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Climate literacy-ams annual v1

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CLEAN's primary goal is to steward a broad collection of educational resources and foster a supporting community to help facilitate students, teachers, and citizens becoming climate literate and …

CLEAN's primary goal is to steward a broad collection of educational resources and foster a supporting community to help facilitate students, teachers, and citizens becoming climate literate and informed about "the climate's influence on you and society and your influence on climate."

The focus of CLEAN's efforts are to integrate the effective use of the resources across all educational levels – with a particular focus on the middle-school through undergraduate levels (grades 6-16) as well as to citizens through formal and informal education venues and communities. The activities of the CLEAN Pathway project have 3 major components.

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  • True color MODIS composite image of Earth by Reto Stockli (under subcontract to SSAI working for NASA). City lights image on night side of terminator from DMSP OLS data, courtesy Chris Elvidge, NOAA.
  • History:CLG 2007-presentAAAS BSL-AtlasTri-PICLEANCL-LandscapeWhere do we go?
  • CLEAN Pathway supports the USGCRP Education priority of a “Voluntary National Climate Education Curriculum”
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • http://cleanet.org/clean/community/activities.html#system
  • http://cleanet.org/clean/community/activities/compare_locations.html
  • * The CLEAN Pathway has focused on identifying and annotating existing online resources for grades six to 16 and reviewed tens of thousands of learning activities and other “useful bits” such as videos, short investigations and visualizations for potential inclusion in the CLEAN collection. A gap analysis conducted by the CLEAN effort after the completion of the first phase (CLEAN Gap and Thin Spot Analysis of the CLEAN Collection, http://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis ) reveals that in some areas, such as strategies to reduce greenhouse gases, there are myriad resources, in other areas, such as climate adaptation strategies, there are few if any high quality materials. While CLEAN’s current scope is limited by not including complete curricula or textbooks, an informal review of existing curricula and textbooks suggests a similar pattern of incompleteness in these materials. It is important to note that the fact that a resource didn't make it into the CLEAN collection may be a question of alignment and granularity, not quality. Review comments for the accepted resources are available online with the resource description. Reviews for resources that were not included are available to their developers, upon request.  CLEAN, with its limited scope, cannot fully inform us about the full range of curricula and effective strategies. Indeed, sustainability-related education, which overlaps significantly with climate and energy education, is blossoming in schools, districts, and on campuses around the nation. What CLEAN can contribute to the effort of surveying the landscape of climate change education resources is a sense of the state of online resources, the needs of educators who have been surveyed for the CLEAN informant study, and research on appropriate scope and sequence for climate and related topics in the curriculum.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Increasing Climate LiteracyFrank NiepoldNOAA Climate Program OfficeClimate Education CoordinatorFrank.niepold@noaa.govClimate.govJanuary 6, 2013 1
    • 2. NOAA’s Next Generation Strategic PlanLong-TermGoal: Climate Adaptation and Mitigation:An informed society anticipating and responding toclimate and its impactsWithin this goal, NOAA will pursue specific objectives that over the next fiveyears: Objective: A climate-literate public that understands its vulnerabilities to a changing climate and makes informed decisions Over the next five years, evidence of progress toward this objective will include: - Key segments of society understand climate risks and use that knowledge to increase resilience to likely climate impacts; - Consumers of climate information understand climate uncertainty and utilize this knowledge in their decision-making processes; and - Educators and other outreach professionals increase their use of climate science resources.
    • 3. Climate Literacy is…• …a continuum of competency and is an ongoing process. Target AudiencesLiteracyProgression Climate science INFORMED engaged DECISION MAKING Climate science attentive KNOWLEDGE Climate science interested AWARENESS Uninterested and/or unaware
    • 4. Climate Literacy development NOAAs Climate Program Office Education and Outreach program are developing the climate literacy essential principles as part of NOAAs environmental literacy priority through a partnership with NOAAs Office of Education, outside agencies and numerous organizations. The Climate Science Literacy Guide serves as a framework for understanding and communicating about climate science. The ideas outlined in the guide represent the knowledge that is deemed important for citizens to know and understand about Earth’s climate. The guide aims to promote greater Climate Science Literacy among the public by providing this list of climate principles and concepts. Current Federal Partners: NOAA, EPA, NSF and US Forest Service
    • 5. Climate Science Literacy is… …an understanding of your influence on climate and climate’s influence on you and society. A climate literate person: •understands the essential principles of Earth’s climate system, • knows how to assess scientifically credible information about climate, •communicates about climate and climate change in a meaningful way, and • is able to make informed and responsible decisions with regard to actions that may affect climate.
