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Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
Emergency supplies for the farm 2
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Emergency supplies for the farm 2

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  • 1. Emergency Supplies for the Farm
    • Corey Childs
    • Extension Agent
  • 2. Seventy-two-hour Emergency Kit
    • The 48-72-hour emergency kit is designed to help you ride out the immediate impact of a disaster, making certain that essentials are provided for.
    • A plastic trash barrel with lid can be used for a multitude of things and can store many of the items in the kit when it’s not needed.
    • Pack one or two tarpaulins for protection and a multiple water buckets.
  • 3. Feed Resources
    • If you have time to prepare, make sure to have enough hay, feed, and water for each animal for at least three days stored safely – though a 7 day period would be better. Winter supplies should always be 10-14 days on hand
      • It is very possible that roads will be closed because of downed power lines and trees, or snow limiting access to feed trucks. Cover hay with waterproof tarps and place it on pallets to reduce the chance of the hay sitting in water and keep grain in water-tight containers.
  • 4. Emergency health supplies on hand should include:
    • Exam gloves
    • Betadine or Nolvasan solutions for cleaning and disinfecting wounds
    • Antibiotic ointment
    • Sterile gauze pads
    • Absorbent dressings
    • Cotton leg wraps and Vetrap bandaging tape/standing wraps to secure them
    • Thermometer
    • Bandage scissors
    • Sterile saline
  • 5. Supplies continued:
    • Knife and wire cutters
    • Duct tape
    • Fire-resistant leads and halters
    • Clean towels
    • Fly spray
    • Livestock markers or paint
    • Regular bleach (unscented, with hypochlorite as the only active ingredient; can be used to purify water for drinking*)
    • Lime (can be used for sanitation)
    • Portable radio
    • Flashlight
    • Extra batteries
  • 6. Emergency tools:
    • Chainsaw and fuel
    • Hammer and nails
    • Fence repair materials
    • Wire cutters
    • Pry bar
    • Fire extinguisher
  • 7. How much do they need? MINIMUM
    • Animal Recommendations - FEMA
    • WATER/DAY FEED/DAY
  • 8. Dairy Cattle
    • COWS IN PRODUCTION
    • 9 GALLONS SUMMER 20 POUNDS HAY
    • 7 GALLONS WINTER
    • DRY COWS
    • 9 GALLONS SUMMER 20 POUNDS HAY
    • 7 GALLONS WINTER
    • YEARLING CATTLE
    • 6 GALLONS SUMMER 8-12 POUNDS HAY
    • 3 GALLONS WINTER
  • 9. Beef Cattle
    • Dry
    • 7 GALLONS SUMMER 10-15 POUNDS hay
    • 6 GALLONS WINTER
    • COW WITH CALF
    • 9 GALLONS SUMMER 12-18 POUNDS hay
    • 8 GALLONS WINTER
    • WEANED CALF (400 POUNDS) Wet calves 2-4 gallons/per day
    • 6 GALLONS SUMMER 8-12 POUNDS hay
    • 4 GALLONS WINTER
  • 10. SWINE
    • BROOD SOW WITH LITTER
    • 4 GALLONS SUMMER 8 POUNDS GRAIN
    • 3 GALLONS WINTER
    • BROOD SOW (PREGNANT)
    • 1-2 GALLONS SUMMER 2 POUNDS GRAIN
    • 1 GALLON WINTER
    • 150 POUND GILT OR BOAR
    • 1 GALLON Summer/Winter 3 POUNDS GRAIN
  • 11. SHEEP &GOATS
    • EWE WITH LAMB
    • 1 GALLON 5 POUNDS HAY
    • EWE, DRY
    • 3 QUARTS 3 POUNDS HAY
    • WEANING LAMB
    • 2 QUARTS 3 POUNDS HAY
  • 12. POULTRY
    • LAYERS
    • 5 GALLONS/100 BIRDS
    • 17 POUNDS/100 BIRDS
    • BROILERS
    • 5 GALLONS/100 BIRDS
    • 10 POUNDS/100 BIRDS
    • TURKEYS
    • 12 GALLONS/100 BIRDS
    • 40 POUNDS/100 BIRDS
  • 13. HORSES
    • ALL BREEDS
    • 5 GALLONS/1000 POUNDS (plus 20% for late gestation females)
    • 20 POUNDS HAY/1000 POUNDS
  • 14. DOGS AND CATS
    • ALL BREEDS
    • 1 QUART/DAY/ANIMAL
    • AD LIBITUM DRY FOOD
  • 15. Alternative Storage and Power
    • Fill all the water troughs barrels nd buckets. Additional water can be stored in garbage cans with plastic liners.
    • Consider melting snow or ice.
    • You might want to consider purchasing a generator to run the well if you have a large number of animals.
  • 16. Form Neighborhood Team:
    • Talk with a neighbor or friend and make arrangements to check on each other after a disaster.
    • Tell one another if you are evacuating and to where so someone else will know where you are going. Buddies may agree to pool resources for such items as generators, water tanks, trailers, etc.
    • You will also want to have a network of people outside the disaster area that you and your friends and neighbors can contact to check on each other, because the local communication infrastructure may be compromised and not available.
  • 17. Questions?

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