FMC's Annual Employment Law Client Seminar

667 views
621 views

Published on

This presentation was delivered by FMC's Catherine Coulter at FMC's Annual Employment Law Client Appreciation Seminar on Febraury 22, 2012. It addresses new and upcoming trends in Employment Law, restrictive covenants, contractual termination packages, the 24 month cap, Bill 160, Family Caregiver Leave, The Tort of Privacy, and the Accessability for Ontarians with Disabilities Act.

Published in: Business, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
667
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

FMC's Annual Employment Law Client Seminar

  1. 1. FMC’s Annual Employment Law Client SeminarPresented by: Catherine CoulterPhone: 613-783-9660Email: Catherine.Coulter@fmc‐law.comLinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/catherine‐coulter/23/403/b3a 1
  2. 2. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR?“Watch Your Words!”• In the June decision of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice in the case of Strizzi v. Curzons, the court found that yelling and  swearing at employees can constitute constructive dismissal. 2
  3. 3. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR? Good Luck With Enforcing Restrictive Covenants• In the May 2011 Ontario Court of Appeal case of Mason v.  Chem‐Trend, the court struck down a 1 year worldwide non‐ competition agreement which precluded the employee from  working for thousands of customers, some of whom he had  never had contact with and some of whom the company  itself had not dealt with in years 3
  4. 4. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR?Duty to mitigate even in light of a contractual  termination package• In the July 2011 Ontario Superior Court of Justice case of  Bowes v. Goss Power Products, the court found that an  employer who cut off termination payments after a few days,  notwithstanding that the contract provided for a 6 month  package, was justified in doing so because the employee had  fully mitigated his damages 4
  5. 5. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR?Does the 24 month cap exist any longer?• In the November 2011 Ontario Superior Court of Justice case  of Hussain v. Suzuki Canada, the court blew past the 24 month  cap and awarded 26 months of notice to a 36 year employee  who was almost 65 years old 5
  6. 6. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR?Bill 160 Bill 160 proposes further amendments to the OHSA.  While it received Royal Assent  on June 1st, many parts of it will not come into effect until April 1, 2012.  Among  other things, Bill 160 provides that:(i) responsibility for prevention of workplace injuries and accidents has been    transferred from WSIB to the MOL;(ii) where the OHSA requires training be provided by employers, including training for   Joint Health & Safety Committees, the new Chief Prevention Officer has the  authority to establish standards for that training;(iii) the Ministry of Labour will be producing a new health and safety poster that  employers will be required to post; and(iv) it has been recommended that a standard be developed to establish health and  safety awareness training for employees at the entry level and for supervisors 6
  7. 7. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR?Family Caregiver Leave On December 8th, the Ontario Government introduced an amendment to  the ESA (Bill 30) which, if passed, would create a new Family Caregiver  Leave as of July 1, 2012.  The purpose of the leave is to give caregivers up  to 8 weeks of unpaid leave to care for a relative who is suffering from a  “serious condition”.  This is in addition to other leaves such as Family  Medical Leave (which applies when a relative is terminally ill) and  Emergency Leave (which provides for one‐off absences to deal with  sickness and other emergencies).  The provincial government has indicated  that if the Bill passes into law, it will press the federal government to  approve EI benefits for employees who are required to take Family  Caregiver Leave. 7
  8. 8. WHAT’S NEW & EXCITING THIS YEAR?The Tort of Privacy• The Ontario Court of Appeal essentially created a new tort in  January of 2012 in the case of Jones v. Tsige• The tort, which is for breach of privacy is called “intrusion  upon seclusion”• Damages for breach of privacy appear limited however, and  even in this case, which cried out for a remedy, the damages  awarded were only $10,000‐ The case has been appealed to the Supreme Court of Canada 8
  9. 9. ACCESSIBILITY FOR ONTARIANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT, 2005 (AODA):• the AODA applies to provincially regulated employers only• The AODA has 3 standards, one of which (the Customer Service Standard regulation), came into force on January 1, 2008• under the Customer Service Standard, private sector and non‐profit  organizations that provide goods & services directly to the public or to third  parties (other organizations in Ontario) and that have 1 or more employees  in Ontario, must be compliant by January 1, 2012.  The requirements also  apply to every volunteer, agent, contractor or other person in the  organization who deals with members of the public or other third parties on  behalf of the company.  The compliance date for public sector employers  was Jan. 1, 2010. 9
