Are Friends a Dime a Dozen? Establishing Social Media M&E
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Are Friends a Dime a Dozen? Establishing Social Media M&E

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  • If you don’t know where you’re going, how are you gonna’ know when you get there?–Yogi BerraSpecific – state in concrete, detailed and well‐defined terms – What exactly are we going to do for whom? Measurable – should be quantifiable and the source of measurement has been identified. Attainable/Achievable – can the objective be achieved in the proposed time frame with the resources available? Relevant/Realistic – is the objective directly related to the overarching communication goal from your communication plan? Time‐bound – have deadlines been set?M&E is a continuous process that occurs throughout the life of a program. To be most effective, M&E should be planned at the design stage of a program, with the time, money, and personnel that will be required calculated and allocated in advance. Monitoring should be conducted at every stage of the program, with data collected, analyzed, and used on a continuous basis.  Monitoring should be conducted at every stage of the program, with data collected, analyzed, and used on a continuous basis.  Every project or intervention should have a monitoring and evaluation (M&E) plan. This is the fundamental document that details a program’s objectives, the interventions developed to achieve these objectives, and describes the procedures that will be implemented to determine whether or not the objectives are met. It shows how the expected results of a program relate to its goals and objectives, describes the data needed and how these data will be collected and analyzed, how this information will be used, the resources that will be needed, and how the program will be accountable to stakeholders. M&E plans should be created during the design phase of a program and can be organized in a variety of ways. Typically, they include: The underlying assumptions on which the achievement of program goals depend; The anticipated relationships between activities, outputs, and outcomes; Well-defined conceptual measures and definitions, along with baseline values; The monitoring schedule; A list of data sources to be used; Cost estimates for the M&E activities; A list of the partnerships and collaborations that will help achieve the desired results; A plan for the dissemination and utilization of the information gainedFrameworks are key elements of M&E plans that depict the components of a project and the sequence of steps needed to achieve the desired outcomes. They help increase understanding of the program's goals and objectives, define the relationships between factors key to implementation, and delineate the internal and external elements that could affect its success. They are crucial for understanding and analyzing how a program is supposed to work.
  • M&E Plan Components: Indicators Indicators are clues, signs or markers that measure one aspect of a program and show how close a program is to its desired path and outcomes. They are used to provide benchmarks for demonstrating the achievements of a program.One of the most critical steps in designing an M&E system is selecting appropriate indicators. The M&E plan should include descriptions of the indicators that will be used to monitor program implementation and achievement of the goals and objectives.An indicator is a variable that measures one aspect of a program or project that is directly related to the program’s objectives. Monitoring should be conducted at every stage of the program, with data collected, analyzed, and used on a continuous basis.  Throughout the data collection process it is essential that data quality be monitored and maintained. Data quality is important to consider when determining the usefulness of various data sources; the data collected are most useful when they are of the highest quality. It is important to use the highest quality data that are obtainable, but this often requires a trade off with what it is feasible to obtain. The highest quality data are usually obtained through the triangulation of data from several sources. It is also important to remember that behavioral and motivational factors on the part of the people collecting and analyzing the data can also affect its quality.How the information gathered will be stored, disseminated, and used should be defined at the planning stage of the project and described in the M&E plan. This will help ensure that findings from M&E efforts are not wasted because they are not shared. Here are some data quality issues to consider:Coverage: Will the data cover all of the elements of interest?Completeness: Is there a complete set of data for each element of interest?Accuracy: Have the instruments been tested to ensure validity and reliability of the data?Frequency: Are the data collected as frequently as needed?Reporting Schedule: Do the available data reflect the time periods of interest?Accessibility: Are the data needed collectable/retrievable?Power: Is the sample size big enough to provide a stable estimate or detect change?
  • Step 1: The first step in social media measurement is to determine what you’re trying to accomplish and how you will approach it.Step 2: Determine how you will measure success. Metrics development should follow the same process. First, determine how you will measure success from an organizational perspective – whether it is to drive brand/product awareness, source competitive insights, improve search engine placement, or learn from audiences – before you approach it from a social perspective. Step 3: Evaluate your organization’s readiness to measure social media This in one of the most critical elements of social media measurement strategy. Assess your resources, the level of domain, analytical and tool expertise needed, and the current state of internal collaboration. Many organizations lack sufficiently trained staff for social media measurement and delegate it to overcommitted and under-prepared employees. Step 4: Choose tools in light of strategy, metrics, and organization. Once you know what you’re trying to accomplish, how you’ll measure success, and what resources you have available, you’re ready for tool selection. This is still a very new industry, so be aware that tools are as yet immature and change quickly. There is no single best tool for every objective or every organization.
