Reliability Maintenance Engineering 2 - 3 Measuring Maintainability

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Reliability Maintenance Engineering Day 2 session 3 Measuring Maintainability
Three day live course focused on reliability engineering for maintenance programs. Introductory material and discussion ranging from basic tools and techniques for data analysis to considerations when building or improving a program.

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  • Defining maintainability and metrics
  • Balance between investment and value
  • Discussing reliability & maintainability
  • Balance between investment and value
  • Mastering maintainability techniques
  • The four stages[edit source | editbeta]Unconscious incompetence The individual does not understand or know how to do something and does not necessarily recognize the deficit. They may deny the usefulness of the skill. The individual must recognise their own incompetence, and the value of the new skill, before moving on to the next stage.[2] The length of time an individual spends in this stage depends on the strength of the stimulus to learn.[3]
Conscious incompetence Though the individual does not understand or know how to do something, he or she does recognize the deficit, as well as the value of a new skill in addressing the deficit. The making of mistakes can be integral to the learning process at this stage.[4]
Conscious competence The individual understands or knows how to do something. However, demonstrating the skill or knowledge requires concentration. It may be broken down into steps, and there is heavy conscious involvement in executing the new skill.[3]
Unconscious competence The individual has had so much practice with a skill that it has become "second nature" and can be performed easily. As a result, the skill can be performed while executing another task. The individual may be able to teach it to others, depending upon how and when it was learned.
  • <image of goggle girl>
  • Balance between investment and value
  • Maintaining simplicity
  • <sandbag on circuit board or rubegoldberg device>
  • Balance between investment and value
  • Increasing maintainability though design
  • Specifically, DFR describes the entire set of tools that support product and process design (typically from early in the concept stage all the way through to product obsolescence) to ensure that customer expectations for reliability are fully met throughout the life of the product with low overall life-cycle costs. In other words, DFR is a systematic, streamlined, concurrent engineering program in which reliability engineering is weaved into the total development cycle.
  • http://www.theriac.org/DeskReference/viewDocument.php?id=222Note:"Maintenance Costs % of Total Costs" is the annual maintenance cost as a percentage of total annual plant costs."Maintenance Costs % of Plant Replacement Value" is the maintenance cost as a percentage of plant asset replacement value at a given time.Reprinted with permission from the Plant Maintenance Resource Center. http://plant-maintenance.com/benchmarking.shtml
  • Balance between investment and value
  • Restoring and optimizing maintainability
  • Balance between investment and value
  • Reliability Maintenance Engineering 2 - 3 Measuring Maintainability

    1. 1. Reliability Engineering Fred Schenkelberg fms@fmsreliability.com
    2. 2. MEASURING AND IMPROVING MAINTAINABILITY Day 2 Session 3
    3. 3. Objectives • Defining maintainability and metrics • Discussing reliability & maintainability • Mastering maintainability techniques • Maintaining simplicity • Increasing maintainability though design • Restoring and optimizing maintainability
    4. 4. Metrics • Purpose of metrics – Making decisions – Monitoring – Comparison • What are common metrics?
    5. 5. Establishing Metrics • Business requirements • Process markers • Technically possible
    6. 6. Cascade of metrics • Profit • Throughput • Quality & Yield • Vessel Pressure
    7. 7. Metric Cautions • We always have measured this • Technology changes • Business requirements change • Customer expectations change
    8. 8. Discussion & Questions
    9. 9. How do you talk about R&M • Reliability • Availability • Maintenance • Systems, programs, people?
    10. 10. Related Metrics • Safety • Reliability • Quality • Profit
    11. 11. Poor examples • Lack of measure • Lack of resolution • Not useful for decision • Others….
    12. 12. A good metric • Actionable • Meaningful • Accurate • Repeatable
    13. 13. Discussion & Questions
    14. 14. Mastering R&M Techniques • Awareness & Practice 1. Unconscious incompleteness 2. Conscious incompleteness 3. Unconscious completeness 4. Unconscious completeness
    15. 15. Sources for Knowledge • Reading • Conferences • Training • University Programs • Webinars reliabilitycalendar.org
    16. 16. Experiments & Curiosity • An experiment a day • Failures are chance to learn • How to do this safely?
    17. 17. Novice to Expert • Individual effort • Team effort • Hierarchy of internal support
    18. 18. Discussion & Questions
    19. 19. Decision focused • If task not related to a decision or value – Why? – What can be learned? – Process improvement • Each task should have value attached
    20. 20. KISS Principle • Example of simple solutions • Review fixes and patches for ways to simply entire process • It takes work to be simple
    21. 21. Always ask why • Why is this being done • Why is this important • Why now? • Why does this work?
    22. 22. Even the paperwork • Forms, checklists, and incentives • Story of repair center and repair action form • Story of prototype process
    23. 23. Discussion & Questions
    24. 24. Design for Reliability • Set of tools to improve reliability • Systematic, streamlined, concurrent engineering program • Balance of function, cost, time to market, and reliability
    25. 25. DFR Example • Derating story • Best Practices – Environmental Testing – Stress/strength – Process control
    26. 26. Design for Maintainability A design strategy, involving both the designer and end user, with the following objective: • Identify and prioritize maintenance requirements. • Increase product availability and decrease maintenance time. • Increase customer satisfaction. • Decrease logistics burden and Life Cycle Costs.
    27. 27. DFM Example • High speed printer story http://plant-maintenance.com/benchmarking.shtml
    28. 28. Discussion & Questions
    29. 29. Restoring • Good as new • Bad as old • Somewhere between
    30. 30. Balance cost downtime uptime • Redundancy and cost • Cost of rapid repair • Finding the balance
    31. 31. Maintaining • Sustainable • Issues with routine • Prioritization methods • What works for you?
    32. 32. Reliability Management • Business objectives • Morale of workforce • Alignment of purpose
    33. 33. Discussion & Questions
    34. 34. Summary • Defining maintainability and metrics • Discussing reliability & maintainability • Mastering maintainability techniques • Maintaining simplicity • Increasing maintainability though design • Restoring and optimizing maintainability Measuring &Improving Maintainability

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