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Do Less - Founder-Centric F-Day at UCL SMILE
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Do Less - Founder-Centric F-Day at UCL SMILE

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  • \n
  • [Success is likely going to be a matter of learning to be *extremely* effective with your time and resources. Having too much to throw at the problem will prevent you from achieving that efficiency. ]\n
  • <Are you doing the efficient minimum of every task?\nAre you taking on too much and thus getting less done?>\n
  • <Funding, revenue & bigger teams don’t give you less to do. Prioritisation & focus become tougher, not easier.>\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • [There are many paths to your vision, and if you get stuck on one that doesn’t work, you’re probably committing your vision to failure.]\n
  • [One of the biggest questions we had to tackle at Leancamp is how to make it easier to run. We kept trying different ways to do less.]\n
  • Groupspaces and students. iWeb in cafes, then hotels. [The hard part about being all things to all people isn’t always what you do or what features you build - it’s often how you communicate your value.]\n
  • <Find Earlyvangelists - your local guides. They know the characters, the way around & obstacles. #leanstartup>\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • [If you’re trying to learn from a customer group and getting mixed signals, ask yourself if you’re actually talking to multiple segments. How can you split them up? Would that make the feedback more consistent?]\n
  • \n
  • [If you’re learning from customers but still suffering from a lack of direction, being pickier about your target customer might help focus.]\n
  • <Specific target customers = acting more decisively. It's easy to move on when you get a no.>\n
  • <Thanks to @alexosterwalder and @brantcooper. We’re going to zoom-in on our target customers based on your work!>\n
  • [The Customer Value Map is a tool to help zoom-in to the connection between customer segments and value propositions in a business model. In this workshop, we use it to explore the life of our target customer so we can identify better, more specific segments.]\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • [Let’s look at an example based on a side project of mine. A bit of code I wrote for my blog that I open-sourced. It takes sentences on your blog, and makes them tweetable.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • [This is easier to understand when I explain in person, but effectively we start with “bloggers” as the target customer, and realise that bloggers have slightly different pain points around tweeting new posts, and getting people to share stuff in their archive, then looking at what jobs the bloggers are doing, and what they stand to gain, we see that some blog to sell and others for influence. Realising that the “competition” to blogging can be public speaking or book writing, we identify a clearer target customer, authors who are using their blog to test content for an unwritten book.]\n
  • Transcript

    • 1. Not enough time?Not enough money?
    • 2. Do less.
    • 3. Grow with efficiency.
    • 4. 3 ways toDo Less. Limiting work-in-progress. Letting go. Being picky about your first customers.
    • 5. Limit your work in progress.
    • 6. TenacityGood for vision,inventing and improving.Bad for getting stuck onspecifics that don’t work.
    • 7. Early traction.
    • 8. Earlyvangelists Have the problem Know they have the problem! Have budget to solve it. Have looked for a solution. Have tried to build a solution.
    • 9. Choose yourcustomer.
    • 10. Vaguecustomerdefinitions.
    • 11. Multiple customer definitions.
    • 12. Is this conversation useful?
    • 13. Lack of direction.
    • 14. Clear definitions speed progress.
    • 15. Specific definitionsallow for validation or invalidation.
    • 16. Zoom in!Find early adopters.Find specific customers.Specific value propositions aremore compelling and help youget early traction.(Thanks to Alex Osterwalder and Brant Cooper -this workshop is based on their work.)
    • 17. Gain Gains, goals creators & passionsProducts Jobs-to- & be-donebundles Pain Pains & relievers obstacles Customer Value Map
    • 18. Drill-down questionsWhat’s the root cause?Why is this a problem? What bigger job, problem or gain doesthis fit into?Can this be split up into different types?Are there different types of this job, or different types of thispain-point?Does this relationship exist every time?Are all customers with this pain doing the same job? Do allcustomers who choose this gain creator have the same measureor passion?Are there particular customers that match these new groups?Can you define that customer segment in one word? Are they “athing?” Are they easily findable?
    • 19. ExamplesDo all customers have this pain/gain?Do all customers with this pain/gain choose this painreliever/gain creator?When a customer has this pain, what job are they doing?Do all customers with this job have this pain/gain?
    • 20. How deep do you go? Until your customer descriptions start to get shorter. Until you have a customer segment that is specific enough to give you a falsifiable hypothesis. Until you have an understandable customer group that you can access. (Identifiable in a word or two, not a set of attributes.)
    • 21. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done SegmentsTweetableText Bloggers Pains Pain relievers
    • 22. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done SegmentsTweetableText Bloggers Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love!
    • 23. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done SegmentsTweetableText Bloggers Bad bloggers Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love!
    • 24. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done SegmentsTweetableText Bloggers Bad bloggers Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love! Archives get no love!
    • 25. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done SegmentsTweetableText Bloggers Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love! Archives get no love!
    • 26. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done SegmentsTweetable GettingText traffic Bloggers Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love! Archives get no love!
    • 27. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText traffic Bloggers Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love! Archives get no love!
    • 28. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Customer base traffic Bloggers Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pains Pain relievers Posts get no love! Archives get no love!
    • 29. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Customer base traffic Bloggers Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no love!
    • 30. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no love!
    • 31. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence
    • 32. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers!
    • 33. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers!
    • 34. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Writing books Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers!
    • 35. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Writing books Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers! Authors!
    • 36. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Writing books Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Bad bloggers Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Guest posts Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers! Authors!
    • 37. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Writing books Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Get Bad bloggers conversations going Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Guest posts Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers! Authors!
    • 38. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Writing books Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Get Bad bloggers Understanding conversations going Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Guest posts Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers! Authors!
    • 39. Products & Gain creators Gains Jobs-to- Customer bundles be-done Doing talks Audience SegmentsTweetable GettingText Writing books Customer base traffic Bloggers Influence Get Bad bloggers Understanding conversations going Bloggers w/ archives Pain relievers Pains Bloggers w/ Posts get no love! customers Guest posts Archives get no Bloggers who want love! influence Speakers! Authors! Authors starting a book