Arizona ispi apr 6 2011

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A presentation about the dawn of a new era in performance improvement. It is especially relevant to human performance technologists and to anyone with an interest in managing the performance of people, processes and organizations.

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Arizona ispi apr 6 2011

  1. 1. Human Performance TechnologyThe Dawn of a New EraFred Nickols, CPTArizona ISPI MeetingApril 6, 2011Copyright Fred Nickols 2011 1
  2. 2. A Note about NotesA copy of this presentation is available at:http://www.nickols.us/AZISPI2011.pdfCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 2
  3. 3. Introduction & Overview• The End of the Old Era– A shift in the nature of work & working– A shift in the locus of control– A need for some new models & a new approach• The Dawn of the New Era– Some models – performance & organizations– Some examples & ideas– Some discussionCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 3
  4. 4. The Disappearing FarmerCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 4
  5. 5. The Changing WorkforceCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 5
  6. 6. The Knowledge Worker“No one can direct him. He has to direct himself. He isthe guardian of his own standards, of his ownperformance, and of his own objectives.”Peter DruckerManagement (1973)Copyright Fred Nickols 2011 6
  7. 7. What Was It?It wasn’t a shift to knowledge work!Copyright Fred Nickols 2011 7
  8. 8. It Was a ShiftFrom…– materials-based,– easily observed,– prefigured workingactivitiesTo…– information-based,– difficult to observe,– configured workingactivitiesCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 8
  9. 9. The Mix of WorkCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 9
  10. 10. Industrial Era to Modern TimesCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 10
  11. 11. The Upshot of the Shift• We can no longer engineer their performance• They must engineer their own performance• Performance engineering must be woven intothe fabric of the organization; it must becomea pervasive and robust capability• HPT practitioners can help with that but weneed new models and a new approachCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 11
  12. 12. Performance Engineering ModelCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 12
  13. 13. The Performance PyramidCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 13
  14. 14. The Individual LevelCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 14
  15. 15. A Performance ProblemCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 15
  16. 16. In An Ideal WorldCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 16
  17. 17. The RealityCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 17
  18. 18. From Proximate to UltimateCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 18
  19. 19. Registration to EmploymentCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 19
  20. 20. The Load Rate ProblemCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 20
  21. 21. Individual Performance FactorsCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 21
  22. 22. The Process LevelCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 22
  23. 23. Applicant as ProcessorCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 23
  24. 24. Process Level QuestionsCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 24
  25. 25. The Organizational LevelCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 25
  26. 26. A Recurring Cycle of EventsCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 26
  27. 27. RecapCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 27
  28. 28. DiscussionCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 28
  29. 29. Related Resources• Manage Your Own Performance: No One ElseCan• Inside the Process Box• Fit & Fitness: The Yin & Yang of SustainabilityCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 29
  30. 30. Contact InformationCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 30Fred NickolsManaging PartnerDistance Consulting, LLC1558 Coshocton Ave – 303Mount Vernon, OH 43050(740) 504-0000
  31. 31. Some Related Matters• Performance Architecture• Contributions & Inducements• The Control of Discretionary Effort• The Control ProblemCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 31
  32. 32. Performance ArchitectureCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 32
  33. 33. Contributions-InducementsCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 33
  34. 34. The Control of Discretionary EffortCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 34
  35. 35. The Control ProblemCopyright Fred Nickols 2011 35
  36. 36. The Control Problem (cont’d)Copyright Fred Nickols 2011 36

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