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Media overview of the Olympics-past, present, future
 

Media overview of the Olympics-past, present, future

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  • ORIGIN late 16th cent.(originally denoting something intermediate in nature or degree): from Latin, literally ヤ middle, ユ neuter of medius . Media - latin meaning, reference to ancient media during the OG - (trumpeteers, heralds, scrolls, statues of winners) Media @ the games - historical review, Mr. Seguin as well as others presentation had already touched on the topic Media and the Games - a timely coincidence; the two entities were interested in the other from the early beginnings In 1896 - time of rapid technological change - invention of radio (…), emergence of photojournalism (in the 1930s) , invention of cinematography (1895)- competing with the already established print journalism 1928 - Amsterdam on radio - Athlete’s oath on radio
  • Television as the sum of what other media could offer individually First televised attempts in 1936 - also first media regulations, media guide was published: "General Rules and Regulations for the Printed Press and Radio" which directed "announcers and reporters to restrict their comments to the Olympic events and travel appreciation, with no mention of the political, and especially religious, issues in German Cortina, 1956 - 4 cameras were used to cover the bobsleigh race on television from start to finish (a better view on tv then at the venue) For example, at Turin 2006, access to Olympic news and images was possible via the Internet, mobile phones and multiple television channels. Additionally, HDTV television was available for the first time to a larger public while video coverage suited for mobile phones was also a first
  • Political divergences between the United States and France had lessened the American broadcasters ’ interest in the Olympic Games of Paris 1924 but a similar lack of interest coming from the American listeners, together with the limited technical progress in transatlantic transmission experiments, maintained the little if not non-existent. While at the previous Olympics held in Amsterdam in 1926 the European broadcasting industry was in crisis over the allocation of wavelengths, the London Games of 1929 allowed radio broadcasters, though restrictions were imposed upon them by the Newspaper Proprietors ’ Association:
  • In the first editions of rights selling, the IOC commissioned its tv service, local providers or alliances acting as host broadcaster Later, the magnitude of the Games didn’t allow for a single broadcaster to handle the transmission - Munich 1972 - Deutche Olympische Zeitung, Barcelona 1992 - Radio Televisio Olympica ‘92. Nowadays, IOC has its own camera crews
  • While London 1948 looks the be the first Games where television rights were paid, official negotiations did not take place until 1952 prior to the Helsinki Winter Games. It took almost 6 years more for the IOC to define its financial expectation and perfect its requirements for television rights buyers, the famous Article 49 being incorporated in the Olympic Charter only in 1958. t he rights shall be sold by the Organising Committee, with the approval of the IOC, and the revenues distributed in accordance with its instructions In the first editions of rights selling, the IOC commissioned its tv service, local providers or alliances acting as host broadcaster Later, the magnitude of the Games didn ’ t allow for a single broadcaster to handle the transmission - Munich 1972 - Deutche Olympische Zeitung, Barcelona 1992 - Radio Televisio Olympica ‘ 92. Nowadays, IOC has its own camera crews (IBC) Broadscast customization comes into place as well Table is missing Helsinki (1952) and Melbourne (1956); Helsinki was not broadcast; Melbourne - entertainment/news debate.
  • 4 (1962) - 40 (1970) - 376.000 (1991) - 13 million (1996)
  • Now at 298 million users
  • NBCOlympics.com delivered 2,200 hours of live event video coverage, with more than 20 simultaneous live streams at times; more than 3,000 hours of on-demand video content including full-event replays, highlights, features, interviews and encore packages; an "enhanced playback mode" powered by Microsoft Silverlight that gave users the choice of a high-quality full-screen viewing experience or multiple windows of video; and metadata overlays powered by Silverlight that enabled fans to quickly access related content including results, stats, bios and more.In addition to all this, a lot of the clips-based content was also formatted for SD and HD video-on-demand, mobile phone delivery, and electronic sell-through on sites like Amazon. "It's very complex, but we really set the groundwork [in Beijing]," said Dan Hogan, vice president for technology at NBC Sports and Olympics.
