Food Shopping on a Budget

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Here is how to get the best value for your money when grocery shopping.

Here is how to get the best value for your money when grocery shopping.

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  • Welcome to our show, Healthy Shopping on A Budget.
  • You will be surprised – some of the healthiest foods in the grocery store are the least expensive! Let’s learn! Speaker – as an ice breaker, ask the audience for a raise of hands for who thinks healthier food costs more? Most people think healthy food is about chicken breasts, fat-free cookies and leaner beef costing more than their regular counterparts. But healthy shopping is a whole lot more in scope – and a whole lot less in cost!
  • You will be surprised – some of the healthiest foods in the grocery store are the least expensive! Let’s learn! Speaker – as an ice breaker, ask the audience for a raise of hands for who thinks healthier food costs more? Most people think healthy food is about chicken breasts, fat-free cookies and leaner beef costing more than their regular counterparts. But healthy shopping is a whole lot more in scope – and a whole lot less in cost!
  • Here is what we will learn today!
  • Sure, fat free cookies cost more than regular cookies. But shopping for health on a budget is not about fat-free cookies! Shown above is 100 calories of grapes – cheaper and better than 100 calorie pack of cookies!
  • Here is a comparison of grain foods – least expensive versus some of the most expensive. Grains you cook yourself save you money. Prices are current 04/09 and represent store brands for the top category and averages for the bottom.
  • Look how the ones you cook yourself are much lower in sodium and saturated fat.
  • Items should be bought in bulk for best price per ounce – but only buy as much as you can use – you do not want waste. This chart shows that the less processed the better for price – and we are going to back that up with the nutrition facts on the next page!
  • Less processed equals less sodium and fat per serving, too!
  • Fresh fruit in season is your best bet. Canned goods are less expensive when they go on sale; choose ones with no added sugar – canned in water or juice.
  • The fresh fruit is lower in sugar – and calories!
  • The best value for protein is dried beans! This includes pinto beans, black beans, lentils, split peas and more! Don’t forget about dairy products for protein!
  • It is better to use less meat – most people eat 4 times the amount of protein they need per day. The Dietary Guidelines for Americans calls for most people to get a wider variety of protein in their diet meaning beans and fish. Fish is expensive, but if you keep the amount per portion small and only serve once a week you can keep that cost down, too.
  • Skim milk is a great value. Consider powdered skim milk, too. An 8 ounce glass of milk costs .25cents and provides 9 essential nutrients!!
  • And skim milk and yogurt are a lot lower in saturated fat (and sodium)
  • All of these items would add $38 to your bill! Many represent empty calories and have much healthier and cheaper alternatives.
  • Here is an example of how unit pricing can help you.
  • Compare boxed to bulk – bulk/non-processed wins hands down!
  • Lasagna at Olive Garden is $12.95 – so buying in a store versus eating out really saves money. But cooking a healthy one from scratch saves the most! Home made lasagna: 1.69 for 1 pound box noodles 1.67X2 for 2 jars sauce (24 oz each) 2.99 for 32-oz fat-free ricotta cheese = $8.02 for 96 ounces or 10 portions of home made lasagna
  • Lasagna Classico is from Olive Garden – look at the calories, fat, saturated fat and sodium! Prices shown are per serving.
  • Apples in bulk are more reasonable than apples per each – they are likely not to disappear quite as fast as cookies!
  • Packing your own lunch saves – but buying “lunch packs” costs more compared to when you do it yourself! If you are going to buy chips, consider one bulk package per week.
  • Herbs and veggies can be fun to grow – and they save you money. Consider local farmer’s markets, too!
  • Fresh chicken saves over deli chicken and it is lower in sodium, too. Roast a whole chicken once and serve it three times (see how in our blog – foodandhealth.com/blog/ )
  • Whole potatoes are not processed with fat and salt – and they are just $3.99 for a 5 pound bag or .03 per ounce!!
  • Pictured above – crock pot apple sauce made from older apples bought on sale – for snacks and desserts
  • Here is an online weekly flyer from a local grocery store – most likely the one you shop at has the same or you can pick up a flyer in your paper.
  • Coupons are only good if you are buying the items anyway!
  • Cheap breakfast ideas…keep these items on hand for inexpensive breakfast on the go. Oatmeal is just .32 per cup – compare to spending much more at a coffee house or fast-food restaurant when you get hungry.
  • Use vinegar instead of salad dressing and save money and sodium! Leftovers are always your best bet!!
  • The hostess cup cakes come in 100 calorie packs – but look how many carrots you can have for a lot cheaper per ounce – and which do you think would disappear faster in your house? The one that costs the most of course!
  • Budget quick meals – pictured above is the make your own burrito night – also in our blog – foodandhealth.com/blog/ Serving “make your own” pasta, potatoes, burritos, tacos and salad for dinner makes being on a budget more fun and interactive for families.
  • Here is a healthful budget shopping list!
  • Store brands are usually the best deal. Keep a journal. Wal-Mart is one of the most popular discount stores – food sales are almost 50% of their total sales (source, WSJ.com, 04/09)
  • The muffins above were made from bananas that got too ripe and were frozen. Freezing leftovers and excess fruits as they become too ripe is a good idea to avoid waste.
  • Read the nutrition facts label to avoid items that are high in sodium and saturated fat and trans fat. Most likely they are the expensive foods in the freezer, deli, and box/canned aisle.
  • These are from dietitians and home economists from an online survey to over 200 health professionals – you can see results online at foodandhealth.com – click on survey under free resources.
  • Benefits to good shopping are many!
  • Often overlooked – more tips to save and eat better!
  • Review – here is what you need to remember!
  • Testimonial from stay at home dad!