  • Blog:Improve global access to and knowledge of FP/RH services throghout developing countries. We highlight KM products and also share the latest news and insights currenty impacting the global health community. K4Health productsGlobal and public health news and eventsK4Health events, conferences, campaignPartner events and campaignsWays to take action and promote global health worldwideK4Health blogs 2-3 times per week; will amp up as blog redesignedBlogs are the center of our social media strategy. Everything blogged pushed out to all other media RSS feeds to facebook, tweeted, twitter RSS feed to linkIn. Pitched out for cross promotion to other blogsFacebookFacebook most effective opportunity for running campaign– update, revamp, launchDialogue and receive interesting articles from organizations and follows FB Ad on FB: K4Health, photoshare, Drviestraffice to FB page, and photoshareTwitter Use most often when at conferences (e.g. 30-40 tweets and retweets)Target audience for our tweets and followers: Partner organizations, NOT primary organizations; jounalists, communications professionalsThese feed into our linkin accountWe tweet everydayLinkedIn100 followers (closed group)Plan to open group and expand dialogue beyond tweetsRSS feed– automated content for social media tools
  • Blog:Improve global access to and knowledge of FP/RH services throghout developing countries. We highlight KM products and also share the latest news and insights currenty impacting the global health community. K4Health productsGlobal and public health news and eventsK4Health events, conferences, campaignPartner events and campaignsWays to take action and promote global health worldwideK4Health blogs 2-3 times per week; will amp up as blog redesignedBlogs are the center of our social media strategy. Everything blogged pushed out to all other media RSS feeds to facebook, tweeted, twitter RSS feed to linkIn. Pitched out for cross promotion to other blogsFacebookFacebook most effective opportunity for running campaign– update, revamp, launchDialogue and receive interesting articles from organizations and follows FB Ad on FB: K4Health, photoshare, Drvies traffice to FB page, and photoshareTwitter Use most often when at conferences (e.g. 30-40 tweets and retweets)Target audience for our tweets and followers: Partner organizations, NOT primary organizations; jounalists, communications professionalsThese feed into our linkin accountWe tweet everydayLinkedIn100 followers (closed group)Plan to open group and expand dialogue beyond tweetsRSS feed– automated content for social media tools
  • We use these various forms of social media. However, one our biggest promotion tools is cross-promotion. Above is an example of how we cross-posted a blog on the Interagency Youth Working Group site and both K4Health and IYWG tweeted about it.
  • We use a few things to measure our social media. Facebook Insights: Are extremely useful and free measure of your facebook pages. When you are an admin on a facebook page you can see the insights link appear in the top right corner. You can sort by data ranges and it keeps all the historical data as well. Google Analytics: the basic analytics of your sites compared with specific social media campaigns can help see if a particular campaign has led to a spike in your analytics. This is a great measure. For example, our Project Director tweets one a month our top three visited toolkits and we usually see a spike in visits to our site based on that. In order to track these things, it is important to annotate this on your analytics (see next slide). Another great use of Google Analytics is to note the referring sites to see if you are actually getting clicks from one of your social media sites.
  • In order to follow specific events, we place annotations within our google analytics, this allows us to compare specific events in time to spikes or lulls in our analytics. We don’t have to use our memories to remember what was happening on that particular day or that month.
  • This graphic is from google analytics and it shows that we are now back on a upswing in our metrics. We have focused more on our blog writing lately and cross-promotion. We are also able to recognize that our decline was based on a lack of attention to the blog as well as a transition in leadership.
  • Here are some examples of ways to measure your reach with twitter or other social media. They do not need to be expensive, but some measure more impact than just analytics. The challenge is to gauge your impact over time using these different measures. Depending on budget or what your metrics are depends on which service bets fit your situation. The important thing is to have a strategy before you begin doing social media. Twoolr: Just for Tweets, does not do retrospective. So if you do not sign up for it when you start your twitter account you will only know the information from when you start. ($9.90/month or $49/year)Hootsuite: Can be used for any social media: twitter, facebook, linkedIn, Ping.fm, Wordpress, MySpace, Foursquare, and mixi. Free version allows you to organize your posts and schedule future posts. And if you upgrade to pro for $5.99/month you can create custom analytics for all your different social media networks. Tweetreach: shows your reach in terms of the past 50 tweets you have done. So it shows the type of tweet (retweet, @replies, or regular tweets) and how much exposure and impressions your tweets have had. For a full report it costs about $20. Adobe Social Analytics powered by Omniture part of the Adobe Online Marketing Suite:

Are Friends a Dime a Dozen? Establishing Social Media M&E Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Are Friends a Dime a Dozen? Establishing Social Media M&E
    USAID Global Health Mini-University
    Chris Rottler, Forum One Communications
    Tara Sullivan, JHUCCP (K4Health Project)
    Vince Blaser, IAVI
    September 30, 2011
  • 2. Agenda
    New Media 101
    Monitoring & Evaluation 101
    Key Social Media Metrics
    Case Studies (K4Health & IAVI)
    Discussion
  • 3. Key Communication Objectives for Using New Media
    Create awareness of an issue, project, etc.
