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WW2 Women

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  • 1. PowerPoint Show by Andrew
  • 2. “Rosie the Riveter” While women worked in a variety of positions previously closed to them, the aviation industry saw the greatest increase in female workers. More than 310,000 women worked in the U.S. aircraft industry in 1943, representing 65 percent of the industry's total workforce (compared to just 1 percent in the pre-war years). The strong, bandanna-clad Rosie became one of the most successful recruitment tools in American history, and the most iconic image of working women during World War II.
  • 3. Part of the cowling for one of the motors for a B-25 bomber is assembled
  • 4. Women install fixtures and assemblies to a tail fuselage of a B-17F bomber.
  • 5. Working on a Vengeance•dive-bomber at Vultee-Nashville - 1943
  • 6. Riveting team working on the cockpit shell of a C-47 heavy transport 1942
  • 7. October 1942. Women become skilled shop technicians after careful training in the school at the Douglas Aircraft Company.
  • 8. February 1943. Working on a Vengeance dive bomber at Vultee Aircraft in Nashville, Tennessee.
  • 9. Women at work on a bomber, Douglas Aircraft Company.
  • 10. August 1942 - Painting the star on a fighter plane.
  • 11. Girl on a riveting machine joins sections of wing ribs to reinforce the inner wing assemblies of B-17F heavy bombers - 1942
  • 12. February 1943 - Working on the horizontal stabilizer of a Vengeance dive bomber.
  • 13. Women are trained to do precise and vital engine installations. - 1942
  • 14. October 1942. Lathe operator machining parts for transport planes.
  • 15. Young woman employee of North American Aviation working on the landing gear mechanism of a P-51 fighter plane - 1942
  • 16. February 1943. Mrs. Mary Betchner measuring 105mm howitzers at the Milwaukee, Wisconsin, plant of the Chain Belt Company.
  • 17. Bombardier nose section of a B-17F Navy bomber – October, 1942
  • 18. A view of the B-25 final assembly line at North American Aviation plant. 1942.
  • 19. B-25 bomber planes at the North American Aviation, being hauled along an outdoor assembly line in Kansas City, Kansas, in October, 1942.