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Historyofcookiesslideshow

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The History of cookies

The History of cookies

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  • 1. What is a cookie, And where did it come from?
  • 2. Cookie: a small sweet cake.
  • 3. Cookies are usually small,round, flat and crisp!
  • 4. There are many types and kinds of cookies today….**** different cookies collage
  • 5. But where did thesecookies come from?
  • 6. The first cookie was created by accident!
  • 7. The Dutch would test theiroven temperature by usinga small amount of cakebatter.
  • 8. “Koekje” is what the Dutch called it, AKA “little cake”
  • 9. The first cookieswere made without sugar!
  • 10. By the end of the 1400s they were growing more popular!
  • 11. You could buy themin the streets of Paris.
  • 12. They were mainly for traveling at firstbecause they stayed fresh for longperiods of time.
  • 13. As people began traveling, cookies were their main food source.
  • 14. Dutch, English, and Scottish immigrants brought cookies to the US in the 1600s.
  • 15. Butter cookies todayresemble the first English teacakes and Scottish Shortbread.
  • 16. By the 1700s Koekje evolved in the word cookie or cookey.
  • 17. British loved them, incorporating them into their daily tea gatherings.
  • 18. They would call them biscuits or sweet buns.
  • 19. Often only flavored with nothing morethan butter or a drop of rose water.
  • 20. During the 17th and 18th centuriescookies were baked at home as specialtreats.
  • 21. Sugar was very expensiveand a lot of labor wasput in to baking cookies.
  • 22. The 19th century was huge for baking cookies!
  • 23. Sugar and flourbecame affordable.
  • 24. Chemical rising agents were developed.
  • 25. Modern ovenswere introduced,with thermostats!
  • 26. This allowed for the creationof many different types of cookies!
  • 27. Cookie recipes used to be hidden in the back of the recipe books, but as things became more modern, so did cook books!
  • 28. Cookies began to have their own sections in cookbooks!
  • 29. Mainly cookies were bakedwith nuts or raisins.
  • 30. It wasn’t until 1937 when Ruth Wakefield ran out of nuts.
  • 31. She substituted with a bar of baking chocolate.
  • 32. This is where The Toll House Cookiegot its name!
  • 33. From Ruth’sRestaurant, The Toll House Restaurant.
  • 34. She and her husband owned an Inn that was located next to a train track, perfect for travelers.
  • 35. Many travelers would stop and eat at her restaurant.
  • 36. Ruth’s cookies were becoming well known.
  • 37. With the help ofBetty Crocker, Ruth’scookies becamenationally known.
  • 38. Betty Crocker had a radio station and did a segment on “Famous Foods From Famous Eating Places.”
  • 39. In 1939 Ruth madean agreement with Nestle.
  • 40. They could print her recipe on their package of chocolate!
  • 41. They made a special new chocolate bar that the recipe would be printed on.
  • 42. The new chocolate bar was scored; it made for easy cutting at home.
  • 43. In return she got a lifetime supply ofchocolate to bake her famous cookies!
  • 44. In 1940 Ruth sold her legal rights of the Toll House cookie to Nestle.
  • 45. Forty years later….
  • 46. Nestle lost its exclusive rightto the trademark in federal court.
  • 47. Now Tollhouse is known as a descriptive term for a cookie.
  • 48. Today more than halfthe cookies baked athome are chocolate chip cookies.
  • 49. Cookies are consumed in95.2 percent of US households.
  • 50. Americans alone consume over 2 billion cookies a year….
  • 51. Or 300 Cookies foreach person annually!
  • 52. Now you know when and where cookies have evolved from!
  • 53. ReferencesBlock, S., & Holloway, S. (1998). The Kitchen Project. Retrieved from http://www.kitchenproject.com/history/cookies.htmStradley, L. (2004). History of Cookies – Cookie History. Retrieved from http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/CookieHistory.h tmHockman, K., Gilman, R., & Katz, R. (n.d). History of Cookies. Retrieved from http://www.thenibble.com/reviews/main/cookies/cooki es2/cookie-history2.asp
