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Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
Send & See Email
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Send & See Email

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  • Before you begin: Before you can send and see messages, Outlook must be configured correctly. Here’s a great place to go to start that process: “ Outlook Overview: Setting up e-mail accounts in Outlook” at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HA011248131033.aspx. In some corporations, message format is set when Outlook is installed. If this applies to your audience, only parts of this course may be useful for them. [ Note to trainer: For detailed help in customizing this template, see the very last slide. Also, look for additional lesson text in the notes pane of some slides.]
  • Why would this happen and how can you avoid this scenario? Read this lesson to find out.
  • Before we delve into e-mail formats, we want you to think about the people who receive your e-mail messages and how they're reading them. E-mail viewers and servers differ in their capacity to handle e-mail formats and attachments. If the majority of people that you correspond with are outside of your company and are using an e-mail system that's different from yours, they may not see what you see. What's worse, what you send them may be driving them nuts.
  • For example, if you send someone a message formatted with rich text over the Internet, she may receive a text file with an attachment called "Winmail.dat" rather than the nicely formatted message you intended to send.
  • Also keep in mind that adding a picture or an attachment can increase the size of a message.
  • For example, you can use bold and colors to point out what’s really important, and you can even include hyperlinks. Used sparingly, these formatting features can improve your ability to deliver the message you intend. And, because most popular e-mail programs understand HTML, chances are good that when you use HTML, your recipient will see the message as you intend.
  • Not that RTF can't be good. One benefit of this message format is that you can show attachments inline. This can be useful, for example, if you want to send a collection of documents in a message and include notes about what each document contains. But even this benefit is only useful when you're sending e-mail messages to people who are using Outlook running under Microsoft Exchange Server. Otherwise, you're better off forgoing RTF and sticking with HTML or Plain Text.
  • If you're curious about blocked attachments, see “Blocked attachments: It’s about security” later in this course or the "Useful links" section of the Quick Reference Card (there’s a link to this at the end of the course). [ Note to trainer: Steps or callouts—presented in either numbered or bulleted lists—are always shown in yellow text.]
  • Plain Text format is a very predictable format. All e-mail programs understand it; and, as we just mentioned, Plain Text format produces the smallest message files of Outlook’s available formats.
  • There's a benefit for you, too: If you save your sent messages, Plain Text messages will take the least amount of disk space to store. The downside? With Plain Text, you can't use anything fun, like bold, italics, or color. Tip: You can change some settings for Plain Text messages, such as the default font and the number of characters allowed in a line before the text wraps. We'll tell you how to change the font in the practice session at the end of this lesson, and we'll talk a little about line length in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course.
  • What if you change your mind? You can always change the format of a message—even if you've already started writing it. How you do this will depend on whether you’re using Microsoft Word as your e-mail editor. With Word as your e-mail editor, choose the format you want on the message toolbar. If you've turned off Word as your e-mail editor, you're using the Outlook editor. Choose a new format using the Format menu.
  • By default, Word is selected as your e-mail editor.
  • You can change the settings for this filter if you want to increase or decrease the amount of formatting information that's included with your message. We've included instructions for how to change the settings for this filter in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course.
  • Note: Received messages will have the format that the sender chose when he or she created and sent the message to you. However, there is an option to view all received messages in Plain Text if that's your preference. We'll cover that in "Received messages: The sender sets the format” later on in this course.
  • [ Note to trainer: With Outlook 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Outlook, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Outlook 2003, you won’t be able to access the practice session.]
  • Now that you've thought a bit about the impact your sent messages can make, think of the format of messages that come to you. With Outlook, you can control how you see the messages you receive.
  • For example, there is an option to view all received messages in Plain Text if that's your preference. Even better, Outlook contains some built-in safeguards to help protect both your sensibilities (you can control what you see) and your security: Outlook will block some attachments, and it won't download images unless you specify that you want it to.
  • Although this enforced blocking makes file sharing less convenient, you should be aware that you can still use e-mail to share any file type with trusted friends and colleagues—you'll just need to take a few extra steps for the sake of enhanced security. For more information about ways to send and receive attached files, see “About unblocking attachments” at http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/assistance/HP073264181033.aspx.
  • By default, Outlook does not download pictures in HTML messages in order to lessen these risks. (If you want to change this default setting, use the Change Automatic Download Settings command that's shown in the picture. There is more information in the Quick Reference Card at the end of this course).
