Women2004updated

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  • As of December 2003, 5,208 adolescents (persons aged 13-19 years) have been reported with AIDS. In earlier years, most reported cases were in adolescent males; over time, the male-to-female ratio has decreased. In 2003, 472 adolescents were reported with AIDS; of these, 256 (54%) were male and 216 (46%) were female.
    Speaker again illustrates the rise of AIDS in just one year.
  • From 1985 through 2004, 5,593 adolescents (persons aged 13-19 years) were reported with AIDS. In earlier years, most reported cases were in adolescent males; over time, the male-to-female ratio has decreased. In 2004, 418 adolescents were reported with AIDS; of these, 238 (57%) were male and 180 (43%) were female.
  • As of December 2003, a total of 31,646 young adults aged 20 to 24 years were reported with AIDS; most were male. In 1985, 89% of cases reported in young adults 20 to 24 years old were in males. However, as heterosexual contact has accounted for an increasing proportion of HIV infections, particularly in females, the proportion of AIDS cases reported in females has increased. In 2003, 36% of the 1,710 cases reported were in females.
    Speaker again illustrates the rise in AIDS cases for the following year.
  • From 1985 through 2004, a total of 32,757 young adults aged 20 to 24 years were reported with AIDS; most were male. In 1985, 89% of cases reported in young adults 20 to 24 years old were in males. However, as heterosexual contact has accounted for an increasing proportion of HIV infections, particularly in females, the proportion of AIDS cases reported in females has increased. In 2004, 33% of the 1,807 cases reported were in females.
  • Cumulative through December 2003, a total of 221,065 persons with HIV infection (not AIDS) had been reported from the 41 areas with confidential name-based HIV infection surveillance; 67% of these persons were aged 25-44 years at the time of diagnosis.
    In 2003, 41 areas (including 35 states, US dependencies, possessions, and associated nations) conducted HIV case surveillance and reported cases of HIV infection in adults, adolescents, and children to CDC. Connecticut reported only pediatric HIV cases.
  • Through 2003, a total of 902,223 persons with AIDS were reported. Persons between the ages of 25-44 years accounted for 73% of all reported cases.
  • CDC estimates that 68% of the 10,955 AIDS cases diagnosed among female adults and adolescents in 2002 can be attributed to heterosexual transmission: 15% of these cases are from heterosexual contact with an injection drug user and 53% from sexual contact with high-risk partners such as bisexual men or HIV-infected men with unspecified risks.
    Of the cases in female adults and adolescents, 29% were attributed to injection drug use and 3% to other or unidentified risks.
    Data for this slide were statistically adjusted for reporting delays and redistribution of cases initially reported without risk.
  • In 2003, of HIV/AIDS cases diagnosed among male adults and adolescents in 33 areas with confidential name-based HIV infection surveillance, 63% were attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and 14% were attributed to injection drug use. Approximately 17% of cases were attributed to heterosexual contact and 5% attributed to male-to-male sexual contact and injection drug use.
    Most (79%) of the HIV/AIDS cases diagnosed among female adults and adolescents were attributed to heterosexual contact, and 19% were attributed to injection drug use.
    The following 33 areas have had laws or regulations requiring confidential name-based HIV infection reporting since at least 1999: Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, Wyoming, and the US Virgin Islands.
    The data have been adjusted for reporting delays and estimated proportional redistribution of cases in persons initially reported without an identified risk factor.
  • Speaker defines HIV and AIDS
  • Speaker defines how HIV effects the immune system and how the virus progresses to AIDS.
  • Speaker discusses the modes of transmission as well as myth busting.
  • Speaker discusses how HIV can affect the body’s immune system.
    An HIV positive speaker describes her/his experience with HIV and having to deal with Opportunistic Infections.
  • Speaker discusses how HIV can affect the body’s immune system.
    An HIV positive speaker describes her/his experience with HIV and having to deal with Opportunistic Infections.
  • Speaker and HIV positive speaker also discusses the amount of medications a person might take as well as the side effects.
    HIV positive speaker show his/her amount of pills and discusses her daily side effects.
  • HIV positive speaker show his/her amount of pills and discusses her daily side effects.
  • HIV positive speaker show his/her amount of pills and discusses her daily side effects.
  • Speaker and HIV positive speaker discusses poverty, SSI payment in connection to HIV.
  • Methods of prevention.
    Speakers discuss the importance of communication with partners about HIV but also with friends and family. Communication is also discussed as a part of learning.
    Testing is discussed to express the importance of knowing one’s own status to either get services if positive or methods of remaining negative.
  • Speakers covers Testing and goes over the difference between OraQuick and OraSure as well as confidential and anonymous testing. This is meant to break some of the myths with regards to testing.
  • Speakers covers Testing and goes over the difference between OraQuick and OraSure as well as confidential and anonymous testing. This is meant to break some of the myths with regards to testing.
  • Speakers covers Testing and goes over the difference between OraQuick and OraSure as well as confidential and anonymous testing. This is meant to break some of the myths with regards to testing.
  • Speakers covers Testing and goes over the difference between OraQuick and OraSure as well as confidential and anonymous testing. This is meant to break some of the myths with regards to testing.
  • Speakers covers Testing and goes over the difference between OraQuick and OraSure as well as confidential and anonymous testing. This is meant to break some of the myths with regards to testing.
  • Speakers covers Testing and goes over the difference between OraQuick and OraSure as well as confidential and anonymous testing. This is meant to break some of the myths with regards to testing.
  • Speakers also discuss abstinence as well as substance use and HIV.
    Abstinence is discussed but not just about sex but about any risky behavior that can be abstained from such as drug and alcohol.
    Safer sex is also discussed. (BEHIV staff and teachers/administration will discuss how much information can be shared with students).
  • Speaker finally discusses the importance of using common sense and applying to HIV prevention.
  • Used to field question.
  • Used to field questions but also to inform attendees of BEHIV’s location and contact information if speakers are unable to answer all questions.
  • Women2004updated

