An Update For “In House” LobbyistsPresented by: Cyrus Reporter, Counsel FMC LLPPhone: +1 613 783 9630 Email: cyrus.reporte...
Topics1. Review of Registration Requirements for Associations2. Update: Lobbying Act 5 Year Review3. Update: Lobbyists’ Co...
Lobbying Act Preamble• Free and open access to government is an important matter of   public interest.• Lobbying public of...
What is Lobbying?Lobbying is communicating with a public office holder, for   payment in respect of:• The development of a...
Public Office Holders (POH)Means any officer or employee of Her Majesty in right of Canada and   includes:• A member of th...
Activities Not Considered Lobbying• Oral or written submissions to a parliamentary committee   where there is a public rec...
Categories of Lobbyists1. Consultant Lobbyists   A person hired to communicate on behalf of a client    (consultants, lawy...
Triggering the Requirement for an Association to Register• If total lobbying activities by employees would constitute a   ...
Registration InformationThe following information must be disclosed in an initial filing:• Name and position title of seni...
Additional Monthly DisclosuresRequired no later than 15 days after the end of every month if:• Oral and Arranged communica...
Designated Public Office Holders (DPOH)The LA defines DPOH as:• A minister of the Crown or a minister of state and any per...
Other Designated Public Office HoldersThe first eleven positions or classes of positions were designated by way of regulat...
Communications with a DPOHA communication must be disclosed in a monthly report if:• It is both oral and arranged,• It is ...
Communications with a DPOHThe monthly returns regarding communications with a DPOH  must include:• Name and position/rank ...
Penalties (Breaches of the Act)• Up to $50,000 and/or six months in jail on summary conviction• Up to $200,000 and/or two ...
Lobbying Act 5 Year Review• Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and   Ethics currently conducting a statu...
Lobbying Act 5 Year ReviewCommon recommendations include:• Creation of new administrative monetary penalties• Elimination ...
Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct & Rule 8• Code of Conduct came into effect in 1997• Complimentary to the Lobbying Act but does ...
Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct & Rule 8 • Rule 8 re: “improper influence” prohibits lobbyists from placing public   office hol...
The preceding presentation contains examples of the kinds of issues companies dealing with lobbying could face. If you are...
Thank You                     Cyrus Reporter             cyrus.reporter@fmc‐law.comhttp://ca.linkedin.com/pub/cyrus‐report...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

An Update for "In House" Lobbyists

674 views

Published on

In this presentation, Cyrus Reporter offers a review of registration requirements for associations, as well as an update on Lobbying Act 5 Year Review and Lobbyists' Code of Conduct and Rule 8.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
674
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
5
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