Transcript

  • 1. Healthier Foods… Save Dough!
  • 2.
    • True or false?
      • Healthier food costs more.
  • 3.
    • True or false?
      • Healthier food costs more.
    • Answer: False. The least-processed foods are the least expensive and many of them are the healthiest!
  • 4.
    • Best deals each food group
    • Beware – more expensive
    • Money-saving tips
    • Planning saves money
    • Best meal ideas for you
    • Action plan and review
  • 5.
    • Best deals are least processed of each food group
    • Less processing = less sodium, fat, sugar
  • 6.
    • Rice (white or brown) 4¢
    • Oatmeal 8¢
    • Pasta 6¢
    • Boxed rice mix 25¢
    • Frozen dinner with pasta 35¢
    • Boxed cereal 25¢
    • Toaster pastries/cereal bars 25¢
  • 7.
    • mg sodium g sat fat
    • Rice 0 0.0
    • Pasta 0 0.0
    • Oatmeal 0 0.0
    • Boxed rice 1150 2.0
    • Frozen lasagna 1170 4.0
    • Boxed cereal 200 0.5
  • 8.
    • Cabbage 3 ¢
    • Potatoes 3 ¢
    • Corn 8 ¢
    • Carrots 8 ¢
    • Broccoli 9 ¢
    • Cauliflower 9 ¢
    • Cucumber 9 ¢
    • Green beans 11 ¢
    • Frozen potatoes 17 ¢
    • Instant mashed potatoes 21 ¢
    • Potato chips 33 ¢
  • 9.
    • mg sodium g sat fat
    • Cabbage 15 0
    • Carrots 84 0
    • Potatoes 17 0
    • Broccoli 30 0
    • Frozen potatoes 485 2
    • Instant potatoes 450 1
    • Potato chips 230 2
  • 10.
    • Bananas 3¢
    • Apples 5¢
    • Oranges 3¢
    • Melon (in season) 3¢
    • Canned with sugar 16¢
    • Frozen with sugar 33¢
    • Pie with fruit 22¢
  • 11.
    • g sugar calories per ½ cup
    • Bananas 9 66
    • Apples 5 28
    • Oranges 8 42
    • Melons 6 27
    • Canned with sugar 23* 100
    • Frozen with sugar 35* 150
    • Pie with sugar 21* 350
    • *Includes added sugar in processing!
  • 12.
    • Beans (dried) 6¢
    • Eggs 6¢
    • Whole turkey/chicken 8¢
    • Peanut butter 9¢
    • Ground turkey/lean beef 12¢
    • Egg whites 17¢
    • Canned tuna 20¢
    • Roast beef 28¢
    • Deli ham 61¢
    • Steak 68¢
  • 13.
    • g saturated fat per 3 ounces
    • Beans (dried) 0
    • Eggs 2.5
    • Whole turkey/chicken 1.5
    • Peanut butter (2 Tbsp) 3
    • Ground turkey/lean beef 2
    • Egg whites 0
    • Tuna .5
    • Roast beef 4.5
    • Deli ham* *2.2
    • Steak 6.5
    • *Very high in sodium (over 1100 mg)
  • 14.
    • Skim milk 4¢
    • Fat-free yogurt 7¢
    • Cheddar cheese 23¢
    • Gourmet cheese 50¢
  • 15.
      • g saturated fat per cup
    • Skim milk 0
    • Fat-free yogurt 0
    • Cheddar cheese 28
    • Gourmet cheese 25
    Cheese is the number one source of fat in the American diet!
  • 16.
    • Soda $4.99/12 pack
    • Cookies $3.50/15 oz pack
    • Crackers $3.99/7 oz box
    • Cereal $3.59/14 oz box
    • Frozen meals $3.29/10 ounce
    • Boxed meals $1.67/6 ounce
    • Meat $4.99/pound
    • Cheese $8.49/pound
    • Sweetened drinks $3.49/1 liter =$38
  • 17.
    • What is a better deal: a 14 oz can of soup for 80¢, or a 48 oz can of soup for $3.19? 
    • The 14 ounce can is cheaper!
    • “ Cost Per Unit” is usually on store shelves
  • 18.
    • Compare boxed rice to bulk rice
    26¢/ounce 4¢/ounce Saving Tip
  • 19.
    • Compare frozen dinner to prepared from scratch low-fat lasagna
    24¢/ounce $2.50 per serving 8¢/ounce 80¢ per serving Saving Tip
  • 20.
    • Lasagna scratch 80¢
    • Lasagna frozen $2.35
    • Lasagna restaurant: $12.95
      • Calories 850
      • Fat 47g
      • Saturated fat 25g
      • Sodium 2,830mg
  • 21.
    • Compare cookies to apples
    $4.99 for 12 packs .41 each .06/ounce .29 each Which do you think would disappear faster? Saving Tip
