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Interplay of Science and Inherited Knowledge in the Age of Telemedicine

Interplay of Science and Inherited Knowledge in the Age of Telemedicine

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  • If an institution has excess capacity in an online course they are teaching, then can sell seats to another university. If a university needs a full course section, it can buy it from another university. If an institution wants to start a program, they an do it jointly in collaboration with another university with each contributing professors.This is very similar to cloud computing as the need for resources is satisfied as demand warrants it.
  • TEN HIGHER ED TRENDS THAT AFFECT UAF Regional/National Focus Global FocusAs UAF moves towards a global engagement, dividing dominion over specific student catchment areas makes less sense. Rigidly defined geographical areas will begin to lose power while focus areas will increase. UAF can expect to do more in depth with areas of expertise by attracting collaborators from anywhere in the world to solve problems rather than attempt to be the sole provider of expertise due to a geographically defined mandate. Education for a Filtered Few Access To Intellectual Capital for the Whole SocietyA quick look around the advertisements for post-secondary education reveals a plethora of certifications, delivery methods, and potential vendors. The days of reserving college education for the elite have passed.  Degree as a Culmination of Learning Continuous LearningFew areas of professional knowledge will remain stagnant. A degree may mark a milestone, but it will not mark an ending. UAF will need to reconsider all aspects of the process to obtain a degree in light of students’ need for after graduation access to products of their UAF experience and ability to immediately continue with a wide variety of learning sources. Campus Based Learning Community Personal Learning EnvironmentThe campus based learning community provides a sense of camaraderie and protection as well as encouragement to students as they grapple with personal explorations. However, the effectiveness of a learning community depends on the strength of engagement. Electronic communication media expand the reach of academic and emotional attachment far beyond the campus. We find that as students progress they build a personal learning environment (PLE) to provide both timely and persistent sources of support and encouragement.  Teaching to a Homogenous Cohort Mass Customized Facilitation of LearningThe role of faculty is changing from the single source of information delivered in a single message to a student cohort filtered to be relatively homogenous. We now expect that students themselves have access to multiple sources of information on any topic, often even faster than the faculty member themselves. This situation leads to a need a new set of skills in facilitation that allows students to critically judge multiple information sources and productively share their findings. Institution Ordered Learning Events Self-Paced, Variable Size ModulesThere is no doubt that the standard of 14 week semester 3 credit courses will remain the information organizing choice for the near future among traditional formal learners. As the university engages with more non-formal learners off-campus who manage their own learning agenda, we can expect to see a much larger population seeking a self-paced structure that relies on a wide variety of learning organizational modules, including intense seven-week courses, random interval engagement, and customized curricula. Recognition of Formal Learning Recognition of Non-Formal LearningFormal learning describes the enrolled student in an institution of higher learning seeking a credential. The formality reflects a degree of structure and assessment within the institution. Non-formal learning is outside the structured education establishment, but not beyond the reach of appropriate assessment.An example of non-formal learning is the New York Times Knowledge Network . Discipline Specific Domain Project Specific DomainBusiness plans can be sorted into two categories depending on the type of work to be done. A “solution shop” seeks to define the problem from ambiguous circumstances. Highly trained people apply multiple perspectives to the problem. On the other hand, a “value-add shop” seeks to efficiently apply known solutions to known problems . These two kinds of shops adhere to different returns on investment and different opportunities for efficient success. Historically the university has mixed these two business plans by using highly trained faculty to apply known solutions to known problems. In addition, faculty are segregated into disciplines rather than project teams. The economic trends greatly favor organizing around problems to be solved. The strength of the university is to provide solutions to ambiguous, ill-defined problems. Monetize Content Monetize Facilitation of Critical JudgmentThe Internet has disrupted a number of business plans, e.g. telephone companies selling channels for voice; television stations selling programming; newspapers selling eye witness accounts, and universities selling content of courses. Each of the example industries has found themselves undercut by vastly cheaper, vastly more ubiquitous, and vastly more comprehensive aggregations of resources. We have moved from an economy of gatekeepers to scarcity to an economy of selection from abundance. The strength of the university will become facilitation of critical evaluation and the ability to collaborate. Individualist Sharing CultureFor many years students were cautioned to make sure all their work was their own. Sharing, even studying together, raised a red flag. Everyone was individually assessed and the relationship to intellectual property became enshrined in our copyright laws. The trend now is for open sharing of effort and openly building on previous efforts. Authorship has become more cloudy. We see the advent of a sharing culture complete with joint writing, feed forward gifting, remix, reuse, mashups, open courseware, and general shift towards transparency.   
  • TEN HIGHER ED TRENDS THAT AFFECT UAF Regional/National Focus Global FocusAs UAF moves towards a global engagement, dividing dominion over specific student catchment areas makes less sense. Rigidly defined geographical areas will begin to lose power while focus areas will increase. UAF can expect to do more in depth with areas of expertise by attracting collaborators from anywhere in the world to solve problems rather than attempt to be the sole provider of expertise due to a geographically defined mandate. Education for a Filtered Few Access To Intellectual Capital for the Whole SocietyA quick look around the advertisements for post-secondary education reveals a plethora of certifications, delivery methods, and potential vendors. The days of reserving college education for the elite have passed.  Degree as a Culmination of Learning Continuous LearningFew areas of professional knowledge will remain stagnant. A degree may mark a milestone, but it will not mark an ending. UAF will need to reconsider all aspects of the process to obtain a degree in light of students’ need for after graduation access to products of their UAF experience and ability to immediately continue with a wide variety of learning sources. Campus Based Learning Community Personal Learning EnvironmentThe campus based learning community provides a sense of camaraderie and protection as well as encouragement to students as they grapple with personal explorations. However, the effectiveness of a learning community depends on the strength of engagement. Electronic communication media expand the reach of academic and emotional attachment far beyond the campus. We find that as students progress they build a personal learning environment (PLE) to provide both timely and persistent sources of support and encouragement.  Teaching to a Homogenous Cohort Mass Customized Facilitation of LearningThe role of faculty is changing from the single source of information delivered in a single message to a student cohort filtered to be relatively homogenous. We now expect that students themselves have access to multiple sources of information on any topic, often even faster than the faculty member themselves. This situation leads to a need a new set of skills in facilitation that allows students to critically judge multiple information sources and productively share their findings. Institution Ordered Learning Events Self-Paced, Variable Size ModulesThere is no doubt that the standard of 14 week semester 3 credit courses will remain the information organizing choice for the near future among traditional formal learners. As the university engages with more non-formal learners off-campus who manage their own learning agenda, we can expect to see a much larger population seeking a self-paced structure that relies on a wide variety of learning organizational modules, including intense seven-week courses, random interval engagement, and customized curricula. Recognition of Formal Learning Recognition of Non-Formal LearningFormal learning describes the enrolled student in an institution of higher learning seeking a credential. The formality reflects a degree of structure and assessment within the institution. Non-formal learning is outside the structured education establishment, but not beyond the reach of appropriate assessment.An example of non-formal learning is the New York Times Knowledge Network . Discipline Specific Domain Project Specific DomainBusiness plans can be sorted into two categories depending on the type of work to be done. A “solution shop” seeks to define the problem from ambiguous circumstances. Highly trained people apply multiple perspectives to the problem. On the other hand, a “value-add shop” seeks to efficiently apply known solutions to known problems . These two kinds of shops adhere to different returns on investment and different opportunities for efficient success. Historically the university has mixed these two business plans by using highly trained faculty to apply known solutions to known problems. In addition, faculty are segregated into disciplines rather than project teams. The economic trends greatly favor organizing around problems to be solved. The strength of the university is to provide solutions to ambiguous, ill-defined problems. Monetize Content Monetize Facilitation of Critical JudgmentThe Internet has disrupted a number of business plans, e.g. telephone companies selling channels for voice; television stations selling programming; newspapers selling eye witness accounts, and universities selling content of courses. Each of the example industries has found themselves undercut by vastly cheaper, vastly more ubiquitous, and vastly more comprehensive aggregations of resources. We have moved from an economy of gatekeepers to scarcity to an economy of selection from abundance. The strength of the university will become facilitation of critical evaluation and the ability to collaborate. Individualist Sharing CultureFor many years students were cautioned to make sure all their work was their own. Sharing, even studying together, raised a red flag. Everyone was individually assessed and the relationship to intellectual property became enshrined in our copyright laws. The trend now is for open sharing of effort and openly building on previous efforts. Authorship has become more cloudy. We see the advent of a sharing culture complete with joint writing, feed forward gifting, remix, reuse, mashups, open courseware, and general shift towards transparency.   

