International Higher Education Trends 2012
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International Higher Education Trends 2012 International Higher Education Trends 2012 Document Transcript

  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu 2 1 0 2 , 6 h cr a M Z A , n o s c u T Francisco Marmolejo Consortium for North American Higher Education Collaboration The University of Arizona “When I think about the future… I become scared of the present”http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 1
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 2
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 3
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu …Implications for higher educationhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 4
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu International trends in higher education Massification Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The research environment Information and communications technologyhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 5
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu The demographic factor 2050 1999 1927 1800 9 6 2 1 billion people Courtesy of Paul E. Lingenfelterhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 6
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu 10000 9000 8000 7000 6000 5000 Millions 4000 3000 2000 1000 0 0 250 500 750 1000 1250 1500 1750 2000 2250 http://www.beerkens.info/blog/atom.xml …Geographic distributionhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 7
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu http://www.beerkens.info/blog/atom.xml …Population distribution The fastest population growth in world’s history… and more unequal 256 % 140 % 2.5 %http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 8
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu ¿Where are located Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Pakistan, Uganda, Nigeria, Vietnam and the Democratic Republic of Congo? World’s most populated countries. 1950-2050 RANK COUNTRY 1950 COUNTRY 2000 COUNTRY 2050 1 China 554.8 China 1,275.2 India 1,531.4 2 India 357.6 India 1,016.9 China 1,395.2 3 USA. 157.8 USA 285.0 USA 408.7 4 Russian Federation 102.7 Indonesia 211.6 Pakistan 348.7 5 Japan 83.6 Brazil 171.8 Indonesia 293.8 6 Indonesia 79.5 Russia 145.6 Nigeria 258.5 7 Germany 68.4 Pakistan 142.7 Bangladesh 254.6 8 Brazil 54.0 Bangladesh 138.0 Brazil 233.1 9 Great Britan 49.8 Japan 127.0 Ethiopia 171.0 10 Italy 47.1 Nigeria 114.7 DR Congo 151.6 11 France 41.8 MEXICO 98.9 MEXICO 140.2 12 Bangladesh 41.8 Germany 82.3 Egypt 127.4 13 Ukraine 37.3 Philipines 75.7 Vietnam 117.7 14 Nigeria 29.8 Turkey 68.3 Japan 109.7 15 Spain 28.0 Egypt 67.8 Iran 105.5 16 MEXICO 27.7 Iran 66.4 Uganda 103.2 Fuente: ONU (2004). World Population to 2300.http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 9
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu - +http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 10
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu - +http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 11
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu “La globalización ha traido consigo el surgimiento de un riesgoso régimen globalitario que ha provocado una espectacular multinacionalización de la economía y una aculturización” IGNACIO RAMONET “Géopolitique du chaos” (1999) Costos Beneficios http://conahec.org Latin America and the Caribbean Sub-Saharan Africa East and Pacific Asia North Africa and Middle East South Asia High Income Countries 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 Source: Luis F. Lopez-Calva y N. Lusing 0: Equity of Total Income 1: Inequity of Total Incomehttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 12
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Dominique Moisi. Geopolitics of Emotions (2009)http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 13
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 14
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu More than ever more people are having access to higher education …http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 15
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Gross enrollment rate in Brazilian Higher Education Tasa Bruta de Cobertura 30% 25% 24,7% 20% 15% 10% 7,8% 5% 0% 1997 2009 Tasa Bruta 7,8% 24,7%http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 16
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Chile Undergraduate Enrollment 1983-2009 Graduate Enrolllment 1983-2009 Source: Aliaga y col., SIES, Junio 210http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 17
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 18
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Evolución de la Estructura de Edad de la Población en México Edad Hombres Mujeres 100 2000 80 60 40 20 0 0 100 2020 80 60 40 20 0 0 2050 100 80 60 40 20 0 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Millones de Personas http://conahec.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 19
