• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Protecting Your Start-Up Company's IP
 

Protecting Your Start-Up Company's IP

on

  • 1,407 views

In this presentation, FMC Partners Rob McDonald and Marlon Rajakaruna describe the importance of protecting your start-up company’s intellectual property (IP). The following topics are discussed: ...

In this presentation, FMC Partners Rob McDonald and Marlon Rajakaruna describe the importance of protecting your start-up company’s intellectual property (IP). The following topics are discussed:
- Types of Intellectual Property
- Patents
- Copyright
- Trade-marks
- Other Ways to Protect IP
- Protecting Your IP in Commercial Agreements

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,407
Views on SlideShare
1,046
Embed Views
361

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
10
Comments
0

10 Embeds 361

http://www.dentons.com 255
http://www.project-trio.com 25
http://prod1.dentons.com 21
http://prod2.dentons.com 19
http://staging-en.fmc-law.com 14
http://www.fmc-law.com 10
http://content.snrdenton.com 8
http://prod.dentons.com 7
http://192.168.150.11 1
http://phase2.dentons.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Protecting Your Start-Up Company's IP Protecting Your Start-Up Company's IP Presentation Transcript

    • Protecting Your Start‐up Company’s IP … Without it, There’s Only One Exit Event. Presented to TEC EDMONTON Edmonton, Alberta March 15, 2013 Presented by:  Rob McDonald, Partner & Marlon Rajakaruna, Partner 1
    • INTRODUCTION 2
    • •What is intellectual property?•Attributes of intellectual property;•Comparison to tangible property;•Importance of statutes. 3
    • TYPES OFINTELLECTUAL PROPERTY 4
    • •Patents•Industrial Design•Copyright•Trade‐mark•Confidential Information/Trade Secrets•Plant Breeder’s Rights•Integrated Circuit Topographies 5
    • 6
    • PATENTS 7
    • PATENTS•Patent Act•Inventions – any new and useful art, process,  machine, method of manufacture or  composition of matter, or any new and useful  improvement thereof•Novel•Non‐obvious to a person skilled in the art or  science 8
    • PATENTS (con’t)•Public Disclosure – 1 year grace period in  Canada and U.S. but fatal in other countries•Must have registration for protection•Exclusive rights to make, construct, use and  sell the invention – 20 years from filing date,  non‐renewable•First to file – compare to U.S. first to invent  America Invents Act will change this 9
    • Patents (con’t)Marking – not required, but penalties for  false markingFiling strategies – PCT filings, foreign  filings and Convention Priority 10
    • 11
    • 12
    • INDUSTRIAL DESIGNS Industrial Design Act Design of an article – features of shape,  configuration, pattern or ornament and any  combination of those features that, in a  finished article, appeal to and are judged solely  by the eye Non‐functional elements 13
    • INDUSTRIAL DESIGNS (con’t) Public Disclosure/publication – must file  application within 1 year from first publication Must have registration for protection Exclusive rights to apply the design to an  article for sale 10 years from registration date – non‐ renewable Marking ‐ Ⓓ ‐ can limit recovery of damages if  not properly marked 14
    • COPYRIGHT 15
    • Copyright• Copyright Act• New Copyright Modernization Act (November 7,  2012)• Bundle of rights – produce, reproduce, perform,  publish, telecommunicate, rent, moral rights,  neighboring rights• Copyright subsists in every original work• Works – literary, musical, dramatic, artistic  compilations• No copyright in concepts or ideas, fixation required 16
    • Copyright (con’t)•Registration not necessary for protection•Advantages to registration – presumptions,  innocent infringer defense•Marking ‐ ©, name of owner and year of  creation on publication•Exclusive rights – 50 years from death of  author (creator)•Moral rights – integrity, authorship 17
    • Copyright (con’t)
    • TRADE‐MARKS 19
    • Trade‐marks• Trade‐marks Act• Trade‐marks – a mark used to distinguish one  competitor’s products and services from those of  another• Words, phrases, logos, shapes of packaging, colours• ‐non‐traditional marks – sounds, smells, tastes, 3‐D  shapes, holograms, moving images, etc.• Bill C‐56 proposed revisions – “signs” 20
