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Year 10 GCSE English Language Induction
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Year 10 GCSE English Language Induction

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Year 9 into year 10 induction activity

Year 9 into year 10 induction activity

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  • Students using mini whiteboards, punctuate the sentences. Teachers targets to ask for justification and corrects misconceptions. Teacher could also point out how the sentences start in different ways, linking to the learning in the previous lesson.
  • What sort of original writing have you read – what novels, autobiographies, articles etc? What are they like – why are they effective? Here is an extract from a particularly good piece of writing. It is creative, descriptive, funny and powerful. If you have read it before…remember being practically able to smell that burnt toast with lines like
  • The following 3 slides support learners who may need teacher intervention with improving their sentences for effectiveness and variety. Students follow on with improving their writing.

Year 10 GCSE English Language Induction Year 10 GCSE English Language Induction Presentation Transcript

  • Sentence Structure and Vocabulary Learning objectives: To make effective language choices To vary sentences for effect
  • Word classes Match these word classes up to the correct definition: • Word Class Definition • Noun A word which “places” a noun • Adjective A doing or action word • Verb A word which avoids repeating a name • Adverb A word that describes a noun • Pronouns A person, place or thing • Prepositions A word that describes a verb
  • TASK 2: • Copy this list of words and fill in the word class each belongs to: Word Class • Blue • Run • Carefully • Chair • Shout • Shiny • Old • Dictionary • Cautiously • Book • Slide • Beneath • We
  • Establishing setting – showing not telling • Look at the following picture • Think about the context of the picture – 5Ws • Think about the senses in relation to the picture – what could you smell? See? Hear? Taste? Touch? Extension thinking: Which genre of writing would you associate this picture with and why?
  • Adjective Noun Verb Adverb Smokey Fire Forest Raged Fiercely
  • Over to you… Your challenge is to write a paragraph of between 40 and 50 words, starting with this sentence: The fire raged fiercely through the forest…
  • Success Criteria
  • Peer Review • Swap your writing with your peer partner • Read through their draft writing and identify the correct use of effective descriptive writing techniques 2 Ticks and a Wish: • Identify 2 strong adjectives and adverbs that they have used which help to create vivid imagery. • Identify one thing they need to do to improve the quality of writing
  • For teachers • The following 4/5 slides can be used as extension activities for more able groups or could be used for the start of the following lesson
  • Changing the order of sentences… Have a go at ordering the sentences in front of you…
  • Starting with a verb (ing) • The boy was sitting in the chair as he thought about his life. • Sitting in the chair, the boy thought back upon his life
  • Have a go…  She jumped in fear and screamed loudly Now a difficult one:  The man hurried along the road, while carsThe man hurried along the road, while cars streamed past him, his desperation growing.streamed past him, his desperation growing.  HurryingHurrying desperately, the man ran along the road,desperately, the man ran along the road, as cars streamed past him.as cars streamed past him.
  • Starting with an adverb… The detective hurried anxiously through the rain-swept streets. Anxiously, the detective hurried through the rain-swept streets
  • Now have a go… • The lady walked nervously towards the mysterious shop. • The tiger crept silently towards his prey.
  • Other tips… • Short sentences can add tension and suspense There was a piercing scream in the distance before it went quiet. Too quiet. • Punctuation can be used for effect: ! Shouting … cliff hangar ; - longer pause than a comma
  • Plenary • Look back at your piece of description of the fire. Can you now improve it? Focus on: - using precise and interesting vocabulary - starting a sentence differently - using short sentences for effect - experimenting with punctuation Use a different colour pen to make the changes.
  • Original Writing To do a dull thing with style is preferable to doing a dangerous thing without it
  • Learning Objective • Understand and use effective techniques for Original Writing in order to aspire to gain C or above • AO3i communicate clearly and imaginatively, using and adapting forms for different readers and purposes • AO3ii organise ideas into sentences, paragraphs and whole texts • AO3iii use a range of sentence structures effectively with accurate punctuation and spelling
  • Put the correct punctuation into these sentences: • The green misty glass was lying on the floor shining dangerously. • Laying carelessly on the floor the shattered glass was shining. • Carelessly the shattered glass lay on the floor.
  • The ‘dull’ things • You cannot brush past the little details when writing – the following mark the difference between getting a C and missing it by a mile. • Sentence punctuation • Spellings • Grammar • Sentence construction and variation • Paragraphing • Editing for effect
  • Toast ‘My mother burns the toast as surely as the sun rises each morning. In fact, I doubt if she has ever made a round of toast in her life that failed to fill the kitchen with plumes of throat- catching smoke. I am nine now and I have never seen butter without black bits in it.’ Now it’s your turn… You will be writing a piece of GCSE coursework that must be completely ‘original’.
  • Snippets • In order to get some inspiration, we will be doing little snippets of a range of possibilities for your piece of original writing. • You can then decide which piece of writing you want to develop into a full piece. • The good news is you’ve probably already done some types of writing before in your previous English lessons – persuading, informing, explaining, describing? Can you recall any?
  • Taking risks To do a dangerous thing with style is what I call art
  • Taking risks and adding ‘danger’ • No matter which task you are approaching, there are some risks you have to take… • Powerful adjectives allow your writing to grab your reader. Don’t tell me what I already know, grass is green, the sky is blue and the sun is bright, take a risk, tell me what I don’t know.