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu The demographic structure from a regional point of view Age 90-94 80-84 70-74 60-64 50-54 40-44 Canada 30-34 20-24 Mexico 10-14 USA 0-4 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Millions of inhabitants Sourcee: Jaime Parada, CONACYT Growth in university-level qualifications Approximated by the percentage of the population that has attained tertiary-type A education in the age groups 25-34 years, 35-44 years, 45-54 years and 55-64 years) (2007) 2000s 1990s 1980s 1970s 50 % 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 Belgium Turkey Switzerland United Kingdom Luxembourg Slovak Republic Brazil OECD average Japan EU19 average France Chile Canada Sweden Denmark Spain United States Estonia Australia Netherlands Slovenia Austria Korea New Zealand Finland Norway Germany Iceland Ireland Hungary Poland Italy Czech Republic Portugal Greece Mexicohttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 20
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 21
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 22
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 23
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu http://conahec.org http://www.beerkens.info/blog/atom.xmlhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 24
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Rank change Order in 2050 between 2012 by size and 2050 1 China 2 2 US -1 3 India 5 4 Japan -2 5 Germany -1 6 UK -1 7 Brazil 2 8 Mexico 5 9 France -3 10 Canada 0 11 Italy -4 12 Turkey 6 13 S. Korea -2 14 Spain -2 15 Russia 2 16 Indonesia 5 17 Australia -3 18 Argentina -2 19 Egypt 16 20 Malaysia 17 Source: HSBC Global Research Unit. http://www.hsbcnet.com/gbm/global-insights/insights/2011/world-in-2050.html# 2010 USA 2005 CANADA MEXICO 2000 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: OECD Factbook 2012http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 25
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu (*): GDP equivalent based on PPP Source: OECD. Education at a Glance 2010http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 26
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Public vs. private higher education institutions in Brazil Número de Ins tuiciones en la Educación Superior - Brasil 1997-2009 2.500 2.160 2.000 1.500 1.000 689 500 252 211 0 1997 2009 En Sector Privado 689 2.160 En Sector Público 211 252 Out of 2.412 HEIs in Brazil, only 252 are publichttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 27
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 28
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Fuente: Parada, J. Science and Technology Policy in Mexico. 2003 . Mundo Países OCDE EUA Japón Alemania Francia Corea del Sur Inglaterra Holanda China Mundo: 47,022 Canadá EUA: 13,715 Israel India México: 13 Noruega Brasil Nueva Zelanda Portugal República Checa México 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 29
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Mobility Providers Rankings of higher education Curriculum • Increased mobility (intra/inter) One • Internationalization adopted in the institutional rhetoric • Massive private investment on education Two • Towards more international quality assurance frameworks Three • The role of rankings Four • Technology as means for “virtual” mobility Five • Proliferation of dual/joint degrees • Timid efforts with second language Six • Some good practices. Some hope Sevenhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 30
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Differences in The endless history, structure, dichotomies responses. John Hudzikhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 31
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu It is essential that it be embraced by It shapes institutional ethos and values and institutional leadership, governance, touches the entire higher education faculty, students, and all academic service enterprise. and support units. COMPREHENSIVE INTERNATIONALIZATION The global reconfiguration of economies, systems of trade, research, and Not only impacts all of campus life but the communication, and the impact of global institution’s external frames of reference, forces on local life, dramatically expand the partnerships, and relations. need for comprehensive internationalization and the motivations and purposes driving it. John Hudzikhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 32
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 33
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu More than 3.3 million students abroad. It is forecasted that by 2020 there will be 7 million international students. . 1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2004 2006 2008 Source: OECD and UNESCO Institute for Statistics (for data on non-OECD countries and up to 1995).http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 34
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu • It is forecasted that by 2020 the number will increase to 7 million international students 2009 OECD average % 22 20 18 16 14 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Hungary Portugal Canada¹ Estonia Sweden Denmark Japan Spain Netherlands United States Norway Poland United Kingdom New Zealand Belgium Switzerland Ireland Iceland Finland Slovak Republic Chile Australia Austria Sloveniahttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 35
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Major players: U.S.A., U.K. and Australia Middle powers: France, Germany, Spain, Italy Evolving destinations: Canada, New Zealand, Japan Emerging contenders: Malaysia, China, Singapore Source: Verbik, L. et al. (2007) International Student Mobility: Patterns and Trends. The Observatory on Borderless Higher Educationhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 36
