Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Andreas Schleicher2009 J Bogota (Innovation And Competitiveness Year)   Rev 1.1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Saving this for later?

Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime - even offline.

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Andreas Schleicher2009 J Bogota (Innovation And Competitiveness Year) Rev 1.1

446
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
446
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
18
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • The pace of change is most clearly visible in college education, and I want to bring two more dimensions into the picture here.Each dot on this chart represents one country. The horizontal axis shows you the college graduation rate, the proportion of an age group that comes out of the system with a college degree. The vertical axis shows you how much it costs to educate a graduate per year.
  • *Lets now add where the money comes from into the picture, the larger the dot, the larger the share of private spending on college education, such as tuition.The chart shows the US as the country with the highest college graduation rate, and the highest level of spending per student. The US is also among the countries with the largest share of resources generated through the private sector. That allows the US to spend roughly twice as much per student as Europe. US, FinlandThe only thing I have not highlighted so far is that this was the situation in 1995. And now watch this closely as you see how this changed between 1995 and 2005.
  • You see that in 2000, five years, later, the picture looked very different. While in 1995 the US was well ahead of any other country – you see that marked by the dotted circle, in 2000 several other countries had reached out to this frontier. Look at Australia, in pink.
  • Thatwasallveryquick, letusgothroughthisdevelopmentonceagain
  • Thatwasallveryquick, letusgothroughthisdevelopmentonceagain
  • That’s all just the beginning. The first, and easy phase of globalisation, the time that the industrialised world only had to compete against the China’s and India’s that offered a low skilled work force at a fraction at our labour costs is long gone. What we now see is, that we no longer compete with low skills at low costs, but that countries like China or India are starting to deliver high skills at low costs at an ever increasing pace. And that’s beginning to challenge the middle and high skills sectors.
  • Clearly, our countries will not compete with this by putting more graduates through schools and universities, it is the nature of skills quality of educational output that really counts. Creativity and innovation are what gives us the competitive edge. Its all about putting new triangles up.If in a global economy, all work that can be digitised, automatised or outsourced will be digitised, automatised or outsourced, then we need to ask ourselves what key competencies education systems need to provide for young people to succeed
  • At the OECD, we are measuring skills, with a focus on those non-routing cognitive skills, regularly through our PISA programme, now the most comprehensive international assessment of the quality of education. Every three years, we test roughly half a million of children in OECD countries in key competencies, and that’s not simply about checking whether students have learned what they were recently taught, but we examine to what extent students can extrapolate from what they have learned and apply their knowledge and skills in novel settings. Here you see the countries which we can compare, and how the set of countries being compared has expanded.
  • International comparisons demonstrate what can be done with a combination of the right strategy and courageous, sustained leadership. Let us look at what’s behind the success of some of these countries.
  • Transcript

    • 1. No hay dóndeesconderse
      El "global talent pool" ha cambiado
      Unamirada a la oferta y demanda de habilidades
    • 2. Supply and demand for youngindividuals(25-34 year-olds) to skilled jobs, 1998-2006
      Difference in the proportion of 25-34 year-olds and 45-54 year-old cohort with below tertiary education in skilled jobs
      Slowing demand for higher educated individuals; Preference towards younger individuals over older with below tertiary education
      Increasing demand for higher educated individuals; Employers have fewer choices and must take younger, less educated workers to fill skilled positions
      Slowing demand for higher educated individuals; Preference towards older individuals (experience) over younger with below tertiary education
      Increasing demand for higher educated individuals; Demand tends to be satisfied by existing pool of individuals with tertiary education
      older Advantage for lower-educated younger
      Slowing Demand for higher-educated Growing
      A1.5
      Percentage point change in the proportion of 25-34 year-olds with tertiary education in skilled jobs between 2006 and 1998
    • 3. „The world is flat“ (Thomas Friedman)
    • 4. Terminación del bachilleratoCambios mundiales en los resultados globales de la educaciónPorcentajes aproximados de personas con grado de bachiller o equivalente por grupos de edad de 55-64, 45-55, 45-44 y 25-34
