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Renaissance allegory

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  • 1. The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 2. Themes: Classical mythology Nature (Botany) Spring (The Weather) Marriage Love (Platonic) Re-birth (Renaissance) PoetrySunday, 6 March 2011
  • 3. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 4. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 5. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 6. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 7. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 8. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 9. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 10. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 11. Composition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 12. Composition male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 13. Composition male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 14. Composition female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 15. Composition female female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 16. Composition female female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 17. Composition female female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 18. Composition female female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 19. Composition female female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 20. Composition female female male male The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 21. Composition Technique: female female balance male male order harmony framing rhythm control structure symmetry repetition The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 22. Composition Technique: Effects: female female balance male male flowing order sinuous harmony serpentine framing gentle rhythm graceful control delicate structure vibrant symmetry mysterious repetition idealised The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 23. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 24. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 25. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 26. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 27. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 28. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 29. The Gaze The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 30. The Gaze ? The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 31. The Gaze ? ? The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 32. Allegory: An allegory is a device used to present an idea, principle or meaning, which can be presented in literary form, such as a poem or novel, or in visual form, such as in painting or sculpture. Allegory communicates its message by means of symbolic figures, actions or symbolic representation.Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 33. Allegory The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 34. Allegory Zephyrus The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 35. Allegory Zephyrus Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 36. Allegory Zephyrus Flora Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 37. Allegory The Graces Zephyrus Flora Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 38. Allegory Mercury The Graces Zephyrus Flora Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 39. Allegory Cupid Mercury The Graces Zephyrus Flora Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 40. Allegory Cupid Mercury The Graces Venus Zephyrus Flora Chloris The Primavera by Botticelli, c.1482Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 41. Platonic Love: The term amor platonicus was coined as early as the 15th century by the Florentine scholar Marsilio Ficino. Platonic love in this original sense of the term is examined in Platos dialogue the Symposium, which has as its topic the subject of love or Eros generally. With genuine platonic love, the beautiful or lovely other person inspires the mind and the soul and directs ones attention to spiritual things. One proceeds from recognition of the beauty of another to appreciation of beauty as it exists apart from any individual, to consideration of divinity, the source of beauty, to love of divinity.Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 42. The Birth of Venus by Botticelli, c.1486Sunday, 6 March 2011
  • 43. Patronage: Along with Da Vinci and Michelangelo, Botticelli was supported by Lorenzo de’Medici, a member of the ruling family of fifteenth century Florence, Italy. Lorenzo, while a poor business man was successful at promoting the arts and philosophical learning. He secured patrons for his favoured artists; he supported Neoplatonic debate that fuelled the development of humanism. Lorenzo’s humanistic influence in Botticelli’s work can be seen in the neopagan themes in his most famous paintings, The Birth of Venus and Primavera. A few of his earlier religious works include members of the Medici clan-- for example, portraits of Cosimo, Giovanni and Giuliano de’ Medici appear in the Adoration of the Magi. Pope Sixtus IV was briefly a patron of Botticelli. Sixtus IV summoned him to work on the Sistine Chapel. Scenes from the Life of Moses is one of the frescos he painted on the north and south walls of the chapel. His paintings in the Sistine Chapel did not achieve the fame of those completed by Michelangelo, and in fact are not considered some of his best work.Sunday, 6 March 2011