    • 6. 6
    • 7. What are current materials trying toteach students about climate change? 8
    • 8. Role of a Boundary Framework: Climate and Energy Literacy documents?– Pressing need to infuse climate and energy literacy into schools and 2008/2009 other educational contexts to prepare society and future 2010 workforce to addresses the environmental issues and challenges of the 2011 future. 2012
    • 9. Role of a Boundary Framework: Climate Literacy document? The framework was built off the foundation of the AAAS Project 2061 Benchmarks and Atlas for Science Literacy The Climate Literacy framework established the goal for individuals and communities to have an ability “to make informed and responsible decisions with regard to actions that may affect climate.” This goal will require a more comprehensive focus and integrative approach than most climate educational resources, programs, textbooks or curricula now address due to the fragmentation and lack of prioritization of the climate topic in current educational systems. This framework has begun to inform the development of climate educational materials and resources, national and state standards, and professional development materials and programs. 10
    • 10. Landscape Analysis of the Quality of Climate Materials?• CLEAN is completing the analysis by aligning, collecting and annotating 500 excellent digital teaching resources addressing climate science or energy (of 10’s of thousands of resources)• Resources scientifically and pedagogically reviewed• Resources annotated reflecting reviewer comments• Resources aligned with • National Science Education Standards • AAAS Project 2061Benchmarks for Science Literacy • NAAEE Excellence in Environmental Education Guidelines for Learning 11
    • 11. What is an excellent activity?Scientific Accuracy• Is the source authoritative and trust-worthy?• Is the science accurate and current?• Are there proper citations or references?Alignment with Climate and Energy Concepts• Are the learning activities or useful bits at a reasonable level of granularity relative to key climate and energy concepts?Pedagogy• Is there pedagogical scaffolding or “teaching tips”?• If not, will educators be able to easily develop their own strategies to engage learners with this resource?Ease of Use• Is the resource easily accessible online?• If other materials or software is required, can it be easily and inexpensively accessed by educators or learners?For a complete list of the CLEAN Review Criteria, refer to http://cleanet.org/clean/about/review.html 12
    • 12. CLEAN Review Process
    • 13. CLEAN Review Criteria Learning Visualization Video Short Activity Demo/ Experiment Learning Visualization Video Short Demo/ Activity ExperimentScientific Accuracy 7 5 6 6(eg. attribution, scientific process, question questions questions questionsscientific validity, orginal data sources, svalid concepts, misconceptions,avoiding bias, references)Pedagogic Effectiveness 10 6 5 7(eg. learning objectives, learning question questions questions questionsstyles, diverse audience, prerequisite sskills, assessment, inquiry, engaging &motivating)Usability and Technical Quality 7 6 5 4(eg. advertisements, materials, question questions questions questionssupport required, teacher guide, sdesign, access, size )
    • 14. Assessment The Process s CurriculaFramework Standards InstructionNRC-AAAS Achieve + NSTA 26 states Teacher development 15
    • 15. NGSS Matrix of Standards by Grade Level and Life Science (19) Topic Earth Space Science (102) Physical Science (3) Engineering &Technology (1) Organisms and Their Environments (2) Weather (9) Structure and Properties of Matter K Structure and Function Patterns and Cycles Light and Sound (1) 1Elementary School Interdependence of Organisms and their Earths Changing Surface Structure, Properties, and Interactions of 2 Surroundings (3) Matter Pushes and Pulls Environmental Impacts on Organisms Weather, Climate, and Impacts (9) Interactions of Forces 3 Structure, Function, and Stimuli (5) Life Cycles and Traits Processes that Shape the Earth (4) Energy 4 Waves Matter and Energy in Ecosystems (3) Earth Systems and Their Interactions Structure, Properties, and Interactions of 5 Stars and the Solar System (8) Matter Structure, Function, and Information Space Systems (1) Structure and Properties of Matter Engineering Design Processing History of Earth Chemical Reactions (1) Links Among Growth, Development, and Earths Interior Processes Forces and Motion Engineering, Middle School Reproduction of Organisms (2) Earths Surface Processes Interactions of Forces Technology, Matter and Energy in Organisms and Science and Weather and Climate (18) Energy (1) Ecosystems (1) Society (1) Human Impacts (1) Waves and Electromagnetic Radiation Interdependent Relationships in Ecosystems Natural Selection and Adaptations Structure, Function, and Information Space Systems (1) Structure and Properties of Matter Engineering Design Processing History of Earth Chemical Reactions Links Among Matter and Energy in Organisms and Earths Systems (22) Nuclear Processes Engineering, Ecosystems (2) Climate Change (32) Forces and Motion Technology, High School Interdependent Relationships in Science and Human Sustainability (4) Interactions of Forces Ecosystems (1) Society Energy Natural Selection and Evolution Forces and Energy Inheritance and Variation of Traits Waves Electromagnetic Radiation
    • 16. CLEAN Gap Analysishttp://cleanet.org/clean/community/gap_analysis
    • 17. What is the quality of the materials? 18
