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Climate Literacy May 20 2009 V2 2
 

Climate Literacy May 20 2009 V2 2

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Short presentation on current efforts to develop a climate literate society.

Short presentation on current efforts to develop a climate literate society.

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  • So what do we mean by Literacy Literacy is continuum of competency Higher levels of competency are built on the foundation of broader more simplistic understanding. At any level within the continuum one can be described as having achieved some level of literacy/competency (e.g., 4 th grade reading level) At the highest levels, a person has internalized knowledge and is able to synthesized information from multiple sources to comprehend and make informed decisions about new situations. This simplified 3-tiered model we are using in NOAA is supported by analogous to levels of understanding described in education theory (e.g., Bloom, Wiggens & McTighe).
  • The Climate Science Literacy Guide serves as a framework for understanding and communicating about climate science. The ideas outlined in the guide represent the knowledge that is deemed important for citizens to know and understand about Earth’s climate. The guide aims to promote greater Climate Science Literacy among the public by providing this list of climate principles and concepts. Development of the guide began at a workshop sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Numerous individuals and organizations made significant contributions through rich conversations and insightful reviews. Multiple science agencies, non-governmental organizations, and individuals also contributed through extensive review and comment periods.

Climate Literacy May 20 2009 V2 2 Climate Literacy May 20 2009 V2 2 Presentation Transcript

  • Frank Niepold Climate Education Coordinator and Education Interagency Working Group Co-chair (CCSP) National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Literacy
  • Which contributes most to global warming? Source: Leiserowitz, 2003 ( n = 673) [email_address]
  • Revolutionizing Earth System Science Education for the 21st Century: Report and Recommendations from a 50-State Analysis of Earth Science Education (2007) Atmosphere, Weather and Climate in State Standards: Forty-two states directly (n = 30) or indirectly (n = 12) address atmosphere, weather and climate within their standards. Eight states have standards that fail to adequately address atmosphere, weather or climate concepts.
      • … a continuum of competency
    Climate Literacy is… Literacy Progression Target Audiences Uninterested and/or unaware Climate science interested Climate science attentive Climate science engaged CLIMATE LITERACY INFORMED DECISION MAKING KNOWLEDGE AWARENESS Long-term, the vision expects a society capable of informed decision-making
  • Climate Literacy development Current Federal Partners: NOAA, EPA, NSF and US Forest Service   NOAA's Climate Program Office Education and Outreach program are developing the climate literacy essential principles as part of NOAA's environmental literacy priority through a partnership with NOAA's Office of Education, outside agencies and numerous organizations. The Climate Science Literacy Guide serves as a framework for understanding and communicating about climate science. The ideas outlined in the guide represent the knowledge that is deemed important for citizens to know and understand about Earth’s climate. The guide aims to promote greater Climate Science Literacy among the public by providing this list of climate principles and concepts.
  • Guiding Principle. Humans can take actions to reduce climate change and its impacts 1. The Sun is the primary source of energy for Earth’s climate system 2. Climate is regulated by complex interactions among components of the Earth system. 3. Life on Earth depends on, is shaped by, and affects climate 4. Climate varies over space and time through both natural and man-made processes 5. Our understanding of the climate system is improved through observations, theoretical studies, and modeling 6. Human activities are impacting the climate system 7. Climate change will have consequences for the Earth system and human lives  
  • Advancing climate literacy
    •   Use the “Climate Literacy: The Essential Principles of Climate Science” (Version 2, March 2009) framework to organize resource development.
    • Establish a voluntary national climate education curriculum for K-16.
    • Continue investments in climate education research that lead to more effective strategies.
    • Provide a focus within individual agency programs on professional development for formal educators.
    • Support creation of interpretive and educational programs and products that leverage existing outreach and extension networks and informal science education venues.
    • Develop new resources and tools that utilize “new media” and emerging outlets for widespread dissemination and public engagement in climate.
    • Foster development of an agency-wide protocol for designating and labeling educational programs of merit (Climate education collections)
    • Establish mechanisms for monitoring public understanding of climate literacy, and related actions.
    Coordinating Federal Investments in Climate and Earth System Science Education -- Developed from ongoing discussions within the US CCSPAd-hoc Education Interagency Working Group