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David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
David ausubel
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David ausubel

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  • 1. David Ausubel:Meaningful Learning Theory<br />
  • 2. Biography<br />Born: October 25, 1918 <br />Died: July 9, 2008<br /> Grew up in Brooklyn, New York<br />He graduated from medical school at Middlesex University. <br />Later he earned a Ph.D in Developmental Psychology at Columbia University.<br /> He was influenced by the work of Piaget.<br />
  • 3. Biography<br /><ul><li>In 1973, Ausubel retired from academic life and devoted himself to his psychiatric practice. 
  • 4.  In 1976, he received the Thorndike Award from the American Psychological Association for "Distinguished Psychological Contributions to Education".</li></li></ul><li>Meaningful Learning Theory<br />Concerned with how students learn large amounts of meaningful material from verbal/textual presentations in a learning activities.<br />Meaningful learning results when new information is acquired by linking the new information in the learner’s own cognitive structure<br />Learning is based on the representational, superordinate and combinatorial processes that occur during the reception of information.<br />A primary process in learning is subsumptionin which new material is related to relevant ideas in the existing cognitive structure on a non-verbatim basis (previous knowledge)<br />
  • 5. The processes of meaningful learning:<br />Ausubel proposed four processes by which meaningful learning occur:<br />Derivative Subsumption<br />Correlative Subsumption<br />Superordinate Learning<br />Combinatorial Learning <br />
  • 6. Meaningful Learning Theory<br />Derivative Subsumption<br />Describes the situation in which the new information pupils learn is an instance or example of a concept that pupils have already learned. <br />Correlative Subsumption<br />More valuable learning than that of derivative subsumption, since it enriches the higher-level concept. <br />
  • 7. Meaningful Learning Theory<br />Superordinate Learning<br />In this case, you already knew a lot of examples of the concept, but you did not know the concept until it was taught to pupils<br />Combinatorial Learning<br />It describes a process by which the new idea is derived from another idea that is comes from his previous knowledge (in a different, but related, “branch”) <br />Students could think of this as learning by analogy<br />
  • 8. Principles of Ausubel’s Meaningful Reception Learning Theory<br />Within a classroom setting include:<br />The most general ideas of a subject should be presented first and then progressively differentiated in terms of detail and specificity.<br />Instructional materials should attempt to integrate new material with previouslypresented information through comparisons and cross-referencing of new and oldideas.<br />
  • 9. Principles of Ausubel’s Meaningful Reception Learning Theory<br />Instructors should incorporate advance organizers when teaching a new concept.<br />Instructors should use a number of examples and focus on both similarities and differences.<br />Classroom application of Ausubel's theory should discourage rote learning of materials that can be learned more meaningfully.<br />The most important single factor influencing learning is what the learner already knows.<br />
  • 10. Summary<br />For Ausubel, meaningful learning is a process that related new information relevant to the concepts contained in a person’s cognitive structure.  <br />In order to be meaningful to students ‘learning, then learning should be linked and relevant to students’ cognitive structures.  <br />Relevance to students’ cognitive structures can happen when we pay attention to early knowledge of the concepts that preceded the concept to be learned. <br />
  • 11. Summary<br />It is important for students to construct knowledge through learning.<br />The essential theory of meaningful learning is a teaching which Ausubel enables students can associate the beginning of knowledge with new knowledge that will learn and how teachers can facilitate learning by preparing the facility as a presentation of the subject matter which allows students to build knowledge in discovery learning activities. <br />

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