      %
      1
      13
      1
      27
      1. Excluding ISCED 3C short programmes 2. Year of reference 2004
      3. Including some ISCED 3C short programmes 3. Year of reference 2003.
    • 5. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Costoporalumno
      Oferta de posgrado
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 6. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      United States
      Costoporalumno
      Finland
      Oferta de posgrado
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 7. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Finland
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 8. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 9. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 10. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 11. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 12. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 13. Un mundo de cambio – Educaciónuniversitaria
      Expenditure per student at tertiary level (USD)
      United States
      Finland
      Tertiary-type A graduation rate
    • 14. The world is flat (Thomas Friedman)
    • 15. MetascambiantesOfertafutura de graduados de secundaria
    • 16. Ofertafutura de graduados de secundaria
      Ofertafutura de graduadosuniversitarios
    • 17. The world is flat (Thomas Friedman)
    • 18. Cómoestácambiando la demanda de competencias (US)
      Aporte medide tareascomopercentil de la distribución de tareas de 1960
      (Levy y Murnane)
    • 19. La escolarización en la era industrial:
      Educarpara la disciplina
    • 20. Los desafíosactuales:
      Ciudadanosmotivados y autosuficientes.
      Empresariosqueasumenriesgos, profesionesconvergentes y continuamenteemergentesrelacionadas con contextos de globalización y avancestecnológicos
    • 21. OECD’s PISA assessment of the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds
      Coverage of world economy
      83%
      77%
      81%
      85%
      86%
      87%
    • 22. Decidir qué evaluar...
      mirando al pasado: qué se espera que los estudiantes hayan aprendido
      …o…
      mirando al futuro: con qué éxito pueden extrapolar lo que han aprendido y aplicar sus conocimientos y habilidades en nuevos contextos
      Para PISA, los países de la OCDE han elegido el segundo planteamiento.
    • 23. Competencia matemática en PISA
      El mundo real
      El mundo de las matemáticas
      Hacer el problema susceptible de tratamiento matemático
      Un modelo matemático
      Un modelo de la realidad
      Comprender, estructurar y simplificar la situación
      Emplear las herramientas matemáticas apropiadas para resolver el problema
      Una situación real
      Validar los resultados
      Resultados matemáticos
      Resultados reales
      Interpretar los resultados matemáticos
    • 24. Alto rendimiento en ciencias
      Rendimientomedio de los alumnos de 15 años en ciencias – extrapolar y aplicar
      Bajo rendimiento en ciencias
    • 25. Desempeño alto en ciencias
      Desempeño promedio de alumnos de 15 años – extrapolar y aplicar
      Desempeño promedio alto
      Disparidades socioeconómicas pequeñas
      Desempeño promedio alto
      Disparidades socioeconómicas grandes
      Fuerte impacto de las condiciones socioeconómicas sobre el rendimiento del alumno
      Distribución de las oportunidades de aprendizaje socialmente equitativa
      Desempeño promedio bajo
      Disparidades socioeconómicas grandes
      Desempeño promedio bajo
      Disparidades socioeconómicas pequeñas
      Desempeño bajo en ciencias
    • 26. Desempeño alto en ciencias
      Desempeño promedio de alumnos de 15 años – extrapolar y aplicar
      Desempeño promedio alto
      Disparidades socioeconómicas pequeñas
      Desempeño promedio alto
      Disparidades socioeconómicas grandes
      Fuerte impacto de las condiciones socioeconómicas sobre el rendimiento del alumno
      Distribución de las oportunidades de aprendizaje socialmente equitativa
      Desempeño promedio bajo
      Disparidades socioeconómicas grandes
      Desempeño promedio bajo
      Disparidades socioeconómicas pequeñas
      Desempeño bajo en ciencias
    • 27. How to get there
      Some policy levers that emerge from international comparisons
    • 28. Money matters - but other things do too
    • 29. Contribution of various factors to salary cost per upper secondary student as a percentage of GDP per capita (2006)
      Percentage points
      B7.1
    • 30. Altas expectativas y estándares universales