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Korea: 4.6% India: 6.8% China: 17.1% Source: OECD Education at a Glance 2010http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 37
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu 2006 2002 Other Austria OCDE 9% 2% Italy Swiss 2% 2% U.S.A. Belgium 20% 2% Spain 2% Japan England 4% 14% France 9% Germany 12% Australia 10%http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 38
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu USE OF ENGLISH LANGUAGE COUNTRIES IN INSTRUCTION All or nearly all education programs Australia, Canada, Ireland, N.Zealand, U.K., U.S.A. Many education programs Denmark, Finland, Netherlands, Sweden Some education programs Belgium (Fl.), Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Iceland, Japan, Korea, Norway, Poland, Slovak R., Switzerland, Turkey None or nearly no education programs Austria, Belgium (Fr.), Greece, Italy, Luxembourg, Mexico, Portugal, Spain, Brazil, Chile, Israel, Russian Federation Source: OECD Education at a Glance 2006http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 39
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu TUITION FEE STRUCTURE COUNTRIES Higher tuition for international students than for Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Ireland, domestic students Netherlands, New Zealand, Slovak Republic, Turkey, United Kingdom1, United States Same tuition for international and domestic France, Greece, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea, Mexico, students Portugal, Spain, Switzerland No tuition for either international or domestic Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, students Sweden A worldwide “industry” generating more than 20 billion USD annually Source: OECD Education at a Glance 2006 and 2010http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 40
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 41
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Cultural/experiential Increased Mobility still mostly: “Brain-drain” goals and means: commodification: Questionable For the better-off Quality practices. (The Brain-circulation? students Assurance “bubble” effect) The role of The “time- To the better-off governments, compression” Money talks countries companies and factor universities Regulations? Students traveling abroad for a short period of time with their “imported” teacher, remaining together, continuing to speak mainly their own language even while abroad, and having just a superficial glimpse at the foreign culture and peoplehttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 42
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu More than half of the U.S. students who go abroad only participate in a short term program (IIE, 2010) Cultural/experiential Increased Mobility still mostly: “Brain-drain” goals and means: commodification: Questionable For the better-off Quality practices. (The Brain-circulation? students Assurance “bubble” effect) The role of The “time- To the better-off governments, compression” Money talks countries companies and factor universities Regulations?http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 43
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Share of a country’s national with a university education who live in an(other) OECD country Only 30 % of Africans studying abroad return to the region after graduation Jamil Salmi Note: The emigration rate of highly educated persons from country i is calculated by dividing the highly educated expatriate population from country of origin i by the total highly educated native-born population of the same country (Highly educated native-born(i)= Expatriates(i) + Resident native born(i)). Highly educated persons correspond to those with a tertiary level of education. Source: OECD Database on Foreign Born and Expatriates; Employment, Labour and Social Affairs, 2006 and Cohen D. and M. Soto, 2001, Growth and Human Capital: Good Data, Good Results, OECD Development Centre WP n°179. F. Marmolejo, S. Manley y S. Vincent-Lancrin Immigration and access to tertiary education: Integration or marginalisation?” OECD, 2009http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 44
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Nunnally Johnson The Grapes of Wrath (1940)http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 45
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Competency Important Achieved Ethical commitment 3.76 3.0 Most Commitment to quality 3.72 2.91 important Ability to learn and adapt learning 3.68 2.94 Ability to apply knowledge in practice 3.66 2.84 Ability to identify, pose and solve problems 3.65 2.92 Competency Important Achieved Capacity for research 3.4 2.76 Less Commitment to socio-cult. environment 3.37 2.71 important Comm. to look after the environment 3.27 2.45 Ability to work in international context 3.15 2.30 Ability to communicate in a 2nd. language 3.11 2.06 Source: Final Report Tuning Latin America. (2007) . http://www.tuning.unideusto.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 46
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Source: IAU (2010)http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 47
