• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
FRroughguide
 

FRroughguide

on

  • 1,524 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,524
Views on SlideShare
682
Embed Views
842

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
19
Comments
0

3 Embeds 842

http://www.floodresiliencegroup.org 840
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 1
https://www.linkedin.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    FRroughguide FRroughguide Presentation Transcript

    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE and URBAN PLANNING a Rough Guide September 2007 William Veerbeek DINarch Rotterdam Dura Vermeer Business Development ����
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RISK: risk concept is currupted through uncertainty and knowledge gaps PROBABILITY: Increasing uncertainty eliminates a probability dis- tribution IMPACT: We only know to a limited extend what impact means, yet we use it all too often in our assessments (risk-maps) Ri, j = pij i ! I, j ! J ,where i RESILIENCE*: Concept to help us cope with uncertainties... *Buzzword alarm ���� ���� �������������� Page 2
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE: concept found throughout in Nature RESILIENT PROPERTIES: adaptation, redundancy, robustness, self- organization, complexity, robustness, emergent behavior, ‘gracefull degredation’, etc. RESILIENT PROPERTIES ARE OFTEN FOUND IN DECENTRALIZED SYSTEMS RESILIENCE ENGINEERING: DESIGNING RESILIENT SYSTEMS! ���� ���� �������������� Page 3
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE: 2 important concepts: ROBUSTNESS: ability to withstand impact ADAPTIVE CAPACITY: ability to adjust to new conditions MODERN CITY INHERITS MANY CONCEPTS BELONGING TO RESILIENCE: CITY = COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEM WITH VARIOUS DEGREES OF: -high degree of redundancy > robustness -self-organizing behavior (social, economic, technical) > adaptation -various degrees of bottom-up behavior -complex system -city’s sustainability a function of emergent behavior WE CAN VIEW THE CITY AS A ‘SOCIAL NETWORK’ CONSISTING OF NUMEROUS INTERACTING PARTS ���� ���� �������������� Page 4
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE: Redundancy vs optimization GRACEFULL DEGREDATION: ability loose performance gradually Think how this is possible? ANSWER: decentralization POLDERS AND DYKE-SYSTEMS ARE DESIGNED FROM OPTIMIZATION STRATEGY: FAILURE> IMMEDIATE AND COMPLETE DISASTER DISASTER FOR AN INHABITANT, A CITY, A COUNTRY?: RESILIENCE IS OFTEN A MATTER OF PERSPECTIVE! ���� ���� �������������� Page 5
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE ENGINEERING: A Design Choice DESIGN STRATEGY OFTEN A RESULT OF EXISTING ‘CULTURE’ STRONG BELIEF IN TECHONOLOGY + RECOURSES > High degree of optimization, low degree of resilience WEAK BELIEF IN TECHONOLOGY AND/OR NO RECOURSES> Low de- gree of optimization, high degree of risilience HOUSING IN BANGLADESH: low life-cycle time, high resource availability (wood, reed, etc.) ���� ���� �������������� Page 6
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ INCREASING UNCERTAINTY > DIFFERENT PLANNING APPROACH EVOLUTION OF TOP-DOWN LINEAR > KNOWLEDGE INTENSIVE FEEDBACK i) Traditional ‘Waterfall’ model ������������� LINEAR PLANNING ������������� -Stable condtions ���������� -Requirements well understood ����������� -Experts add requirements -Low amount of stakeholders ii) Layer approach (current practise) ����������������� ����������� LAYER APPROACH ������������� -Coherent relations between layers ���������� ������������� -Requirements well understood -Envelopes provide flexibility -Higher degree of stakeholder involvement iii) Rapid prototyping (future practise?) ��������� ����������������� ITERATIVE APPROACH -Changing conditions ����������� -Integration of many factors -High degree of complexity -Needs stakeholder involvement ������������� ���� ���� �������������� Page 7
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ TOP-DOWN PLANNING > SPATIAL COHERENCE? SPATIAL COHERENCE DOESN’T NECESSARILY IMPLY RESILIENCE Concentration often leads to increase vulnerability ���� ���� �������������� Page 8