  • Style • Imagery can also be created by using similes and metaphors. As pure as snow or you are the sun in my sky. • Setting is the key to creating a mood – use the weather – like a raincloud following Eeyore around from Winnie the Pooh – you can use a storm to reflect trouble approaching or sunshine for a happy ending. This is called ‘pathetic fallacy’ and is very effective. • Setting can also be the surroundings The ramshackle house creaked in the wind or the time of day, year or season. • Characterisation: whether you’re describing real people or imaginary, you need to paint them in an interesting way so the reader becomes their friend (or enemy!). His heart was black and withered with evil deeds.
  • Identify the ‘dull’ – remember last lesson? There are many ways of using language to create an effective description. Take a simple sentence: The trees moved in the breeze. You can add style by: Step 1 Identifying the nouns and verbs in the sentence Step 2 Select TWO adjectives to go in front of each noun Step 3 Select ONE adverb to go in front of the verb
  • This time with ‘style’ adding adjectives: The tall, willowy trees gently moved in the soft whispering breeze Changing the verb and adding an adverb: The trees swayed rhythmically in the breeze By using a simile to help describe: The trees moved in the breeze like sails over the water. Practise your own using: The cat sat on the mat
  • Snippet One • Chocs! • Lets begin with the dull • List all the ‘nouns’ you can see • Obvious nouns • Chocolate • Wrapper
  • Snippet One • Adding style • Think of some adjectives to describe these chocolates… • Now pick one out of the tin… • Firstly, find some adjectives to describe the way the wrapper looks… • Now rustle it and describe the sounds…
  • Chocs • Now describe how the wrapper feels between your fingers… • Open it and… • Sniff it! Describe the smell and its effect on you. • Finally… • Munch it! Describe the explosion of flavour in your mouth.
  • Chocs • Now use a thesaurus to see if you can improve on any of your adjectives. • Once you have done this, try to use it all to create an opening paragraph of a piece of description. • Is it a quiet night in and you have the box all to yourself? • Have you sneaked around and found your mum’s secret stash? • Have you stolen the chocolates from someone?
  • Chocs As the pale moonlight crept through a chink in the curtains I stole across the midnight living room to find a pocket of heaven. Like a cunning thief I gently reached behind my mum’s chair, sweaty fingers eager for their treasure. I gingerly lifted the lid like a woman opens a jewellery box given to her at Christmas. The waft of loveliness hit my nostrils and the dribbling began; I had to have one.
  • Self assessment: technique check • What sentence and structural techniques were included in the last example? How is tension built? What made it good and could it be improved? • Sentence construction: how are the sentences begun? How else could you start a sentence? Practice different ways that do not begin with ‘the’ ‘I’ or ‘A’.
  • ‘Dull’ Sentences? Try this! • a preposition : Prepositions indicate time, position or direction. • in under before outside up along beyond below at opposite nearby by with during while e.g. In the aircraft … • a verb ending in –ing : Verbs are words that express an action, a happening, a process or a state. Verbs ending in –ing indicate continuous action. hoping running strolling galloping sneering laughing smiling fearing peering fearing e.g. Feeling angry, Matt ran forward … • a verb ending in –ed : Verbs are words that express an action, a happening, a process or a state. Verbs ending in –ed indicate the past tense. exhausted scared tired invigorated placed heated opened packed irritated draped cluttered e.g. Frightened, I ran through the trees
  • Boring Sentences? Try this! • an adverb, (-ly words) : Adverbs provide more information about the verb (i.e. how the action is done). silently noisily helpfully interestingly hopefully expectantly frighteningly unhappily slowly e.g. Instantly the dogs jumped … • a connective : Connectives are words or phrases that link clauses or sentences meanwhile although despite consequently likewise similarly however finally furthermore e.g. Meanwhile, he backed away from her, worried about her intentions… • A subordinate clause : a secondary part of the sentence that does not make sense on its own (usually we put at end of sentence because we think that way) What do you notice about subordinate clauses? e.g. Because he was tired, the cat lay on the mat e.g Looking for signs of life, the man walked on the moon.
  • Technique Definition Examples Preposition Prepositions indicate time, position or direction. in under before outside up along beyond below at opposite nearby by with during while Verb ending in -ing Verbs are words that express an action, a happening, a process or a state. Verbs ending in –ing indicate continuous action. hoping running strolling galloping sneering laughing smiling fearing peering fearing Verb ending in -ed Verbs are words that express an action, a happening, a process or a state. Verbs ending in –ed indicate the past tense. exhausted scared tired invigorated placed heated opened packed irritated draped cluttered Adverb usually ends -ly Adverbs provide more information about the verb (i.e. how the action is done). silently noisily helpfully interestingly hopefully expectantly frighteningly unhappily slowly Connective Connectives are words or phrases that link clauses or sentences. meanwhile although despite consequently likewise similarly however finally furthermore Subordinate clause a secondary part of the sentence that does not make sense on its own (usually we put at end of sentence because we think that way) Because he was tired, the cat lay on the mat Looking for signs of life, the man walked on the moon
  • Plenary – reflection on your writing For each of the criteria below, give an example from your partner’s writing: •(AO3i ) Has you partner communicated clearly and imaginatively? Did they use powerful descriptive adjectives and/or adverbs? Did they use any similes or metaphors? Did they appeal to the senses? •(AO3ii ) Did they organise ideas into sentences? Paragraphs? Did they use any linking connectives between paragraphs to signal the development of their ideas? •(AO3iii ) Did they use a mix of simple, compound and complex sentences? Did they use punctuation accurately? Did they spell new vocabulary accurately?
  • Summer holiday homework • Over the holiday produce a final, neat version of your descriptive writing about the piece of chocolate. • It can be presented in any format you like – typed, handwritten or artistically. • Look at your partner’s marking to see where you need to improve your draft work. • Bring it to your first English lesson next term. • There will be prizes available for the most imaginative and creative responses.