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Introduction to The Raft

Introduction to The Raft

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  • 1. Introduction MacMillan/ McGraw-Hill Treasures 4th Grade Unit 1 – Week 5 Created by Teresa Wilson Desert Palms Elem. July 2010 The font used in this presentation is Minya Nouvelle and can be downloaded for free at http://www.1001fonts.com
  • 2.
    • Read a realistic fiction
    • Make inferences and analyze text to
    • come to a conclusion about the plot
    • or characters
    • Learn about how the setting of a
    • story may affect what happens in
    • the plot
    OBJECTIVES Today we will...…
  • 3.
    • disgusted
    • If you have a sick feeling of strong dislike, you are disgusted .
    • raft
    • A raft is a kind of flat boat.
    • scattered
    • Objects that are scattered are spread or
    • thrown about here and there.
    VOCABULARY REVIEW
  • 4.
    • cluttered
    • If something is filled with a messy collection of things, it is cluttered .
    • downstream
    • Downstream means in the same
    • direction as the current of a stream.
    • nuzzle
    • If you nuzzle something, you touch or rub it
    • with your nose.
    VOCABULARY REVIEW
  • 5. GENRE: Realistic Fiction
    • Realistic fiction is a made up
    • story that could have happened
    • in real life.
    • Characters and setting are
    • realistic and believable.
    • Events in the story are things
    • that really could happen.
  • 6. STRATEGY: Make Inferences
    • Authors do not always directly tell the
    • reader everything that is happening in a
    • story.
    • One way good readers can analyze a story is
    • to compare their own life experiences to
    • those of the characters and drawing
    • reasonable conclusions about the
    • the way the setting affects the plot.
    • The setting of a story may affect what
    • happens in the plot, and may also affect
    • what the characters say and do.
  • 7. PREVIEW & PREDICT
    • When I say “Go”, take 1 minute to preview the illustrations.
    • Ask yourself:
      • In what kind of surroundings does
      • the story take place?
      • How might that affect what happens
      • in the story?
    • On your index card, write your
    • predictions. After we listen to the selection, we will see if your
    • questions were answered.
  • 8. FOCUS QUESTION
    • Read to find out...
    • What was it that turned Nicky’s summer around?
      • NOW…you will read along as we listen to ...
  • 9.  
  • 10. Let’s Check our Predictions!
    • Share with your criss-cross/shoulder partner your predictions. Were they correct?
    • Did you figure out what turned Nicky’s summer around?
    • TOMORROW WE WILL...…
    • Use our “Setting Flow Chart” to answer the Comprehension Check questions on page 137.