    • Trade‐mark (con’t)•Registration not necessary for protection but  scope of protection more narrow for  unregistered marks•Registered vs. unregistered marks•Exclusive rights ‐ 15 year registration with  perpetual renewals•Rights are based on first use and continued use 21
    • Trade‐marks (con’t)•Marking trade‐mark – unregistered ™ or  registered ®•Filing strategies – claiming foreign filings and  convention priority 22
    • TRADE‐MARK CHECKLIST1.   Selecting a trade‐mark___ Must be distinctive!___ Not a person’s name___ Not clearly descriptive of the product or service___ Not the name of the product or service in another language___ May be a word, logo, phrase, color or  combination of these – Strong trade‐marks are coined words, ordinary words given arbitrary  meanings, suggestive but not descriptive words – Weak trade‐marks are overly descriptive, merely descriptive and  generic words 23
    • TRADE‐MARK CHECKLIST2. Searching___ Cannot be confusing with existing registered or  pending trade‐marks that relate to the same or  similar products and services___ Should not be confusing with existing registered  corporate names or trade names___ Should not be confusing with existing unregistered  trade‐marks___ Conduct industry search___ Conduct registrability search 24
    • TRADE‐MARK CHECKLIST3. Should you register?  Consider:___  Exclusive use throughout Canada___  Importance of product or service___  Length of use (short term vs. long term)___  Estimated value of trade‐mark (licensing,  merchandising)___ Ability to enforce trade‐mark rights___  Strength of trade‐mark 25
    • TRADE‐MARK CHECKLIST4. Registration Details___  Which entity is using or intends to use the trade‐mark  (ownership)?___  Will the trade‐mark be licensed for use by other entities?___  What specific products and services are being sold using  the trade‐mark?___ When was the trade‐mark first used in commerce (for  services, the date of first advertisement; for products,  the date of first sale) 26
    • TRADE‐MARK CHECKLIST5. Using the trade‐mark___  Always capitalize at least the first letter of the trade‐ mark___  Do not pluralize trade‐marks___  Do not use trade‐marks as a verb___  Do not change the appearance of a design trade‐mark___  Use proper marking (® for registered, TM for  unregistered)___ No generic use of trade‐mark___  No use of the trade‐mark by others without license and  control___  Monitor in‐house and outside use of the trade‐mark___  Do not ignore infringements 27
    • 28
    • 29
    • 30
    • Confidential Information and Trade Secrets•No legislation, rely on common law rights•Maintaining secrecy and non‐disclosure is key•Confidentiality and non‐disclosure agreements•No registration, therefore no expiry of rights•Fiduciary duties of shareholders, management  and employees 31
    • TOP 10 IP TRAPSCOPYRIGHT 1. Ownership claim by      employee/independent contractor 2. Moral rights claims 3. Substantial similarity not just quantitative 4. Improper Assignment 32
    • TOP 10 IP TRAPS TRADE‐MARKS 5. Not registering and being restricted to  area of reputation 6. Assuming rights in corporate names and  trade‐names 7. Adopting non‐distinctive marks 8. Losing distinctiveness through loss of  control and improper licensing 33
    • TOP 10 IP TRAPSPATENT 9. Lack of ownership agreement 10. Public disclosure 34
    • OTHER WAYS TO PROTECT IP 35
    • •NDA‘s•Other Security Measures•IP Assignment Agreements•Corporate Structure•Monitoring Infringement 36
    • NDA’s• What is a Trade Secret? Confidential information that retains  its value by being confidential – Software – Client Lists  – Procedures / methods / recipes• No statutory rules or protection ‐ any rights or protection  comes from contractual arrangements and the common law• Protection lasts for as long as the secrecy is maintained 37
    • NDA’s WITH THIRD PARTIES• Confidentiality clauses and non‐disclosure agreements  (“NDAs”) are crucial to protecting trade secrets – When to use – Avoid the mistake of assuming an NDA is “standard” and then execute  it without careful review – Remember to address oral disclosure of information, information  gathered by observation and unmarked information of a confidential  or proprietary nature – NDAs should ensure that confidential information remains confidential  for an appropriate length of time – Carve‐outs – Watch out for IP ownership provisions – It should also address the return of files, client lists, and other  information upon termination or expiration of the agreement 38
