org “American students continue to lag internationally in science education, making them less competitive for the jobs of the present and the future. A recent U.S. Department of Commerce study shows that over the past 10 years, growth in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) jobs was three times greater than that of non­STEM jobs. The report also shows that STEM jobs are expected to continue to grow at a faster rate than other jobs in the coming decade.” In order to better educate students, the state plans to adopt national science standards that will be a step in the right direction of changing  the way teachers educate their students. I feel Georgia is a confident in leading changes ahead. Something amazing that happens in DeKalb County schools is a resource called the Fernbank Science Center. An instructional unit of DeKalb County, it is not attached with the museum. This facility houses scientists in many subjects dedicated to teaching the children and acting as a resource for teachers. This resource helps foster love and better understanding in young hearts. In the past programs like Scientific Tools & Technology (STT) encouraged young science lovers to learn about the many sciences like aerospace and physics, classes they would normally not take in their high schools.
    • I propose 1. Expanding the programs at Fernbank into more classrooms. This includes Expansion/Reinstitution of programs like STT for high school students. 2. Provide teacher training at least once a semester focused on science lesson plans. 3. Create a lesson plan database based on partnerships with universities (Memorandums of Understanding) 4. Create classroom relationships with labs in Georgia universities. Relationships will create understanding of real life laboratory experiences and experiments. 4. Scholarship opportunities agreed upon in the Memorandums of Understanding for high achieving science students. Examples: Statisticians that work in the Department of Natural Resources can teach teachers how they compile date of tree diseases and the general health of Georgia trees. Partnerships can be established where students can work alongside national and state agencies cataloguing information. A Canadian student working with PBS and a university catalogued the amount of compost his worms were decomposing by measuring the food going into the compost and the compost waste coming out for at least 3 years. He shared his measurements, which fed into a larger database of information. http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/675/preview/ Improving the Numbers In order for us to improve the number of scientists feeding science jobs of Georgia’s future, we must begin to invest in effective teaching strategies that educators can pass along to their students. We need to help teachers and students visualize and experience the type of work needed to advance the State’s scientific community now and in the future. We should also attempt to reach all students of Georgia by creating a component in the Georgia Virtual Academy for homeschooled children. Another component that can be fun, but relevant would be a literary component focused on science fiction writing. A writing contest designed for students to imagine their science projects
    • and research in a fictional world. This could be another add­on component to an expanding science fair. The fair should have winners guaranteed scholarships, placement into Fernbank Science programs like Scientific Tools & Technology and learning workshops for teachers, students and families. Gone are the days where the science fair is just about students­only projects. Not only should students have their own projects, but they should have their classroom projects up for competition. If students and teachers had real world scientists providing insight, there would be an enlightening change in the way academia relates to the science workforce. Academia can help as well. Our resources in Georgia are plentiful. Georgia Tech, Georgia State University and the University of Georgia are just a few of our phenomenal research facilities. If research projects adopted a classroom, students could learn from actual research and scientists. Seeing scientists formulate their hypotheses and then move on to researching could give valuable experience to classrooms. Innovative Workshops for Continuing Education With resources like the Smithsonian for educators or the NASA Quest Program we can introduce teachers to a number of lesson plans. By creating a regular workshop space for teachers for Continuing Education credits could provide the time and space, and incentive to introduce teachers to scientists interested in teaming up with a classroom and innovative lesson plans. The workshops will be comprised of scientists, researchers and teachers. Their goal would be to find common ground and creating partnerships.
    • Student Components ● Increase Science Fairs ­ 1st semester and 2nd semester ● Science Fiction Literary contest ● Trips to research facilities connected to classroom ● Classroom lab assignments designed to incorporate lesson plans derived from Triad. ● Curriculum assessment based on Triad team’s rubric created in Teacher/Team workshops. Teacher Components ● Workshops ­ 1st semester and 2nd Semester ● Triad Team Workshop ● Creating a learning strategy and/or Lab­based Lesson Plan for the semester ● Decide Science Projects ● Determine Assessment ● Coordinate Field Trips ● Meet Curriculum Standards The Main Facilitator for these Triad Teams will be the Fernbank Science Center, which is already an established science facility in the community.
    • Links: http://fox43.com/2012/12/20/the­science­class­of­the­not­too­distant­future/ http://www.achieve.org/states­lead­effort­write­new­science­standards http://fsc.fernbank.edu/ http://www.ted.com/talks/mitch_resnick_let_s_teach_kids_to_code.html http://www.blackgirlscode.com/what­we­do.html