Systemic Innovation in Vocational Education and Training

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Summary of the main findings and policy implications arising from the OECD Centre for Educational Research and Innovation on Systemic Innovation in Vocational Education and Training.

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Systemic Innovation in Vocational Education and Training

  1. 1. Systemic Innovation in Vocational Education and Training Francesc Pedró 14 October 2009 Centre for Educational Research and Innovation (CERI)
  2. 2. What counts as innovation? • Innovation? “the implementation of a new or significantly improved product (good or service), or process, a new marketing method, or a new organisational method in business practices, workplace organisation or external relations” (Oslo Manual, OECD/Eurostat) • Innovation in education? Change that adds value: performance, process or perceived satisfaction • Systemic Innovation? How a system manages innovation holistically: Inspires, funds, monitors, assesses, and scales it up
  3. 3. Innovation is always relative • To context • To stakeholder
  4. 4. Overview • Objectives – Investigate how systems go about innovation in VET – Processes and stakeholders relationships – KM perspective • Methodology – Desk research, questionnaire plus 14 case studies • Countries – Australia, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Mexico, and Switzerland • Outputs – Country reports: www.oecd.org/edu/systemicinnovation/vet – Full report: Working Out Change
  5. 5. Main Findings • Drivers • Pumps • Enablers/Barriers • Specific barriers in VET • Conclusions/policy implications
  6. 6. Drivers • Economic – Development of new skills – Efficiency • Social – Equity – Inclusion • Political • Technological
  7. 7. Pumps • Vision • Networks • Technology
  8. 8. The emergence of an innovative education industry? Growth of patent applications: Worldwide new education technologies (1990-2006) Education technologies by year - Main Countries Japan, 2006, (MA(3) - Patent Families only) 358.6666667 USA, 2003, 274.6666667 EU27, 2006, 177.3333333 China, 2006, 43 Korea, 2002, 36.33333333 USA Japan EU27 Korea China
  9. 9. Pumps • Vision • Networks • Technology • Research
  10. 10. Educational research and development Total expenditure as % of GDP Share of total public research (country average in recent years) expenditures (2008) on 9 9 8 8 7 7 6 6 5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 0 0 Education Health Education Health
  11. 11. Enablers / Barriers • Leadership • Consensus building • Research evidence • Brokerage: generation and dissemination of knowledge
  12. 12. Specific barriers • Competing policy agendas • Accountability mechanisms and public policy agendas: – Restricted risk management – Short-term planning • Innovation fatigue
  13. 13. Conclusions Policy implications  Systemic innovation as  SI VET as guiding useful analytical principle for innovation framework policy – Targeted strategy to induce system-wide change  Establish a formalised  Need for formalised knowledge base knowledge base – Monitoring and evaluation – Losing innovation opportunities – Support link between systems research and innovation – Evidence-informed dialogue with stakeholders
  14. 14. Who counts in innovation?
  15. 15. Thank you! More information: www.oecd.org/edu/systemicinnovation Francesc.PEDRO@OECD.org

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