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ INCREASING URBAN RESILIENCE IS URGENT! RAPIDLY CHANGING CONDITIONS: 1800: 3% world population lived in cities 2000: 47% world population lived in cities Halle (Ger): shrinking 25% after fall Berlin Wall Las Vegas (US): 83.3% growth in 1990-2000 TRADITIONAL APPROACH IS INFLEXIBLE (NO ‘UNDO’ IN URBAN FABRIC) -RESILIENCE needs to be ‘built-in’ into a system ���� ���� �������������� Page 9
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE EXTENDS TO MANY DISCIPLINES (E.G. REGIONAL ECONOMY) CONNECTIVITY OF CITIES WILL DETERMINE ECONOMIC RESILIENCE Map network > identify dependencies between economic agents Measure economic flow between companies A: total connections B: basic material connections C: manufacturing connections D: trade connections E: producer-services connections Dataset: 9243 connections 2/3 of global GDP flow model for economic agents providing quantitative anlysis of network topology and interactions between agents Wall, R., and v.d. Knaap, B.,(2007), Archinomics, Towards a Sustainable World-City System, Holcim Conference, Tongji University, Shanghai, China INDICATORS: Diversification, Multipliers, Location Quotients, etc. ���� ���� �������������� Page 10
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ RESILIENCE: still badly understood: LITTLE KNOW ABOUT QUANTITATIVE WAYS TO MEASURE RESILIENCE > DIFFICULT TO ENGINEER RESILIENCE (COST-BENEFIT) RESILIENT TO WHAT? What is the threat? RESILIENT IN WHICH DOMAIN? Economic resilience, Ecologic resilience, etc. RESILIENT TO WHAT EXTEND? Recovery period, effects of changes RESILIENT TO WHAT SCALE-LEVEL? Individual vs System NEED FOR RESILIENCE INDICATORS > IMPACT MODEL Impact model = Primary Economic Damage model! ���� ���� �������������� Page 11
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE AND SPATIAL PLANNING: A COMPLEX RELATION RESILIENCE DEFINED BY SPILL-OVER EFFECTS BETWEEN SCALES especially important when reacting to residual hazard (extreme events) System Scales drivers responses: catchment (affected by climate (robustness, adaptation) change) residual effect residual hazard responses: urban (robustness, adaptation) residual effect residual hazard responses: building (robustness, adaptation) Zevenbergen, C., Gersonius, B., Veerbeek, W..,(2007), Urban Flood Management: A system’s approach, forthcoming ���� ���� �������������� Page 12
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: RESIDUAL EFFECTS BETWEEN SCALES VERY LITTLE KNOWLEDGE ON INTERACTION BETWEEN MEASURES Housing-level ���������� ������������������������ Hamburg, Germany Dura Vermeer, (2004), Gouden Kust, Maasbommel, Netherlands. DuraVermeer, (2005), Drijvende Kas, Naaldwijk, Netherlands spill-over effects Urban-level ���������� ������������������������ Dura Vermeer, (2004), Impression Flood Resilient Neighborhood spill-over effects Catchment-level ���� ���� Bypassproject, Zudphen, Netherlands �������������� Page 13
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: INTERPLAY BETWEEN DOMAINS NUMEROUS SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS DETERMINE FLOOD RESILIENCE Vulnerability: Extensive analysis of urban fabric A: materials B: functions C: ground space indices D: life-cycle E: sector distribution F: Value MODEL INTEGRATION G: Electric stations H: Typologies I: Primary Damage etc. Veerbeek, W., et al., (2007), Analysis of the river area for Dordrecht Drivers: Flood scenario’s including extreme events ���� ���� �������������� Veerbeek, W. et al., (2007), Analysis of the river area for Dordrecht Page 14
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: COMBINING ECONOMIC MODELS WITH GIS INFRASTRUCTURE AND UTILITY LIFELINES Regional Input-Output models > GIS-based infra network Nelen & Schuurmans, simulation of a breach in the Haarlemmermeerpolder Veerbeek, W., (2006), Economic Flow: a topological approach for the Haarlemmermeerpolder SECONDARAY DAMAGE ASSESSMENT Regional impact sectorial economic impact caused by flow interruption Dependancy analysis economic relation affected region > adjacent regions Substitution behavior post-disaster economic reconfiguration (= adaptation) ���� ���� �������������� Page 15