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu By the year 2050 the most widely spoken languages in the world will be: • 1 Mandarin • 2 Spanish • 3= English • 3= Hindi/Urdu • 3= Arabic. Even considering English as the lingua franca of business, Mark Davis back in 2004 did an interesting breakdown of the percentages of world GDP by language. He calculated that by 2010 English would represent only 28 percent of the global market, followed by Chinese, Japanese, German and Spanish. Fonte: English Next (2007). The British Council 1400 1200 Arabic Spanish 1000 English Hindu-Urdu 800 Chinese Chinese 600 Hindu-Urdu 400 English 200 Spanish Arabic 0 1950 2000 2050 Source: David Graddol. The Future of English? (London: British Council, 1997). Foreign Policy. Nov-Dec. 2003. No. 139http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 48
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Fonte: English Next (2007). The British Council The role agents Institutional & Authenticity of community credentials preparedness Financial/political International domestic quality implications frameworks The influence of public policyhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 49
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 50
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 51
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Source: SIL International. http://www.sil.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 52
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Fuente: English Next (2007). The British Council 1: Noruega. 69.09 18: Mexico. 51.48 44: Kazajstán 31.64http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 53
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu 1400 1200 Arabic Spanish 1000 English Hindu-Urdu 800 Chinese Chinese 600 Hindu-Urdu 400 English 200 Spanish Arabic 0 1950 2000 2050 Source: David Graddol. The Future of English? (London: British Council, 1997). Foreign Policy. Nov-Dec. 2003. No. 139 Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Fuente: English Next (2007). The British Councilhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 54
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Source: Ronald Inglehart and Christian Welzel. Modernization, Cultural Change and Democracy. New York, Cambridge University Press, 2005: p. 64 based on the World Values Surveys. http://conahec.org Steve Breen. The San Diego Union-Tribunehttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 55
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu A new type of students Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 56
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.edu ¿Sequential? Multi-task?http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 57
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 58
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 59
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu d wA dis teacha wrks S borin. U@? PTMN bout r teacha S lamo. Jst B dis teacha. I N K Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Where are you? The way this teacher works is Please tell me now boring. Our teacher is an idiot. about this teacher. Just bla, bla, bla. I need to know Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 60
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu GEOMETRY Defina what a circle is: It is a line connected by two ends making a round figure. What is Trigonometry?: Device used to measure trigonometers. HISTORIA Who was Simón Bolivar? The Prince of Boliviahttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 61
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu THE HUMAN BODY What are the movements of the heart?: The heart is always in movement. It doesn’t move in the case of corpses only. Brain: Ideas, after being spoken, go straight to the brain.http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 62
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu I have a netbook, MP3 Players, flashdrive, IPAD… Dad, what did you use in school? My brain!! Col um Colu mn2 n… ,, 99… Gajaraj Dhanarajan Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 63
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu http://www.worldmapper.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 64
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 65
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Pew Internet & American Life: US educators not Net- savvy Aug 14 2002: A new study from Pew 80 Internet & American Life indicates that 78 percent of middle and 60 high school students in the US use the 40 37 Internet. NO YES However, most 20 63 American teenagers NO claim that educators 0 YES often don’t know how, don’t want, or aren’t able to use online % tools to help them learn or enrich their Source: Market Facts/TeleNation for GTE Directories. USA Today. Sep. 24-98 studies. Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.edu http://conahec.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 66
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu In a traditional setting: The University Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 67
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Towards a new University Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 68
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu More international, but more locally connected and socially responsible. More flexible More innovative More entrepreneur More critical of the status-quo More collaborative (inside and outside) Graduates required in today’s world Habilidades Técnicas Source: Business Council of British Columbiahttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 69