An Update for "In House" Lobbyists

  1. 1. An Update For “In House” LobbyistsPresented by: Cyrus Reporter, Counsel FMC LLPPhone: +1 613 783 9630 Email: cyrus.reporter@fmc‐law.comLinkedIn: http://ca.linkedin.com/pub/cyrus‐reporter/2/842/414 1
  2. 2. Topics1. Review of Registration Requirements for Associations2. Update: Lobbying Act 5 Year Review3. Update: Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct & Rule 8 2
  3. 3. Lobbying Act Preamble• Free and open access to government is an important matter of  public interest.• Lobbying public office holders is a legitimate activity.• It is desirable that public office holders and the public be able  to know who is engaged in lobbying activities.• The system for the registration of paid lobbyists should not  impede free and open access to government. 3
  4. 4. What is Lobbying?Lobbying is communicating with a public office holder, for  payment in respect of:• The development of any legislative proposal,• Introduction, defeat or amendment of any Bill or resolution,• Making or amendment of any regulation,• Development or amendment of any policy or program,• Awarding of any grant, contribution or other financial benefit,• Awarding of any contract (consultants),• Arranging a meeting between a public office holder and any  other person. (consultants) 4
  5. 5. Public Office Holders (POH)Means any officer or employee of Her Majesty in right of Canada and  includes:• A member of the Senate or the House of Commons and any person on the  staff of such a member,• A person who is appointed to any office or body or with the approval of the  Governor in Council or a minister of the Crown, other than a judge  receiving a salary under the Judges Act or the lieutenant governor of a  province,• An officer, director or employee of any federal board, commission or other  tribunal as defined in the Federal Courts Act,• A member of the Canadian Armed Forces, and• A member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. 5
  6. 6. Activities Not Considered Lobbying• Oral or written submissions to a parliamentary committee  where there is a public record• Oral or written submissions made to any person or body which  has jurisdiction under a federal statute, in proceedings that are  a matter of public record• Oral or written communication made to a public office holder  with respect to the enforcement, interpretation, or application  of any existing federal statute or regulation by that official• Oral or written communication made to the public office  holder if the communication is restricted to a simple request  for information 6
  7. 7. Categories of Lobbyists1. Consultant Lobbyists A person hired to communicate on behalf of a client  (consultants, lawyers, accountants etc)2. In House Lobbyists (Corporation) An employee of a “for profit” entity who lobbies to an extent  described in the Act.3. In House Lobbyist (Organization) An employee of a “not for profit” entity who lobbies to an  extent described in the Act. 7
  8. 8. Triggering the Requirement for an Association to Register• If total lobbying activities by employees would constitute a  significant part of the duties of a single equivalent employee• “Significant part” is deemed to be 20% over a month period• Activities include preparation for lobbying• Registration for the organization must be filed not later than  two months after the day on which the requirement to file  arises• Registration is the responsibility of the most senior paid  executive of the organization 8
  9. 9. Registration InformationThe following information must be disclosed in an initial filing:• Name and position title of senior officer;• Name and business address for organization;• General description of organization’s activities;• General description of organization’s membership;• Names of employees who lobby including, as applicable, the senior officer;• Indication if employees are former public office holders, designated public  office holders, former transition team members and if exemptions granted;• Details re: subject matters including legislation, bills or resolutions,  regulations, policies, programs, grants, contributions or other financial  benefit sought;• Name of government department or other institution lobbied;• Source and amount of any government funding provided as well as  expectation of funding; and• Communication techniques used, including grassroots lobbying 9
  10. 10. Additional Monthly DisclosuresRequired no later than 15 days after the end of every month if:• Oral and Arranged communication with a Designated Public Office Holder (DPOH) took place during the month being  reported upon,• Information contained in an active return is no longer correct  or additional information that the lobbyist has become aware  of should be included in an active return,• The lobbying activities have terminated or no longer require  registration,• Five months have elapsed since the end of the last month in  which a return was filed. 10
  11. 11. Designated Public Office Holders (DPOH)The LA defines DPOH as:• A minister of the Crown or a minister of state and any person  employed in his or her office who is appointed under  subsection 128(1) of the Public Service Employment Act,• Any other public office holder who, in a department within the  meaning of paragraph (a), (a.1) or (d) of the definition  “department” in section 2 of the Financial Administration Act: – occupies the senior executive position, whether by the title of deputy  minister, chief executive officer or by some other title, or – is an associate deputy minister or an assistant deputy minister or  occupies a position of comparable rank, and – Any individual who occupies a position that has been designated by  regulation under the provisions of the Lobbying Act. 11
  12. 12. Other Designated Public Office HoldersThe first eleven positions or classes of positions were designated by way of regulation on July 2, 2008:• Chief of the Defence Staff• Vice Chief of the Defence Staff• Chief of Maritime Staff• Chief of Land Staff• Chief of Air Staff• Chief of Military Personnel• Judge Advocate General• Any positions of Senior Advisor to the Privy Council Office to which the office holder is appointed by the  Governor in Council• Deputy Minister (Intergovernmental Affairs) Privy Council Office• Comptroller General of Canada• Any position to which the office holder is appointed pursuant to paragraph 127.1(1)(a) or (b) of the Public  Service Employment ActThe next three positions or classes of positions were designated by way of regulation on September 20,  2010:• Members of Parliament• Senators• Staff working in the offices of the Leader of the Opposition in the House of Commons and in the Senate,  appointed pursuant to subsection 128(1) of the Public Service Employment Act. 12
  13. 13. Communications with a DPOHA communication must be disclosed in a monthly report if:• It is both oral and arranged,• It is requested by the lobbyist,• There is a time interval between the request and the  communication,• The arranged communication is: – A phone conversation, – A meeting, – Any other oral communications.• It is initiated by a DPOH when the subject matter refers to the  awarding of grants, contributions or other financial benefits  and the awarding of any contract. 13
  14. 14. Communications with a DPOHThe monthly returns regarding communications with a DPOH  must include:• Name and position/rank of DPOH,• Government institution of DPOH,• Date of the communication,• Subject matter of the communication,The Commissioner may verify with DPOH the content of the  monthly return. 14
  15. 15. Penalties (Breaches of the Act)• Up to $50,000 and/or six months in jail on summary conviction• Up to $200,000 and/or two years in jail on indictment• Proceedings by way of summary conviction: – may be instituted at any time within but not later than five years after the day  on which the Commissioner became aware of the subject matter of the  proceedings, and – not later than ten years after the day on which the subject‐matter of the  proceedings arose. Note: The above penalties apply to every individual who fails to file a return or  who knowingly makes any false or misleading statement in any return or other  document submitted to the Commissioner, including a DPOH or a former  DPOH who is asked to verify a monthly communications report. 15
  16. 16. Lobbying Act 5 Year Review• Standing Committee on Access to Information, Privacy and  Ethics currently conducting a statutory review of the Act• Hearings began Dec. 13, 2011• Over 20 witnesses so far including the federal Commissioner,  provincial authorities, CBA• Final witnesses will be heard next week 16
  17. 17. Lobbying Act 5 Year ReviewCommon recommendations include:• Creation of new administrative monetary penalties• Elimination for “significant part of duties” test• Improving transparency of “monthly reports”• Harmonizing filing requirements for organizations and  corporations• Changing the requirement for Board Directors to register  (including not for profit) 17
  18. 18. Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct & Rule 8• Code of Conduct came into effect in 1997• Complimentary to the Lobbying Act but does not have effect of  legislation• Purpose is to ensure that lobbying occurs at highest possible  ethical level• Like similar Codes it lays out objectives and goals without  prescribing specific standards• The Code lays out eight “rules” or objectives 18
  19. 19. Lobbyists’ Code of Conduct & Rule 8 • Rule 8 re: “improper influence” prohibits lobbyists from placing public  office holders in a conflict of interest or a perceived conflict of interest• Recent rulings by Commissioner have caused great concern• Opinions and 2009 Federal Court of Appeal case may put into question  ability of lobbyists to engage in certain political activities• What constitutes a breach would depend on the facts in each case• Key is creating a “tension” between a public office holder’s public duties vs  a private obligation that could be created by a lobbyist’s activities• Issue has been forcefully argued at Standing Committee hearings 19
  20. 20. The preceding presentation contains examples of the kinds of issues companies dealing with lobbying could face. If you are faced with one of these issues, please retain professional assistance as each situation is unique.
  21. 21. Thank You Cyrus Reporter cyrus.reporter@fmc‐law.comhttp://ca.linkedin.com/pub/cyrus‐reporter/2/842/414 +1 613 783 9630 

×