      Acceso al desarrollo profesional de mejor calidad
    • 31. Retos y apoyos
      Fuerte apoyo
      Rendimientobajo
      Mejorasparciales
      Rendimientoelevado
      Mejorasistemática
      Bajo nivel de reto
      Alto nivel de reto
      Rendimiento bajo
      Ausencia de cambios
      Conflicto
      Desmoralización
      Escaso apoyo
    • 32. Alta ambición
      Responsabilidad en desarrollo. El colegio como centro de acción
      Responsabilidad de centro e intervencionismo, en porporción inversa para alcanzar el éxito
      Acceso al desarrollo profesional de mejor calidad
    • 33. Conjunto de datos internacionales: consecuencias de ciertos factores del centro y del sistema en el rendimiento en ciencias tras tomar en consideración todos los otros factores del modelo
      Evaluaciónpositiva de los directores de escuela con respecto a la calidad de materialeseducativos(bruto)
      Escuelas con másescuelascompetidores(bruto)
      Escuelas con mayor autonomía (recursos)(bruto y neto)
      Actividadesescolaresparapromover el aprendizaje de lasciencias(bruto y neto)
      Unahoraadicional de estudio en solitario o de tarea(bruto y neto)
      Unahoraadicional de aprendizaje de lasciencias en la escuela(bruto y neto)
      Resultadosescolarespublicados (bruto y neto)
      Escuelasacademicamenteselectivas (bruto y neto) pero sin efecto a nivelsistema
      Escuelaspracticantes de agrupamientoporhabilidades (bruto y neto)
      Unahoraadicional de leccionesfuera de la escuela (bruto y neto)
      20
      Cada 10% adicional de financiamientopúblico(bruto)
      Percepción de los directores de escuelas de que la falta de maestros calificadosperjudica la instrucción (bruto)
      Efectotrasconsiderar el perfilsocioeconómico de los estudiantes, de lasescuelas y de los paises
      Efectomedido
      OECD (2007), PISA 2006 – Science Competencies from Tomorrow’s World, Table 6.1a
    • 34. Altas ambiciones
      La escuela como centro de acción: devolución de responsabilidad
      Oportunidades educativas integradas
      Pasar de sistemas de enseñanza y evaluación prescritos a un aprendizaje personalizado
      Accountability
      Acceso a un desarrollo profesional de calidad
    • 35. High science performance
      Durchschnittliche Schülerleistungen im Bereich Mathematik
      High average performance
      Large socio-economic disparities
      High average performance
      High social equity
      Strong socio-economic impact on student performance
      Socially equitable distribution of learning opportunities
      Selección temprana y diferencia institucional
      Alto nivel de estratificación
      Bajo nivel de estratificación
      Low average performance
      Large socio-economic disparities
      Low average performance
      High social equity
      Low science performance
    • 36. La calidad de un sistema educativo nopuede exceder la calidad de sus maestros
      El futuro de los sistemas educativos debe ser rico en conocimiento
      Criterio profesional informado; el profesor es un “ trabajador del conocimiento”
      Prescripción informada
      Prescripción nacional
      Criterio profesional
      Prescripción no informada; el profesor se limita a implementar el curriculum
      Criterio profesional no informado
      Los sistemas educativos tradicionalmente han sido pobres en conocimiento
    • 37. ¿Porquépreocuparse?
      Progreso
      Preocupaciónporlascompetenciasnecesariaspara el crecimientoeconómico, la mejora de la productividad y lastasas de innovacióntecnológica
      Un añomás de educaciónsupone entre el 3% y el 6% del PIB
      El incremento en lascualificacionesuniversitarias no parecehaberproducidouna “inflación” del valor de mercado de lascualificaciones(en 17 de los 20 países con datosdisponibles, los ingresosaumentaron entre 1997 y 2003; en Alemania, Italia y Hungríaaumentaron entre un 20% y un 40%)
      Justicia
      Preocupaciónpor el papel de lascompetencias en la generación de desigualdad social y en el resultadoeconómico
      Tanto la destreza media como la distribución de destrezas son importantes en el crecimiento a largo plazo
      Rentabilidad
      Preocupaciónpor la demanda, la eficiencia, y la efectividad de la inversión en bienespúblicos
    • 38. www.oecd.org; www.pisa.oecd.org
      All national and international publications
      The complete micro-level database
      email: pisa@oecd.org
      Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org
      … and remember:
      Without data, you are just another person with an opinion
      Thank you !