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu There is no magic formula… What it may work in one case …it is not necessarily the best solution in other cases What are the major forces or What are the factors that are major barriers encouraging Are there that need to be institutions to examples of overcomed? become more What are the institutions internationalized longer-term moving in this possibilities for direction? How building to use them? comprehensive and sustainable partnerships?http://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 70
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Just a good idea A critical need Source of prestige and “sell” Survival tool Non practical Highly practical Marginal Beneficial A priority for “tomorrow” Priority for “yesterday” http://conahec.org Preparing students with global awareness and competitiveness but also with social consciousness and greater sense of social responsibility? Strengthening the cooperation among higher education institutions and their surrounding communities, nationally and internationally? Implementing mechanisms for a better understanding, awareness and respect? Innovating? Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 71
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 72
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 73
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu CONAHEC was created In 1994 as the U.S.-Mexico Educational Interchange Projecthttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 74
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Collaboration Cooperation Community-building among higher education institutions in North America …and beyond http://conahec.org 150+ Institutions and Higher Education Organizations In North America… and beyond • Argentina CONAHEC’s • Brazil memberships’ • Chile • Colombia total enrollment • Dominican Republic represents • Ecuador • Honduras 2.5+ million students • Iceland • Malaysia On more than • Spain • South Korea 250 campi •Burkina Fasohttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 75
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu http://conahec.org There is no better or worst.. It is just different There is always someone else with a similar interest The node network is not the office in Tucson, but each member institution http://conahec.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 76
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu A Strategic Alliance fo no ta cossA fo no ta cossA fo noiiiitaiiiicossA fo no ta cossA naidanaC ytiiinummoC yt nummoC yt nummoC sege oC segelllloC segelllloC sege oC Our most popular services Networking. “Dating service” (Match-making) Exchange of “empty seats” (Student Exchange) Promotion / Awareness / Training Resource center for administrators / faculty / students Assisting member institutions in developing/implementing/evaluating partnership arrangements with peer institutionshttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 77
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu North American “Dating Service” • student internships • research • intensive language • study abroad programs • faculty sabbaticals, • institutional partnerships fellowships, and exchanges • funding opportunities • leadership training for administrators • business higher education partnerships • consulting for higher education or business • requests for partner institutions to collaborate • job offers (students, on specific projects faculty) Learn new approaches Share expertise Connect with partners for collaborationhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 78
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Undergraduate and graduate levels Multi-institutional, multi-level Costs. Tuition Swaps Credit Recognition Electronically based exchange program http://conahec.org “Service Learning” based student exchanges More asymmetrical than today Faculty exchanges (based on institutional needs) Staff exchanges (in conjunction with Compostela Group of Universities’ STELLA Program) http://conahec.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 79
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Opportunity to involve students Future leaders Ambassadors and advocates Venues: Regional Chapters Conference Educational Resource Center for Hispanics in the U.S. unable to attend “traditional” institutions due to: Language issues (Spanish as preferred language of communication) Age Limited financial resources Time constraints Lack of appropriate documents Educational backgroundhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 80
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu http://conahec.org Una nota final “ Lo que nos desconcierta en nuestros tiempos es que el futuro ya no es lo que solía ser ” Paul Valéryhttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 81
  • Francisco Marmolejo 3/8/2012fmarmole@email.arizona.edu Francisco J. Marmolejo Executive Director Consortium for North American Higher Education Collaboration (CONAHEC) University of Arizona Tucson, AZ 85721-0300 U.S.A. Tel. (520) 621-9080 / Fax (520) 626-2675 E.mail: fmarmole@email.arizona.edu WWW: http://conahec.orghttp://www.conahec.orghttp://www.arizona.edu 82