  • 22.
    • Buy in bulk and put in baggies yourself
    22¢ per ounce 46¢ per ounce Saving Tip
  • 23.
    • Grow your own herbs and vegetables
    • Can and freeze extras
    Saving Tip
  • 24.
    • Compare chicken:
    $8.99/pound $1.59/pound Saving Tip
  • 25.
    • A 5 pound bag of potatoes is cheaper than chips, per ounce
    34¢/ounce 3¢/ounce Saving Tip
  • 26.
    • Use up what you have at home
    • Check store flyers for specials (check online or in the paper), gather coupons
    • Write down meal ideas
    • Make a shopping list
    • Stick to the list
    • Combine errands, too
    Make your own applesauce!
  • 27.  
  • 28.
    • Use for items you are buying anyway
    • Don’t buy expensive items like chips, cookies, frozen foods and soda that are not in your budget
    • Store brands are often the best deal, even without coupons
  • 29.
    • Bananas
    • Fruit in season
    • English muffins
    • Whole grain toast
    • Oatmeal/grits
    • Skim milk
    • Yogurt
  • 30.
    • Leftovers
    • Baked potato
    • Sandwich
    • Salad —
    Salad dressing: 22¢ per ounce (280 mg sodium) Vinegar: 11¢ per ounce, no sodium!
  • 31.
    • Apples
    • Baked potatoes
    • Nonfat yogurt
    • Peanut butter sandwiches
    • Carrots
    • Leftovers
    55¢ per ounce 8¢ per ounce 100 calories
  • 32.
    • Lentils and rice
    • Pasta
    • Stir fry - (use meat/poultry as condiment)
    • Fish/chicken = 3 oz
    • Rice dishes – chicken/rice
    • Tacos/burritos
    • Baked potatoes
  • 33.
    • Fruits and veggies in season
    • Dried beans/legumes
    • Rice, pasta, oatmeal, barley, grits (store brands)
    • Frozen produce on sale
    • Potatoes
    • Lean protein on sale
    • Skim milk, yogurt
  • 34.
    • Store brands usually cheapest
    • Items at the end of the aisle not usually the best deal
    • Make a journal so you learn pricing for items you buy regularly
  • 35.
    • Okay to stock up on non-perishables
    • Eliminate waste
    • Freeze leftovers/fruits/vegetables before they go bad
    • Buy frozen, canned, produce to help stretch shopping days
    Made from leftover bananas
  • 36.
    • Leave these out:
      • High sodium
      • High sugar – 6 g per teaspoon
      • High fat
      • High cholesterol
    • 5% or less of daily value = low
    • First ingredient? If sugar or “ose” then high in sugar
  • 37.
    • Eat out less often
    • Buy less processed food
    • Stock up on sale items
    • Clip coupons
    • Shop at discount stores (Wal-Mart)
  • 38.
    • Money savings
    • Time savings
    • Gas/car savings
    • Health: calories, fat, sodium
  • 39.
    • Right ingredients on hand means less eating out
    • Serve less meat per person
    • Apples and carrots for snacks
    • Pack grapes to go for eating on the run
    • Potatoes are underused
    • Shop in your freezer and pantry first!
  • 40.
    • Write a menu; use store specials
    • Make and stick to a list
    • Cheapest items from MyPyramid groups are less processed - rice, dried beans, seasonal produce
    • Plan meals around grains, fruits and vegetables
    • Unit pricing helps you save
    • Coupons only if makes sense
  • 41.
    • “ My wife and I shop for groceries on a weekly basis (with the exception of a rare mid-week stop for more milk or other pure staples). We shop from a grocery list, usually nail the sales, and focus almost entirely on buying produce. The end result is that we usually save quite a bit at the grocery store compared to what we could be spending.”
    • — Trent, TheSimpleDollar.com