    • 18. What is the quality of the materials? 19
    • 19. What is the quality of the materials? 20
    • 20. What is the quality of the materials? 21
    • 21. An Example of a CLEAN Catalog Record Title, Link, Developer Description Time Notes from Topics Grade Level Climate Literacy 22
    • 22. NAAEENotes fromScience EducationStandards and Mapsof Concepts 23
    • 23. Teaching Materials Created at CLEAN Workshops• These climate and energy activities were created by faculty as part of the CLEAN professional development workshop series.• These materials are not yet part of the CLEAN collection of reviewed resources. 24
    • 24. Teaching the Climate System, May 2012 Workshop• These activities assemble various elements from the CLEAN reviewed collection to present a comprehensive treatment of one aspect of the climate system. These materials were created by faculty as part of the CLEAN Climate Workshop, held in May, 2012. 25
    • 25. Maps of Climate and Energy Concepts• Strong approaches to teaching about climate and energy make connections between the Essential Principles of Climate Science and help integrate the fundamental concepts into an overarching scope and sequence for student learning.
    • 26. Maps of Climate and Energy Concepts• The Climate and Energy Maps can help you understand what concepts form the foundation for any specific concept and what students need to fully understand it.
    • 27. Maps of Climate and Energy ConceptsIf you want to know how to build and move studentsunderstanding of climate and energy concepts to moreadvanced levels, you can simply examine the mapsabove the central concept.
    • 28. Maps of Climate and Energy ConceptsThe Earth-2 Transfer of thermal energy between the atmosphere and theland or oceans produces temperature gradients in the atmosphere and theoceans. Regions at different temperatures rise or sink or mix, resulting inwinds and ocean currents. These winds and ocean currents, which arealso affected by the earths rotation and the shape of the land, carrythermal energy from warm to cool areas. (4B/H2)The Earth-4 Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, such as carbondioxide and water vapor, are transparent to much of the incoming sunlightbut not to the infrared light from the warmed surface of the earth. Whengreenhouse gases increase, more thermal energy is trapped in theatmosphere, and the temperature of the earth increases the light energyradiated into space until it again equals the light energy absorbed from thesun. (4B/H4)The Earth-6 The earths climates have changed in the past, are currentlychanging, and are expected to change in the future, primarily due tochanges in the amount of light reaching places on the earth and thecomposition of the atmosphere. The burning of fossil fuels in the lastcentury has increased the amount of greenhouse gases in theatmosphere, which has contributed to Earths warming. (4B/H6)
    • 29. Maps of Climate and Energy ConceptsEnergy Sources and Use-2 When selecting fuels, it is important toconsider the relative advantages and disadvantages of each fuel. (8C/H2)Energy Sources and Use-5 Decisions to slow the depletion of energyresources can be made at many levels, from personal to national, andthey always involve trade-offs involving economic costs and socialvalues. (8C/H5)Information Processing-1 Computer modeling explores the logicalconsequences of a set of instructions and a set of data. The instructionsand data input of a computer model try to represent the real world so thecomputer can show what would actually happen. In this way, computersassist people in making decisions by simulating the consequences ofdifferent possible decisions. (8E/H1)
    • 30. What is the quality of the materials?Based on analysis being conducted through the Climate Literacy & Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) Pathway grant, which is focused primarily on existing digital resources The overall scope of the current materials* used teach students about climate change in the United States are often narrowly focused The quality is uneven Some important areas, such as adaptation, are largely missing or thinly covered Other areas, such as the Earth’s Energy Budget, lack outstanding interactive resources that will engage learners The gaps and thin spots could be filled through more focus of the development community (active grants) and future solicitations 35
    • 31. NOAA Evidence of progress: Educators and other outreachprofessionals increase comprehension and use of climate scienceconcepts and education resources36
    • 32. NOAA is Partnering with the CLEAN Project on the Climate PortalEducation section: Live Winter 201337
    • 33. The CLEAN Portal http://cleanet.org
    • 34. Guidance for Understanding and Teaching About Climate and EnergyScreencast Hit Play Button
    • 35. CLEAN: Maps of Climate & Energy Concepts
    • 36. The CLEAN Portal http://cleanet.org
    • 37. The CLEAN Collection http://cleanet.org/clean/educational_resources/index.htmlScreencast Hit Play Button
    • 38. A CLEAN ResourceScreencast Hit Play Button
    • 39. CLEAN Concept Map – Resources AlignmentScreencast Hit Play Button
    • 40. Conclusions and Recommendations Climate and related energy topics have the potential for integrating learning across disciplines. The inherent “problem based” nature of climate change, however, require skillful balance to avoid “gloom and doom” on one hand or inadequate strategies on the other. The Guiding Principle for Informed Climate Decisions-- Humans can take actions to reduce climate change and their impact-- which set the stage for the other Principles, is innately solutions oriented. 45

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