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: INTEGRATING GROWTH SCENARIOS URBAN GROWTH PREDICTIONS ARE INCREASING IN PRECISION Statistical growth models > GIS-based land-use models ECONOMY > SPATIAL CLAIMS Footprint investigation per sector 1000 ����������� 800 1 1% 28 % 12% 25 % 8% 600 2 0% 99 % 4 5% 37 % 4 4% 36 % 4 2% 400 3 9% 0% 1 2% 9% 1 2% 9% 1 0% 8% 0% 200 3 1% 0% 3 4% 29 % 3 6% 28 % 3 4% 0 �� � �� � � �� �� ��� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� �� ��� ��� ��� ��� �� �� �� �� �� � �� � ��� � �� �� �� ��� �� �� ��� �� ��� �� ������� �� ��������� ���������� ���������� Simulated growth Pattern fo Washington DC (2000), generated by SLEUTH-model V.d. Vegt, C, Korteweg, J. A., Lieshout, R., (2006), Amsterdamse Economische Verkenningen INTEGRATING SCENARIOS DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGES Sprawl large ecological footprints, recourse intensive (infrastructure) Aging population > Different requirements Spatial claims transformation production > services Policies outcomes of different policies can be studied Macro and Micro behavior/goals behavior based models Climate Scenarios factor analysis: factor contribution > resilience Eurostat, (2006), age distribution in 2001 and 2025 ���� ���� �������������� Page 16
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: OVERLAPPING POLICIES AND JURISDICTIONS DEVELOPMENT CAN BE A STRUGLE! Identification of 47 overlapping plans Arnhem Region (NL) Potential Development Speed (combined factors) Casabella, N., Franzen, A., Pieterse, S.F., Veerbeek, W., 2001, H2EURO: Analysis of existing Plans Rhine-Ruhr region City of Berkely, E-911 Dispatch and R-911 Notification Challenge Scenario: incident-jurisdiction map ���� ���� �������������� Page 17
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: FROM STATIC PLANS TO TOOLS STATIC DEVELOPMENT HARDLY FEASIBLE Changing conditions > flexible plans Gridlock because of complexity/stakeholder involvement Problem: creating a consistent spatial policy Impression Patchwork area Toolset typologies BVR, KAAP3, DINarch, Robbert de Koning, (2003) Ontwikkelingsplanologie: de praktijk in beeld ���� ���� �������������� Page 18
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE: AGENDA i) IMPLEMENTING GROWTH / SHRINKAGE STRATEGIES -Increasing vulnerability of people/economic backbone -Ensuring variety, integration of scales, sustainable backbones ii) REDEVELOPMENT ISSUES -Brownfield redevelopment -Post-war urban area’s -Minimize effects of bottlenecks > river floods, lodging (flash floods) iii) DEVELOPMENT OF TOOLS -Connecting (regional) economic models with flood models -Behavioral (multi-agent) models -Combining economic scenario’s with climate scenario’s iv) SUSTAINABILITY -Requirements urban resilience not necesserily create sustainability -Integration of resilient strategies with sustainability ���� ���� �������������� Page 19
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ FLOOD RESILIENCE AND SPATIAL PLANNING: A NETWORK APPROACH TAKE HOME MESSAGE: >DECENTRALIZE YOUR RECOURSES >DESIGN YOUR RECOURSES TO BE ADAPTABLE >ORGANIZE BOTTOM-UP >THINK LONG TERM >INVEST IN SCENARIO-RESEARCH MANY OF THE CONCEPTS DO NOT ONLY PROTECT YOUR CITY AGAINST FLOODS > THEY ENHANCE THE OVERALL RESILIENCE TOWARDS ANY CHANGES! -Yet, resilience engineering is still in its infancy ���� ���� �������������� Page 20
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ PRACTICAL APPLICATION: UFM-DORDRECHT GOAL: INFLUENCE DAMAGE CURVE First: generate the damage curve. No available model >Develop model 1. 1:4000 flood: Damage Distribution ���� ���� �������������� Page 21
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ PRACTICAL APPLICATION: UFM-DORDRECHT GOAL: INFLUENCE DAMAGE CURVE First: generate the damage curve. No available model >Develop model ‘Extreme event’: Damage Distribution ���� ���� �������������� Page 22
    • �������������������������� ������������������������������ ������������������������������ ������������������������������ PRACTICAL APPLICATION: UFM-DORDRECHT GOAL: INFLUENCE DAMAGE CURVE First: generate the damage curve. No available model >Develop model Then: replace individual damage curves>Implement dry/wet-proofing schemes ������ ���������� ���� ���� ���� �������������� Page 23