  • If you are sure that you always want to see pictures in e-mail from a particular sender, you can add that name or Internet domain to your Safe Senders list right from the e-mail message. Outlook will then download pictures in e-mail messages sent from that person or domain. To show pictures in the message, right-click any picture or click the text at the top of the message. Note: Pictures are blocked only when they're the type that are downloaded into an HTML e-mail message by calling the picture information from an outside computer. This is how an organization might add pictures kept on their own computer to a newsletter or to an advertisement sent to you in e-mail. Pictures that you attach to a message, or that your friend attaches to a message and sends to you, would not be blocked by this feature.
  • If you're willing to forgo the benefits of color, useful formatting, and other niceties, you could benefit from greater peace of mind. Plain Text format offers you privacy, security, and the simplest possible text styles in a message (if that's what you happen to like).
  • Here's why: Even though you don't view the message using HTML or RTF, Outlook stores this formatting information for you in case you change your mind later. To read the messages you receive in Plain Text format, select the Read all standard mail in plain text check box (in the E-mail Options dialog box).
  • [ Note to trainer: With Outlook 2003 installed on your computer, you can click the link in the slide to go to an online practice. In the practice, you can work through each of these tasks in Outlook, with instructions to guide you. Important: If you don’t have Outlook 2003, you won’t be able to access the practices.]
  • Using This Template This Microsoft Office PowerPoint ® template has training content about controlling the format you send and receive e-mail messages in. It's geared for a corporate trainer to present to a group and customize as necessary. This template's content is adapted from the Microsoft Office Online Training course “Control how you send and see mail messages.” Features of the template Title slide: On the very first slide, there are empty brackets over which you should type the name of your company. Or you can delete the text box altogether if you don't want this text. Animations: Custom animation effects are applied throughout. They'll play in previous versions back to Microsoft PowerPoint 2000. They include the entrance effects called Peek and Stretch , and sometimes the Dissolve effect is used. To alter them, go to the Slide Show menu, click Custom Animation , and work with the options that appear. Slide transitions: The Wipe Down transition is applied throughout the show. If you want a different one, go to the Slide Show menu, click Slide Transition , and work with the options that appear. Hyperlinks to online course: The template contains links to the online version of this training course. The links take you to the hands-on practice session for each lesson and to the Quick Reference Card that is published for this course. Please take note: You must have Outlook 2003 installed to view the hands-on practice sessions. Headers and footers: The template contains a footer that has the course title. You can change or remove the footers in the Header and Footer dialog box (which opens from the View menu).
  • Transcript

    • 1. Microsoft ® Office Outlook ® 2003 Training Control how you send and see e-mail messages Peace River Distributing presents:
    • 2. Course contents <ul><li>Overview: Control view, format, size </li></ul><ul><li>Lesson 1: Choose the right format for sending </li></ul><ul><li>Lesson 2: Control how you see the messages you receive </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Each lesson includes a list of suggested tasks and a set of test questions.
    • 3. <ul><li>The formatting of your e-mail messages is important for many reasons. Message format dictates how text and images are displayed, and even the size of your messages. </li></ul>Overview: Control view, format, size Control how you send and see e-mail messages This course will give you the information you need to choose and control message formats in Microsoft ® Office Outlook ® 2003, both for e-mail messages you send and for those you receive.
    • 4. Course goals <ul><li>Understand the differences between HTML, Rich Text, and Plain Text e-mail message formats. </li></ul><ul><li>Choose the right format for your audience and avoid sending &quot;gobbledygook&quot; or a winmail.dat attachment. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand which format causes attachments to appear inline and which formats show them in the message header. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages (Continued on next slide.)
    • 5. Course goals, cont’d. <ul><li>Know how to change the default format for all messages you send (and even set a different default for messages that go to specific people). </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Control the format used to view messages that are sent to you and understand why some types of pictures and attachments are blocked. </li></ul>
    • 6. Lesson 1 Choose the right format for sending
    • 7. Choose the right format for sending <ul><li>You carefully formatted an e-mail message and sent it to someone over the Internet. </li></ul><ul><li>When she replied, you saw that your text had lost its format, and instead it appeared to be Plain Text with a lot of gobbledygook mixed in. Or, maybe she replied that she couldn't open the &quot;Winmail.dat&quot; file that you sent. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages A message with gobbledygook in it
    • 8. Do they see what you see? <ul><li>Can everyone who gets your e-mail message see your animated signature? </li></ul><ul><li>Do they have the ability to see the inline photo of your dog, or does it appear as a 350 KB attachment (and take forever to download over their slow modem)? </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Before sending a message, consider who will get it.