AAAS09 - Curt Madison AAAS09 - Curt Madison Presentation Transcript

  • Interplay of Science and Inherited Knowledge in the Age of Telemedicine
    Curt Madison, PhD
    Director of eLearning Program Development
    University of Alaska Fairbanks
    AAAS Arctic Science Conference 2009
    Juneau, Alaska
  • Bethel Fish
  • The Dark Side
    Science + Distance Ed:Institutional Perspective
    Curt Madison, PhD
    Director of eLearning Program Development
    University of Alaska Fairbanks
    AAAS Arctic Science Conference 2009
    Juneau, Alaska
  • Competing Interests
  • Shared Institutional Goals
    Instill and manage doubt
    Leverage scarce resources
    Leverage abundant resources
    Get money
    Outsource obligations – teaching, final reports, community outreach
  • Rethinking the Enterprise
    Exploit advantages of permeable boundaries
    Dual business plans – Solution and Value Add
    Exploit culture of openness
  • Supplemental Funding
  • Distance Education Advantages Inherent to Science
    shared tools
    shared raw data
    embedded observers
    distributed students – share courses
    distributed professors – joint program
  • Course Exchange
  • TEN HIGHER ED TRENDS
    Regional/National Focus
    Education for a Filtered Few
    Degree as a Culmination of Learning
    Campus Based Learning Community
    Teaching to a Homogenous Cohort
    Institution Ordered Learning Events
    Recognition of Formal Learning
    Discipline Specific Domain
    Monetize Content
    Individualist
  • TEN HIGHER ED TRENDS
    Regional/National Focus
    Education for a Filtered Few
    Degree as a Culmination of Learning
    Campus Based Learning Community
    Teaching to a Homogenous Cohort
    Institution Ordered Learning Events
    Recognition of Formal Learning
    Discipline Specific Domain
    Monetize Content
    Individualist
    • Global Focus
    • Access for the Whole Society 
    • Continuous Learning
    • Personal Learning Environment
    • Mass Customized Facilitation of Learning
    • Self-Paced, Variable Size Modules
    • Recognition of Non-Formal Learning
    • Project Specific Domain
    • Monetize Facilitation of Critical Judgment
    • Sharing Culture
  • Informal Learning
  • Personal Learning Environment
  • Contact
    Curt Madison, PhD
    Director eLearning Program Development
    University of Alaska Fairbanks
    907-474-6537
    cjmadison@alaska.edu