    1. 1. HIV/AIDS The Reality of Living
    2. 2. 418 473
    3. 3. 17101710 1572 1440
    4. 4. 1807 1692 1568
    5. 5. Proportion of AIDS Cases among Female Adults and Adolescents, by Exposure Category, 2002 United States Sex with injection drug user 15% Injection drug use 29% Other/not identified** 3% Sex with men of other or unspecified risk 53% † Heterosexual transmission 68% Note. Data adjusted for reporting delays and for redistribution of cases in persons initially reported without an identified risk. * Includes heterosexual contact with: a bisexual, a person with hemophilia, a transfusion recipient with HIV infection or HIV-infected person, risk not specified. ** Includes hemophilia, blood transfusion, perinatal, and risk not reported or not identified.
    6. 6. What is HIV/AIDS • HIV is the • Human • Immunodeficiency • Virus • AIDS is the • Acquired • Immuno- • Deficiency • Syndrome
    7. 7. What is HIV/AIDS • T-cells/CD4 cells produce antibodies to fight infections/illnesses • HIV attacks T-cells/CD4 Cells • T-cells/CD4 cells slowly decrease over time • Once under 200 T-cells/CD4 cells plus opportunistic infections, doctor will diagnosis you with AIDS
    8. 8. How Do You Become Positive • Unprotected sex • Sharing needles • Motherto child • Transfusions frominfected blood
    9. 9. Fungal Infections
    10. 10. Oral Thrush
    11. 11. Medication Side Effects (Just to Name a Few) Head achesFevers Nausea Vomiting Diarrhea Rashes Gas Fatty liver Fatigue Hairloss Depression Pancreatitis Mania Chills Optic neuritis Kidney damage Severe anemia Diabetes Fingernail discoloring Lypodystrophy Hallucinations Oral lesions Liverdamage
    12. 12. Drug Induced Skin Rash
    13. 13. SSI Payment for 2006 $603
    14. 14. How to Stay Negative • COMMUNICATION • GETTING TESTED
    15. 15. OraSure OraQuick
    16. 16. OraSure OraQuick
    17. 17. OraSure OraQuick
    18. 18. OraQuick
    19. 19. TIMES OraSureOraSure Two WeeksTwo Weeks LaterLater OraQuickOraQuick TwentyTwenty MinutesMinutes
    20. 20. OraSure OraQuick
    21. 21. How to Stay Negative • COMMUNICATION • GETTING TESTED • ABSTINENCE • DO NOT SHARE NEEDLES • DON’T DO DRUGS & ALCOHOL • PRACTICE SAFERSEX FINALLY
    22. 22. Common Sense
    23. 23. BetterExistence with HIV • 1244 W. Thorndale • Chicago, Il 60660 • 773-293-4740 x27 • www.behiv.org • 1740 Ridge • Evanston, Il 60201 • 847-475-2115 • Lou@behiv.org • Lee@behiv.org

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