    • 9. What you have to choose from <ul><li>In Microsoft Outlook, you have three choices for the e-mail message format: </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>HTML (the default) </li></ul><ul><li>Rich Text Format (RTF) </li></ul><ul><li>Plain Text </li></ul>You have three choices for the message format.
    • 10. What you have to choose from <ul><li>If you use a format that your recipients’ e-mail program can't understand, they may not see what you see. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages You have three choices for the message format.
    • 11. What you have to choose from <ul><li>Plain Text format will yield the smallest message size, and HTML messages will be the largest. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages You have three choices for the message format. Each choice also influences a message’s size—and size can affect the amount of time it takes to send or receive a message.
    • 12. HTML: It's on by default <ul><li>Do you receive e-mail messages that look like fancy newsletters? They were probably created using HTML. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages An HTML newsletter sent as an e-mail message HTML is the default message format in Outlook. HTML lets you add style and emphasis to your messages.
    • 13. RTF: Show attachments inline, with caution <ul><li>If you're sending e-mail to people outside your company or if not everyone inside your company uses Outlook, Rich Text Format (RTF) is not the best choice for a message format. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages RTF increases your chances of sending gobbledygook because it's the least compatible of the three available message formats. E-mail message in Rich Text format
    • 14. RTF: Show attachments inline, with caution <ul><li>See the image at left. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>In a Rich Text Format (RTF) message, an attachment appears inline. This allows you to emphasize the point of the attachment. </li></ul><ul><li>In an HTML or Plain Text format message, an attachment appears in the message header. </li></ul>E-mail message in Rich Text format
    • 15. Plain means plain <ul><li>If a message recipient complains about getting gobbledygook when you've sent him an HTML message, try using Plain Text format the next time you send him a message. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages A Plain Text message
    • 16. Plain means plain <ul><li>This means that the recipient of your Plain Text format message will be able to: </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Read your message </li></ul><ul><li>Access your message as quickly as his system will allow </li></ul>A Plain Text message
    • 17. Work outside the default <ul><li>You’ve carefully considered the people who receive most of your e-mail and verified that you're using the right default format for them. </li></ul><ul><li>But what if you want to send a message to someone else using a format other than the default? </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages
    • 18. Work outside the default <ul><li>You can pick a format before you start. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>To create a new message in any of the three available formats, use the Actions menu. </li></ul><ul><li>Click New Mail Message Using on the Actions menu, and select the format of your choice. </li></ul>Here are your options:
    • 19. Work outside the default <ul><li>You can set a new default for a single contact. If you send e-mail to someone with an Internet address (rather than to someone within your company who has an Exchange e-mail account), you can specify the format you'd like to use for that one contact. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Double-click the e-mail name of that person, and select the Internet format option you want. </li></ul>
    • 20. Use Word as your e-mail editor <ul><li>With Word as your e-mail editor, you can use features like AutoCorrect, bullets, numbering, and tables to compose better messages—provided you're using a format that supports them. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages The Mail Format tab of the Options dialog box
    • 21. Use Word as your e-mail editor <ul><li>When you're using the HTML format and Word as your e-mail editor, be aware: Word includes an HTML &quot;filter&quot; that automatically strips out unnecessary HTML elements when you send your e-mail messages. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages The Mail Format tab of the Options dialog box
    • 22. Use Word as your e-mail editor <ul><li>To verify whether Word is selected as your e-mail editor: </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages The Mail Format tab of the Options dialog box <ul><li>In Outlook, on the Tools menu, click Options . </li></ul><ul><li>Click the Mail Format tab. </li></ul><ul><li>Confirm that the Use Microsoft Word to edit e-mail messages check box is selected. </li></ul>
    • 23. Format e-mail replies and forwards <ul><li>Other types of messages that you send are replied to and forwarded messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Although you may not think of these as messages that you create (because someone else started the message), you do have some control over how your replies and forwards look. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Responder’s name in an e-mail message response
    • 24. Format e-mail replies and forwards <ul><li>One option you have in messages that you reply to or forward is to change the look of your comments: </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Here, Nancy has set up Outlook so that her replies appear in dark blue and her name is automatically entered as she makes each comment. </li></ul>Responder’s name in an e-mail message response
    • 25. Suggestions for practice <ul><li>See your default message format and e-mail editor. </li></ul><ul><li>Set the default for a specific contact. </li></ul><ul><li>See how to customize the look of messages you reply to or forward. </li></ul><ul><li>See where to change the default font for Plain Text format messages. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages (Continued on next slide.)