    Launching a project or major resource
    Establish a need among the right audience
    Comparing projects/services
    Develop or change opinion
    Influence the influencers
    Drive action and traffic among the right audience
    Establish credibility and trust
  • 4. Facilitate information sharing among audience networks
    Expand reach to include more diverse audiences
    Facilitate interactive communication, connection, and public engagement
    Increase the timely dissemination and potential impact of health and safety information
    Promote an organization’s work and results
    Develop strategic communication partnerships
    Raise awareness and advocate for global health issues
    Key (Global Health) Communication Objectives for Using New Media
  • 5. New Media 101
    Note: Presence management framework derived from original work by Chris Brogan
  • 6. Online Presence Framework
    Home Base: Priority 1 (50% of your time budget)
    “Social” portion of your hosted presence
    Outposts: Priority 2 (40% of your time budget)
    Key social sites that you actively participate in
    Passports: Priority 3 (10% of your time budget)
    Profiles on lower priority social sites
    Mostly to listen, occasionally participate
    Note: Presence management framework derived from original work by Chris Brogan
  • 7. Monitoring & Evaluation 101
  • 8. Monitoring & Evaluation 101
  • 9. Key Social Media Metrics
    Step 1 (Strategy): Align your strategy with organization’s objectives
    Step 2 (Metrics): Determine how you will measure success
    Step 3 (Organization): Evaluate your organization’s readiness to measure social media
    Step 4(Technology): Choose tools in light of strategy, metrics, and organizaiton (Etlinger, 2011)
  • 10. Establishing a systematic process
    to collect, analyze, and use social media metrics
    Tara Sullivan, Knowledge Management Director
    Rebecca Shore, Communications Specialist
    Kate Stence, Communications Manager
    Saori Ohkubo, M&E Advisor
  • 11. K4Health Mission
    To increase the use and dissemination of evidence-based, accurate and up-to-date information to improve health service delivery and health outcomes worldwide.
    Make quality health information easy-to-find and easy-to-use
  • 12. K4Health’s Target Audiences
  • 13. K4Health’s Communication Strategy
  • 14. K4Health’s Social Media Objectives
  • 15. Understanding Our Audience
    Environment scan
    Global online survey
    Multi-country qualitative study
    • Methods:
    • 16. Key informant Interviews
    • 17. Network stakeholder interviews
    • 18. Focus group discussions
    • 19. Net-mapping
    • 20. Countries:
    • 21. Malawi, Senegal & India
    • 22. Ethiopia & Peru
    Women participate in a family planning discussion group in India.
    © 1993 Paul Bankerd/CCP, Courtesy of Photoshare.
     
  • 23. Social Media: An Integrated Approach
  • 24. K4Health Blog: Joining the Conversation
    Global Health
    Information & Communication Technology for Development
    Knowledge Management for Health
    Family Planning, Reproductive Health, HIV/AIDS
  • 25. Social Media: An Integrated Approach
  • 26.
  • 27. Key Social Media Metrics
  • 28. Collecting the Data
  • 29. Google Analytics: Annotations
  • 30. Measurable Success
  • 31. Facebook Advertising Campaign
  • 32. Tools to Track Social Media
  • 33. Quality Over Quantity
    M&E lessons from the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative’s new media efforts
    Vince Blaser
    New Media Specialist
    Washington, DC 11th Annual Global Health Mini-University
    9/30/11
  • 34. What is the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI)?
    • IAVI is a global, non-profit, public-private partnership with a mission to ensure the development of safe, effective, accessible, preventive HIV vaccines for use worldwide
    • 35. We work with partners around the world, with HQ in New York and field offices in Africa, Europe and India
    • 36. The bulk IAVI’s funding is spent on R&D for vaccine candidates. We also conduct policy analyses, advocate for the field and engage communities in the trial process and AIDS vaccine education
  • IAVI’s Communication Objectives
    Main Objective: Inform relevant audiences that an AIDS vaccine is possible and vital, and that IAVI’s programs in particular are valuable
    Secondary Objectives:
    • Maintain and increase support for AIDS vaccine development
    • 37. Reinforce IAVI as a “go-to” organization and partner on AIDS vaccine development
    • 38. Raise appropriate awareness of IAVI’s activities and innovations
  • IAVI’s New Media Audit – What We Hoped to Learn
    • What are the major conversations?