  • NBCOlympics.com delivered 2,200 hours of live event video coverage, with more than 20 simultaneous live streams at times; more than 3,000 hours of on-demand video content including full-event replays, highlights, features, interviews and encore packages; an "enhanced playback mode" powered by Microsoft Silverlight that gave users the choice of a high-quality full-screen viewing experience or multiple windows of video; and metadata overlays powered by Silverlight that enabled fans to quickly access related content including results, stats, bios and more.In addition to all this, a lot of the clips-based content was also formatted for SD and HD video-on-demand, mobile phone delivery, and electronic sell-through on sites like Amazon. "It's very complex, but we really set the groundwork [in Beijing]," said Dan Hogan, vice president for technology at NBC Sports and Olympics.
  • with so much media around i guess the ioc is facing a new revolution of sorts 16:23 which media will prevail? So far outlets use convergent techniques and content but there is so clear tendency of whether one is preferred to the other Convergence and web 2.0 however give more choice to the viewers, the public and consumers of the olympic games But more choice means more trouble when it comes to control and protection of the olympic brand as well as when it comes to monitoring, tracking and justifing expenses Similarly, monitoring issues and preventing crises is so much more difficult when the outlets through which a message can be sent/be accessed are so diverse Talking about the public, questions about its concentration or media diversity fatigue need to be raised ( a good ROI is obtained when the public is reached when it wants to and in the way it desires but how can that be decided when so many choices are around?) Athletes are members of the public but also of the Olympic Family (discuss) Conclusion: that the IOC/olympic movement's relationship with media is just a reflection of common practice and views at a specific moment in time Currently efforts are made to split new media rights from TV Also IOC is looking to sell rights to media groups that can cover the widest media area - see the Canadian example The Olympic movement and family might become more accountable for their choices (questions on twitter about chicago’s financial plan; blogsphere writing about human rights, environmental protection an housing in vancouver and beijing…)
  • A medium's content may shift ( … ) and its social status rise or fall ( … ) but once a medium establishes itself as satisfying some core human demand, it continues to function within the larger system of communication options. (...) Each old medium was forced to coexist with the emerging media. That's why convergence seems more plausible as a way of understanding the past several decades of media change than the old digital revolution paradigm had.

Media overview of the Olympics-past, present, future Media overview of the Olympics-past, present, future Presentation Transcript

  • The New Colors of Olympic Media
    • Definitions
    • Short history of media @ the Games
    • “ New!” media
    • Beijing 2008
    • The Social Media Olympics
    • media 1 | ˈ m ē d ēə |
    • noun
    • 1 plural form of medium .
    • 2 (usu. the media) [treated as sing. or pl. ] the main means of mass communication (esp. television, radio, newspapers, and the Internet) regarded collectively : [as adj.] the campaign won media attention.
    • web 2.0
      • the era of user generated content and the boundaries between media genres boundaries blurred
    • Olympic Movement
    • encompasses any organizations, athletes or persons who agree to be guided by the Olympic Charter and to recognize the authority of the IOC in respect of that commitment
    • Convergence media culture
      • the collision of old and new media, along with the intersection of grassroots and corporate media and the unpredictable interaction between media producers and media consumers
  • Looking back
    • 1867 - modern typewriter
    • 1877 - high speed photography
    • 1884 - the linotype printing press
    • 1887 - invention of radio
    • 1888 - roll film camera
    • 1895 - invention of cinematography
    • 1896 - first modern Olympic Games
    • 1902 - radio signals
    • 1906 - first communication of human voice
    • 1910 - first talking motion picture
    • 1936 - first uses of photojournalism as a new independent genre (during the Spanish Civil War) + black & white TV
  • Innovation Olympics
    • Live broadcast (Cortina,1956)
    • Live multi-national simultaneous broadcast, instant replays (Rome, 1960)
    • Satellite broadcast, freeze-frame (Tokyo, 1964)
    • Color live broadcast and slow-motion footage (Mexico, 1968)
    • Video-on-demand, 3-D high-definition, “ webcasting ” (Nagano, 1998)
    • Online television (Athens, 2004).