    • 26. Suggestions for practice, cont’d. <ul><li>Create a message that's different from the default. </li></ul><ul><li>Change the message format midstream. </li></ul><ul><li>Add an attachment and compare HTML and RTF formats. </li></ul><ul><li>Restore your settings. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Online practice (requires Outlook 2003)
    • 27. Test 1, question 1 <ul><li>When you specify a default format on the Mail Format tab of the Options dialog box, that's the format that you'll be forced to use for all messages you send. (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>True. </li></ul><ul><li>False. </li></ul>
    • 28. Test 1, question 1: Answer <ul><li>False. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages It's the default, but you can always switch to one of the other formats.
    • 29. Test 1, question 2 <ul><li>Which of the following formats will yield the smallest file size? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Plain Text. </li></ul><ul><li>Rich Text. </li></ul><ul><li>HTML. </li></ul>
    • 30. Test 1, question 2: Answer <ul><li>Plain Text. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages If small is what you want, Plain Text format is your choice.
    • 31. Test 1, question 3 <ul><li>You send a friend a snazzy message with an attachment over the Internet. The friend replies that the message contained a Winmail.dat file and that she could not open it. Which e-mail format is most likely to cause this scenario? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Plain Text. </li></ul><ul><li>Rich Text. </li></ul><ul><li>HTML. </li></ul>
    • 32. Test 1, question 3: Answer <ul><li>Rich Text. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages If you use Rich Text format to send a message to someone who doesn't also use Outlook, the message may be accompanied by a file called Winmail.dat, the contents of which won't make sense to him.
    • 33. Test 1, question 4 <ul><li>Which format type will show attachments inline with the message text? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>HTML. </li></ul><ul><li>Rich Text. </li></ul><ul><li>Plain Text. </li></ul>
    • 34. Test 1, question 4: Answer <ul><li>Rich Text. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages If you want your attachments to appear inline, you need to use RTF. Be sure that the recipient is using an e-mail program that understands RTF. Otherwise, she may see gobbledygook instead of the attachment that you intended.
    • 35. Lesson 2 Control how you see the messages you receive
    • 36. Control how you see messages you receive <ul><li>Do you wonder why you sometimes see red Xs in your messages instead of pictures? The Xs are related to message format, too. </li></ul><ul><li>Do you wish you could choose whether to see formatting in messages, or read them only in Plain Text format? You can! </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Think about the messages you receive.
    • 37. The sender sets the format <ul><li>Now you know you can choose among formats when you send messages. </li></ul><ul><li>But what about controlling the format of messages that you receive ? What are the choices and defaults for those? </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Wondering how to manage message formats?
    • 38. The sender sets the format <ul><li>By default, you see messages the way they were sent, which means that the sender controls the message format. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Wondering how to manage message formats? You'll be glad to know that Outlook gives you some control over how you see a received message, regardless of its original format.
    • 39. Blocked attachments: It's about security <ul><li>Does the message in the picture look familiar? It’s a message about a blocked attachment. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages A received message with a blocked attachment Outlook automatically blocks certain types of attachments. This blocking helps protect your computer from viruses and cannot be changed.