  10. 10. • in addition, the Integrated Accessibility Standards regulation  under AODA came into force on July 1, 2011 but with 2  exceptions, most of the deadlines for compliance are in 2014  or 2015• For help, go to:• http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/documents/en/mcss/accessibility/ Tools/AO_EmployerHandbook.pdf (employer handbook)• http://www.mcss.gov.on.ca/documents/en/mcss/accessibility/ Tools/TemplatePlan_en.pdf (template plan) 10
  11. 11. Requirements under the Customer Service Standard (as of Jan. 1, 2012):• develop general policies and procedures related providing goods and services to persons  under disability• develop general policies and procedures related to the use of service animals and support  persons• train everyone in the organization who deals with the public or third parties (ie. other  businesses)• establish a process to allow for feedback on how the organization is doing when it comes to  providing goods and services to persons under disability• if there are 20 employees or more, document not only the policies and procedures but also  the employee training records, and let the public know that they are available upon request in  an accessible format• if there are 20 employees or more, file an annual accessibility report with the provincial  government 11
  12. 12. Requirements under the new Integrated Accessibility Standard:• there are two new standards under this heading that will apply by Jan. 1,  2012:(i) employer must provide individualized workplace emergency response  information to employees who have a disability where the information is  necessary and the employer is aware of the need for accommodation;  and(ii) for organizations which prepare emergency plans and procedures and  make that information available to the public, those organizations must  provide the information in an accessible form, upon request 12
  13. 13. • the rest of the standards will be rolled out over time, depending on the size  and type of organization• develop a policy explaining how the organization will achieve accessibility  under the Act (to be in place by Jan. 1, 2013 for large public sector  companies; by Jan. 1, 2014 for small public sector and large private sector  and non‐profits; and by Jan. 1, 2015 for small private sector and non‐ profits)• provide training to all employees, contractors, agents and volunteers on  the regulation and Human Rights Code requirements in regard to persons  with disabilities (by Jan. 1, 2014 for large public sector companies; by Jan.  1, 2015 for small public sector and large private sector and non‐profits; and  by Jan. 1, 2016 for small private sector and non‐profits) 13
  14. 14. • must notify employees and the public about the availability of  accommodation for applicants with disabilities during the  recruiting process and when making offers of employment• if requested by employees, employer must provide employee  communication in an accessible format• for large private sector and non‐profits, employers must also:  (i) develop a multi‐year accessibility plan and post it on the  company’s website by Jan. 1, 2014; (ii) maintain records of  training programs to ensure compliance; (iii) establish  individualized accommodation plans; and (iv) develop a return  to work process for employees who have been absent with a  disability and require accommodation to return 14
  15. 15. • simply put, under the Employment Accessibility Standard which is part of the  Integrated Accessibility Standards, employers will, in the future, need to: (a) notify potential applicants about the availability of accommodation in  respect of disabilities (eg. add something in this regard to job postings and  application forms); (b) make it known to job applicants with disabilities, who make it past the initial  application stage, that accommodation is available through the balance of  the application process; (c) provide application accommodation where requested throughout the balance of the employment cycle, including with respect to  communications, performance assessments and career advancement  decisions• finally, it’s important to note that this standard only applies to paid employees and  not volunteers or other unpaid individuals.  In addition, it’s important to note that  the term “employee” has not been defined in this standard and as a result, we  don’t yet know whether or not it will apply to contractors 15
  16. 16. THANK YOU FOR JOINING US!  ANY QUESTIONS?Presented by: Catherine CoulterPhone: 613‐783‐9660Email: Catherine.Coulter@fmc‐law.comLinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/pub/catherine‐coulter/23/403/b3a 16
  17. 17. The preceding presentation contains examples of the kinds of examples companies dealing with HR issues could face. If you are faced with one of these issues, please retain  professional assistance as each situation is unique.

×