Compound sentences
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Compound sentences

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    Compound sentences Compound sentences Presentation Transcript

    • Compound Sentences A Grammar Lesson for 4 th Grade Created by Teresa Wilson – Desert Palms Elem. – July 2010 Clipart used is from www.pppst.com
      • An independent clause can stand alone as a sentence.
      • A simple sentence has one independent clause.
      • Monique threw a strike.
      A clause is a group of words that has a subject and a verb.
    • A simple sentence contains one subject and one predicate.
      • It contains one complete thought.
      We had a garage sale.
    • A compound sentence has two or more independent clauses. Mario scored a goal, and the crowd went wild. Both independent clauses can stand alone as sentences. ___________ _________ ___
    • Two simple sentences may be joined to form a compound sentence .
      • It contains two complete thoughts.
      • It has two subjects and two predicates.
      • A conjunction is used to combine the two sentences.
    • The clauses in compound sentences are often combined using coordinating conjunctions .
      • Some of the coordinating conjunctions used to combine clauses are and , but , and or .
      • Use a comma when you combine clauses using a conjunction.
    • I wanted to buy two new hats, but I didn’t have the budget.
      • The scientists were working hard,
      • and they still hadn’t found a cure.
    • A compound subject contains two or more simple subjects that may have the same predicate.
      • Meg and John were looking
      • at the map.
    • A compound predicate contains two or more simple predicates that have the same subject.
      • The leaves fall and cover the ground .