    • 40. Pictures and privacy in HTML messages <ul><li>Have you ever received a message that had red Xs like the ones in the picture? One reason for the red Xs is that Outlook purposely blocks certain types of pictures in HTML-formatted messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Why does Outlook do this? </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages E-mail message with blocked pictures
    • 41. Pictures and privacy in HTML messages <ul><li>HTML has the potential to carry pictures that may do either of the following: </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Invade your privacy (by alerting the sender to the fact that you downloaded the picture and therefore opened the message) </li></ul><ul><li>Irritate or even offend you (unwanted photos or advertisements may appear in the reading or message pane) </li></ul>E-mail message with blocked pictures
    • 42. Pictures and privacy in HTML messages <ul><li>You can also view the pictures right away. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Click the text at the top of the message. </li></ul><ul><li>Click Download Pictures . </li></ul><ul><li>If you always want to see pictures from this sender, select one of the commands. </li></ul><ul><li>A red X indicates that a picture has been blocked. </li></ul>E-mail message with blocked pictures
    • 43. Play it safe with Plain Text format <ul><li>Although HTML offers some great safety features, you can play it safer yet with Plain Text format. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Just as Plain Text format is the simplest and least cumbersome format you can choose for sending a message, it also simplifies things with messages you receive. Plain Text message with menu to view as HTML
    • 44. Play it safe with Plain Text format <ul><li>If you opt for Plain Text as your initial &quot;receive&quot; format, there are a couple things you should keep in mind: </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>When you reply to or forward a message that you've viewed this way, the format of that message will also be Plain Text. </li></ul><ul><li>This setting will not reduce the size of a received message, the way it does a sent or forwarded message. </li></ul>Plain Text message with menu to view as HTML
    • 45. Suggestions for practice <ul><li>Select the Plain Text option for reading e-mail messages. </li></ul><ul><li>Send yourself a glitzy message. </li></ul><ul><li>Open the message. </li></ul><ul><li>Clear the Plain Text option for reading e-mail. </li></ul><ul><li>See where to change settings for downloaded pictures. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Online practice (requires Outlook 2003)
    • 46. Test 2, question 1 <ul><li>You receive an e-mail message with a red X in it. What's the most likely cause? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>It's probably a glitch in the e-mail server. </li></ul><ul><li>Outlook prevented pictures from being downloaded. </li></ul><ul><li>The picture is too big to display in an e-mail message. </li></ul>
    • 47. Test 2, question 1: Answer <ul><li>Outlook prevented pictures from being downloaded. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages If you trust the sender and want to see the pictures in the e-mail message, click the InfoBar at the top of the message, and then click Download Pictures.
    • 48. Test 2, question 2 <ul><li>Which of the following is the main advantage of reading e-mail in Plain Text? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>It's safe. </li></ul><ul><li>It can help you conserve disk space. </li></ul><ul><li>You won't have to bother with attachments. </li></ul>
    • 49. Test 2, question 2: Answer <ul><li>It's safe. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages
    • 50. Test 2, question 3 <ul><li>You received an e-mail message and it says that the attachment was blocked. What are your options? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>Tell the sender. </li></ul><ul><li>You don't have any. Blocked means blocked. </li></ul><ul><li>Change the message format to RTF. </li></ul>
    • 51. Test 2, question 3: Answer <ul><li>Tell the sender. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages Tell the sender that the attachment is a type that was blocked automatically by Outlook. The sender will need to take a few extra steps before sending the attachment, but the good news is that with a few extra steps, the sender should be able to get the file to you. For more information, see the &quot;Useful links&quot; section in the Quick Reference Card.
    • 52. Test 2, question 4 <ul><li>Suppose you're using the HTML default format for sending messages. Which format will be used for messages you receive? (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>HTML. </li></ul><ul><li>RTF. </li></ul><ul><li>Whatever format the sender used. </li></ul>
    • 53. Test 2, question 4: Answer <ul><li>Whatever format the sender used. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages A sender chooses the format of the sent message. If it's sent as Plain Text, that's how you'll receive it. If you want to use something different in a reply or forward, you'll need to take action to do that.
    • 54. Test 2, question 5 <ul><li>In Outlook, it's possible to view all your received messages in Plain Text format. (Pick one answer.) </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages <ul><li>True. </li></ul><ul><li>False. </li></ul>
    • 55. Test 2, question 5: Answer <ul><li>True. </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages To see the message in the format that the sender used, select that option in the InfoBar at the top of the message.
    • 56. Quick Reference Card <ul><li>For a summary of the tasks covered in this course, view the Quick Reference Card . </li></ul>Control how you send and see e-mail messages
    • 57. USING THIS TEMPLATE See the notes pane or view the full notes page (View menu) for detailed help on this template.

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