    • Video coverage for mobile phones; Olympic news and images shared online (Turin, 2006)
  • Media competition
    • London, 1929 - first radio presence (with restrictions imposed by the Newspaper Proprietors’ Association)
      • “ The BBC still had to take news bulletins exclusively from the press agencies (the Newspaper Society, Reuters Limited, the Press Association, the Exchange Telegraph Company and the Central News); could not edit its own news (this remained in force until 1930); and could not broadcast a news bulletin until 6 p.m ” )
      • McCoy, 1997
    • Berlin, 1936 - the first media regulations ("General Rules and Regulations for the Printed Press and Radio ” )
      • "announcers and reporters to restrict their comments to the Olympic events and travel appreciation, with no mention of the political, and especially religious, issues in Germany ”
      • McCoy, 1997
    • London, 1948 - BBC offers IOC money for the exclusivity of broadcast
    • Helsinki, 1952 - the first official TV rights negotiations
  • The Olympics favorite medium: TV
    • 1958 - Article 49 (Media Coverage of the Olympic Games) being incorporated in the Olympic Charter
      • “ 1. IOC takes all necessary steps in order to ensure the fullest coverage by the different media and the widest possible audience in the world for the Olympic Games
      • 2. All decisions concerning the coverage of the Olympic Games by the media rest within the competence of the IOC. “
      • Olympic Charter, 2007
    • From commissioning the TV services in the 60s to having a single Olympic broadcaster in the 70s and later
  • Berlin, 1936 London, 1948 Athens, 2004 Beijing, 2008
  •  
  • The underdog
    • ARPANET
      • 4 (1962) => 40 (1970) => 376.000 (1991) => 13M (1996)
    • Uses:
      • Commercial exchange, daily management of personal information, business information management, institutional promotion, journalistic information and entertainment
    • Fears:
      • Internet will lead to the collapse of broadcast
      • Computers will destroy the mass culture
    • Internet users in the world
    • Asia - 704 mil
    • Europe - 402 mil
    • North America - 251 mil
    • Latin America/ Caribbean - 175 mil
    • Africa - 65 mil
    • Middle East - 47 mil
    • Oceania/ Australia - 20 mil
  • The Olympic Movement Online
    • A not-to-be missed opportunity for the Olympic Movement ’ s information policies
    • 1996, Atlanta - the first OCOG website
      • online Olympic multimedia
      • TV ’ s main competitor
    • May, 1998
      • 70% of the International Olympic Federations and 18% of the National Olympic Committees were present online having their own website
  • “ The plurality of contents and the large dimension of the audience reached in Nagano, increased still further in Sydney 2000, present new problems for Olympic communication policy and, more specifically, for its policies regulating rights and cessation of exclusives. The first and main battle will be fought within the Olympic system itself. Especially significant was the competitiveness established between the site of the Sydney 2000 Organising Committee ( www.olympics.com ) and the web site of NBC ( www.NBColympics.com ) ” Miguel de Moragas, 1999
  •  
  • Beijing 2008
    • Beijing 2008 - The Hi-Tech Olympics
    • 221 million Internet users in China
      • 15% increase compared to 2007
      • Surpassed the US before the 2009 projection date
      • Most active blogospheres (20 million active bloggers)
    • 2 media centers
      • IOC accredited media centre
      • Beijing International Media Centre (also known as “non-accredited media” centre)
  • What was expected?
    • Speed
    • Dynamism
    • Novelty
    • Multiplicity of close-by unique angles
    • Variety
      • video on mobile phones, news alerts on email, RSS on the blogs, 3D and HDTV television and maybe even parallel Olympics in Second Life inspired by the competitions happening in the stadia
    • More attempts of information control
  •  
  •  
  • What did we get?
    • IOC blogging guidelines for athletes and Olympic family
    • IOC YouTube deal
    • multi-media, multi-platform Olympic coverage
    • Simultaneous online live streams
    • On-demand online streams
    • HD full-screen/multiple windows viewing experience
    • Citizen journalists
  • What does this mean for:
    • Media
      • Traditional media
      • Social media
      • Mobile media
    • Public
    • Athletes
    • Advertisers/Sponsors
    • IOC
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • What next?
    • Old media are not being replaced or displaced.
      • Rather, their functions and status are shifted by the introduction of new technologies.
    • More convergence
      • A further blurring of media genres boundaries
    • Separation of new media rights from broadcasting rights
    • Tighter media rules and brand protection measures