    • NDA’s WITH EMPLOYEES AND CONTRACTORS• Can use standalone NDA or incorporate as part of EA/ICA• Remember to address oral disclosure of information,  information gathered by observation and information of  confidential or proprietary nature• NDAs should ensure that confidential information remains  confidential during term of employment/ services contract and  for an appropriate length of time after• Limit carve‐outs• It should also address the return of files, client lists, and other  information upon termination of employment/services  contract 39
    • OTHER SECURITY MEASURES• Marking of documents can help establish some protection• Internal security procedures are necessary – Physical and network security – Storage of information – Entry and exit interviews – Disclosing information on a need‐to‐know basis – Proper arrangements with independent contractors 40
    • OTHER SECURITY MEASURES (cont’d)• Trade Secrets cost as much (or as little) to protect as you are  willing to invest• It takes time and money to: – implement proper marking of documents – Physically protect data and networks – Educate employees and contractors – Monitor for misappropriation of trade secrets – Draft non‐disclosure and confidentiality agreements 41
    • IP ASSIGNMENT AGREEMENTS• At common law, independent contractors and employees own  the patent for inventions made in the course of business – Exception for employees whose job it is to invent• Consider whether the common law position needs to be  shifted ‐ can be addressed by an IP assignment agreement that  transfers ownership to the employer or the business.• As part of this transfer, ensure all IP developed in the course of  employment/services contract is transferred to the  employer/business 42
    • IP ASSIGNMENT AGREEMENTS (cont’d)• IP assignment agreements should deal with a waiver of moral  rights to ensure that the IP that can be assigned is assigned,  and that moral rights are waived.  • Confidentiality• Non‐competition? 43
    • CORPORATE STRUCTURE• Incorporate• Use separate legal entity to “own” IP• License to the various corporate affiliates• Effective creditor‐proofing• Caveat: Banks may want security over IP 44
    • MONITORING INFRINGEMENT• CIPO is not the IP police – they do not monitor how IP is being  used or stop infringement• You need to devote resources to monitoring for infringement – Determine who in the organization will be responsible to monitor – Large organizations will have a watch service to continually monitor  use of IP• Cost‐benefit analysis – if it’s really not that valuable, is it worth  registering and protecting? 45
    • PROTECTING YOUR IP IN COMMERCIAL AGREEMENTS 46
    • •“Sponsor” Initiated Research Agreements•Researcher Initiated Research Agreements•License Agreements•Contractor Agreements 47
    • “SPONSOR” INITIATED RESEARCH AGREEMENTS• Carve‐outs to Confidentiality• Background IP• Other IP developed at the same time under separate research• Fortuitous discoveries• License back• Restrictions on use of names, marks, etc 48
    • RESEARCHER INITIATED RESEARCH AGREEMENTS• Confidentiality• Background IP• Other IP developed at the same time under separate research• Fortuitous discoveries• IP developed in direct performance of research (or at least  license‐back)• Restrictions on publication 49
    • LICENSE AGREEMENTS• Narrow Scope• Confidentiality• Address ownership of new IP• Restrictions on use of names, marks, etc 50
    • CONTRACTOR AGREEMENTS• Confidentiality• Limit carve‐outs to confidentiality• Assignment of ownership of work product including IP; waiver  of moral rights• No modification of IP• Non‐competition? 51
    • Questions?Rob McDonald, Partner780 423 7305rob.mcdonald@fmc‐law.comMarlon Rajakaruna, Partner780 423 7281marlon.rajakaruna@fmc‐law.com
    • The preceding presentation deals with the kinds of  issues companies dealing with the protection of intellectual property could face. If you are faced with  one of these issues, please retain professional  assistance as each situation is unique.