    • 39. Average of 400-500 posts on FB and Twitter daily related to our issues, 1,000+ daily during the 2010 International AIDS Conference
    • 40. Key stakeholders were reading global health, AIDS, development and political blogs in addition to traditional news sources
    • 41. What is our audience looking for?
    • 42. Lessons for engagement
  • Findings – What Are the Major Conversations?
    News, news and more news
    @SciDevNet: India, South Africa to team up on HIV vaccine research http://bit.ly/d6sPEx
    Support for HIV vaccine R&D
    @OnlyInterject: Computational Biology @ work! via @AIDSvaccine Determining shape of viral protein could spur #HIVvaccinedev http://bit.ly/bmSgZK#AIDSvax10
    The conspiracies, the misinformed and the sarcastic
    @marshallbock: @naporeon Vaccines cause autism! And AIDS! AIDSTISM!
    @JoziStylista: RT @BeigeTheColour: One would imagine that a small dose of HIV blood is one of the ingredients in the AIDS vaccine...
  • 43. Findings – What is Our Audience Looking For?
    • They’re looking for news
    • 44. They’re looking for inspiration
    • 45. They’re looking to collaborate
    • 46. They’re willing to help spread the word
  • Creating and Evaluating IAVI’s New Media Strategy
    Opportunities
    • To reflect changes in media landscape by placing IAVI spokespeople and partners in key blogs for stakeholders
    • 47. To post the latest on AIDS vaccines and IAVI in social media outlets that are most used by stakeholders and best fit IAVI’s communications objectives
    • 48. To keep a pulse on latest discussions about our field from our major stakeholders as well as general audiences
    Challenges
    • To maintain the organization’s expertise and credibility in the new media space
    • 49. To avoid wasting limited staff time on relatively ineffective new media outlets and conversations not productive toward our mission
    • 50. To focus evaluation of new media strategy on key stakeholder engagement
  • Where We Focus (and Where We Don’t) – Blogs
    Blog placement
    • Scientific blogs (Science Insider, Science Speaks: HIV & TB News)
    • 51. AIDS, global health policy blogs (ONE Campaign Blog, Global Health Magazine Blog)
    • 52. Policy/politics blogs (Huffington Post, MFAN blog, The Hill Congress Blog)
    • 53. Major media blogs (CNN, Guardian Global Health Policy Blog)
    • 54. Development and donor blogs (USAID Impact Blog, Scidev.net)
    • 55. NOTour own blog
  • Where We Focus (and Where We Don’t) – Social Media Outlets
    Twitter (@AIDSvaccine)
    • High emphasis, most staff time and most posts
    Facebook (facebook.com/AIDSvaccine)
    • Second highest emphasis and staff time – most posts and multimedia content related directly to IAVI
    YouTube (IAVIvideos)
    • Time varies by project and goal of videos
    LinkedIN
    • Discussion board and group maintained for purposes of recruiting and informing field of major breakthroughs
    Other outlets
    • Little time spent on MySpace, Flickr. Wait-and-see on new outlets like Google+
  • What We Post About
    IAVI news, announcements and reports
    Developing an #HIV#AIDS#vaccine isn't just science. Check out our brief on IAVI's vaccine preparedness approach http://bit.ly/c5xv7Q
    AIDS vaccine, global health/development news, trends
    Great new resource on CAPRISA #HIV#microbicide trial results & what's next from AVAC (@HIVpxresearch). Check it out! http://bit.ly/aIuepe
    Inspiring quotations and key messages
    New U.S. #MDG plan: "We will pursue breakthroughs in public health across the developing world," incl#HIV#vaccineshttp://bit.ly/bh5TCh
    Major events
    #AIDS2010, what do you know future #HIV prevention choices? Earn your prize at the Global Village Women’s Networking Zone Tue 20th 5:15pm!
    Responses, messages to other posters
    @Ballona: #HIV antibodies discovery is step fwd in developing an effective #AIDS vaccine, but much work remains.
  • 56. How We Evaluate
    Quantitative Methods
    • Website traffic numbers, followers, YouTube views, bit.ly clickthroughs, etc.
    • 57. Volume of discussion on our topic areas that utilizes our information and outreach
    Qualitative methods
    • Feedback from key stakeholders
    • 58. Engagement from key partners
    • 59. Participation in major social media discussions on AIDS vaccine R&D
  • Imagine a world
    withoutAIDS
  • 60.
  • 61. Discussion
    Contact Information:
    Chris Rottler, Forum One Communications
    crottler@forumone.com
    Tara Sullivan, Knowledge for Health
    tsulliva@jhuccp.org
    Vince Blaser, IAVI
    vblaser@iavi.org