  • 54. References Cont’Slide 4Sylvie Bouchard. (Photographer). (2008). Stock Photo – Close-up of a pile of different cookies isolated on white. Mmm. [Photo]. Retrieved October, 6th, 2012, from:http://www.123rf.com/photo_7267469_close-up-of-a-pile-of-different-cookies-isolated-on-white-mmm.htmlSlide 7Katrina Markoff. (Baker). (2012). Cake Parchment Pour. [Photo]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012 from:http://www.peaceloveandchocolate.com/Slide 9Tess Hunt. (2012). Ban Sugar. [Photo]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012 from: http://tesshuntrkc.wordpress.com/page/8/Slide 11Charles Marville. (1865). Rue de Constantine, Paris. [Photo]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012 from: http://wonderfulambiguity.tumblr.com/post/7340694375/charles- marville-rue-de-constantine-parisSlide 12[Calendar]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://azamrussiakita.blogspot.com/2012/04/lets-plan-effective-timetable.htmlSlide 14Bulk Organic Berries & Nuts Blend. [Photo]. (2010). Retrieved October 7th, 2012 from: http://fruitsstar.com/bulk-organic-berries-nuts-blend-pi-794.htmlSlide 20Renee Comet. (Author for National Cancer Institute). (1994). Butter and a butter knife. [Photo], Retrieved October 7th, 2012 from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:NCI_butter.jpgSlide 21[Housewife Cooking]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://talesofaretromodernhousewife.blogspot.com/2011/09/weekly-menu-plan-918-922.html
  • 55. References Cont’slide 22[Housewife baking]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://lifesafeast.blogspot.com/2009/11/one-day-one-cake-at-time.htmlSlide 24[A bag of sugar]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://tfhomes.blogspot.com/2010/07/spoonful-of-sugar.htmlSlide 25[Baking Soda Box]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2009/12/15/baking-soda- used-to-treat-swine-flu-85-years-ago.aspxSlide 26Christian Maupin. [Vintage Stove]. (2010). Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://dreamstoves.com/index.htmlSlide 27Borja Fernandez. (Baker). (2009). Collage2. [Photo]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://lisamichele.wordpress.com/tag/chocolate-chip-walnut-cookies/Slide 29Kate Greenway. (Graphics Designer). (2009). [Photo]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://be-it-ever-so- humble.blogspot.com/2009/05/vintage-cookies-coconut-crunchies.html Slide 32Shannon. (2012). Chocolate avalanche. [Photo]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://aperiodictableblog.com/wp- content/uploads/2012/06/chocolate-chopped.jpgSlide 34[Nestle]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://www.westmichiganmommy.com/2011_03_06_archive.html
  • 56. References Cont’Slide 38[Betty Crocker]. Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://www.lippincott.com/work/betty-crockerslide 40Kevin McClure. (2011). Signing Contract. [Photo], Retrieved Month Day, Year, from: http://www.azpowerhouse.com/2011/03/slide 41[Chocolate chip recipe]. (2011). Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: https://writerwoman61.wordpress.com/page/10/Slide 44Elena. (2010). Chocolate_squares. [Photo], Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://sweetsbyelena.com/mr-chocolate-nice-to- meet-you/Slide 47ShoaibHashmi. (2008). Court Decision. [Photo], Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://startupmeme.com/federal-court-awards- 3315-million-to-verizon-communications/Slide 49Chocolate Chips. (2009). [Photo], Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://cakespy.ireallylikefood.com/707323737/look-to-the- cookie-a-chocolate-chip-cookie-timeline/Slide 51A Pile of Cookies. [Photo], Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-photos-pile-cookies- image5066438Slide 52Kristiano. (2010). The Cookie Monster. [Photo], Retrieved October 7th, 2012, from: http://www.flickr.com/photos/callmekristiano/4710452735/lightbox/