Florida Housing Coalition  22 nd  Annual Conference
What is HPRP <ul><li>Created under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>$1.5 ...
Overview <ul><li>Allocated based on the formula used for the HUD Emergency Shelter Grant Program </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum...
Overview <ul><li>Purpose is to rapidly transition program participants to stability, either through their own means or thr...
Overview (con’t) <ul><li>Funds intended to target two populations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individuals or families at risk o...
ASSESSING HOUSEHOLD ELIGIBILITY <ul><li>In order for a household to receive financial assistance, case management or any o...
ASSESSING HOUSEHOLD ELIGIBILITY <ul><li>HPRP funds are NOT intended for households facing foreclosure.  </li></ul>
Eligible Activities <ul><li>Financial assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Housing relocation and stabilization services </li></ul...
Eligible Activities –  Financial Assistance <ul><li>Financial assistance includes: </li></ul><ul><li>Short and medium term...
Eligible Activities –  Financial Assistance <ul><li>Rental assistance is defined as tenant-based assistance – that is, the...
Eligible Activities –  Financial Assistance <ul><li>Grantees are allowed to determine the amount of rental assistance prov...
Eligible Activities –  Financial Assistance <ul><li>Another allowable use under rental assistance is payment of “up to 6 m...
Eligible Activities –  Financial Assistance <ul><li>Rents paid cannot exceed HUD’s “rent reasonableness” standards.  </li>...
Eligible Activities –  Financial Assistance <ul><li>Rental payments cannot be made on behalf of eligible households who ar...
Eligible Activities – Housing  Relocation and Stabilization Services <ul><li>Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services...
Eligible Activities – Housing  Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Case management is essential ...
Eligible Activities – Housing  Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>A meeting with a case manager...
Eligible Activities – Housing  Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Within HPRP, case management ...
Eligible Activities – Housing  Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>HPRP case management includes...
PREVENTION <ul><li>Some HPRP programs focus on PREVENTION.  </li></ul><ul><li>In those programs, the case management tasks...
PREVENTION <ul><li>The case manager may help to identify the households with the greatest risk of homelessness.  </li></ul...
PREVENTION <ul><li>The emphasis in prevention (in HPRP) is on identifying the most pressing needs and using HPRP or other ...
RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>Rapid re-housing is intended for households who have already become homeless.  For HPRP, this mea...
RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>To qualify for rapid re-housing assistance, households must meet income guidelines and one or mor...
RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>Case management in the rapid re-housing portion of the HPRP program is focused on determining the...
RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>Long term housing stability includes a close look at income supports and employment.  </li></ul><...
CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Case management often includes outreach and engagement.  </li></ul><ul><li>On the prevention side,...
CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement in prevention involves identifying households who,  but for HPRP intervent...
CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement in prevention involves identifying households who,  but for HPRP intervent...
CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement involves different techniques for households qualifying for rapid re-housi...
CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement with households who are already homeless involves a different approach.  F...
CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement with households who are already homeless, whether they are newly homeless ...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Once eligibility has been established, the case manager moves to an ...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Assessment is possible only when the family or individual is an acti...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Assessment involves gathering information, prioritizing needs, and i...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Assessment involves gathering information, prioritizing needs, and i...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Determining whether a household can be assisted by the HPRP program,...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Household situations in which HPRP assistance might be particularly ...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>HPRP programs may choose to consider a number of personal characteri...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>The assessment process should also consider strategies for addressin...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Such factors should guide preliminary recommendations about short or...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>All of this should be done from a strengths-based perspective, takin...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>While HPRP provides only short-term and medium-term assistance, it i...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>In that scenario, the case manager should seek to refer the househol...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>A related consideration is the ability of mainstream systems to acce...
ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP  <ul><li>Case managers and system planners need to know about the status of w...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>Developing a plan for housing relocation and/or stabilization is at the ...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>Plans must be developed with full involvement from household members, an...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>For example, a previous job or jobs that the individual enjoyed, felt ch...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>These strengths should be explored even if there are problematic interve...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>Short-term stabilization is focused on immedi...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>For  prevention , the short-term plan address...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>The case manager works with the family to cre...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>For  rapid re-housing,  the immediate action ...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>Beyond housing search assistance and financia...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>Whether or not the client’s needs are primari...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>For individuals or households with more complicate...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>In these circumstances, the case manager has subst...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>For example, it can take weeks or months to resolv...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>For households who need ongoing assistance regardi...
HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>Case management in this medium-term period can als...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>While HPRP offers time-limited assistance, its overarching goal is to e...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>For many people, a job loss, medical crisis or family situation poses a...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>For example, the case manager might confirm that rent and utilities are...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>In other cases, particularly situations necessitating medium-term assis...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>On the other hand, in the cases of clients whose plans require receipt ...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION <ul><li>In each community, local system planners must consider issues and ma...
HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION <ul><li>Discussion? </li></ul><ul><li>Questions and Answers </li></ul>
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Homeless Prevention Denton

693 views
653 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Health & Medicine
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
693
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Homeless Prevention Denton

  1. 1. Florida Housing Coalition 22 nd Annual Conference
  2. 2. What is HPRP <ul><li>Created under Title XII of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 </li></ul><ul><li>$1.5 million allocated by Congress for communities to provide financial assistance and services to either prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless or help those who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly re-housed and stabilized. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Overview <ul><li>Allocated based on the formula used for the HUD Emergency Shelter Grant Program </li></ul><ul><li>Minimum award level of $500,000 </li></ul><ul><li>Required HUD approval of the grantee’s plan to use the grant </li></ul><ul><li>All funding must be under contract obligation to administer HPRP by 9-30-09 </li></ul><ul><li>Use of HPRP funds will be subject to the reporting requirements established under the Recovery Act, as specified by HUD and OMB </li></ul>
  4. 4. Overview <ul><li>Purpose is to rapidly transition program participants to stability, either through their own means or through public assistance, as appropriate. </li></ul><ul><li>Assistance is focused on housing stabilization, linking program participants to community resources and mainstream benefits, and developing a plan for preventing future housing instability. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Overview (con’t) <ul><li>Funds intended to target two populations: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Individuals or families at risk of becoming homeless who need temporary rent or utility assistance to prevent them from becoming homeless or assistance to move to another unit (prevention) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Individual or families who are homeless and need temporary assistance in order to obtain housing or retain it (rapid re-housing) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provides temporary financial assistance & housing relocation and stabilization services </li></ul>
  6. 6. ASSESSING HOUSEHOLD ELIGIBILITY <ul><li>In order for a household to receive financial assistance, case management or any other services through HPRP, the household must: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Have an initial consultation with a case manager (or other authorized representative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be at or below 50% of Area Median Income </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be homeless or at risk of homelessness, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Have no appropriate subsequent housing options </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Lack financial resources/support networks needed to resolve the housing crisis </li></ul></ul></ul>
  7. 7. ASSESSING HOUSEHOLD ELIGIBILITY <ul><li>HPRP funds are NOT intended for households facing foreclosure. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Eligible Activities <ul><li>Financial assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Housing relocation and stabilization services </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection and evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative costs </li></ul>
  9. 9. Eligible Activities – Financial Assistance <ul><li>Financial assistance includes: </li></ul><ul><li>Short and medium term rental assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Security deposits </li></ul><ul><li>Utility deposits </li></ul><ul><li>Utility payments </li></ul><ul><li>Moving cost assistance </li></ul><ul><li>Hotel and motel vouchers for up to 30 days </li></ul>
  10. 10. Eligible Activities – Financial Assistance <ul><li>Rental assistance is defined as tenant-based assistance – that is, the money is linked to eligible tenants, not to specific properties. </li></ul><ul><li>Short term assistance is capped at rental costs accrued over three months. </li></ul><ul><li>Medium term assistance is capped at rental costs accrued from 4 to 15 months. </li></ul><ul><li>Total period of allowable assistance may not exceed 18 months. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Eligible Activities – Financial Assistance <ul><li>Grantees are allowed to determine the amount of rental assistance provided (they are not held to standard HUD HCV formulas, for example). They can choose to use a shallow subsidy strategy, or can choose to pay full rent for households, or can choose to pay variable amounts. </li></ul><ul><li>It is legal for grantees to require tenant payments and to set provider agency caps for the amount of time a household can be assisted or the number of times they can be helped. </li></ul>
  12. 12. Eligible Activities – Financial Assistance <ul><li>Another allowable use under rental assistance is payment of “up to 6 months of rental arrears”. </li></ul><ul><li>These months of rental arrears count towards the total permitted number of months of assistance (six months of rental arrears paid would mean that rental assistance is only available to that household for 12 months). </li></ul>
  13. 13. Eligible Activities – Financial Assistance <ul><li>Rents paid cannot exceed HUD’s “rent reasonableness” standards. </li></ul><ul><li>HUD offers a worksheet to help grantees determine rent reasonableness at </li></ul><ul><li>www.hud.gov/offices/cpd/affordablehousing/library/forms/rentreasonablenesschecklist.doc </li></ul>
  14. 14. Eligible Activities – Financial Assistance <ul><li>Rental payments cannot be made on behalf of eligible households who are being assisted with housing costs through another state or federal program. For example, rent arrears cannot be paid on behalf of a person who is behind on their rent in a HUD-funded transitional housing program. </li></ul><ul><li>Utility payments CAN be made, though, for persons assisted in similar programs. In the above example, utility payments could be made. </li></ul>
  15. 15. Eligible Activities – Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services <ul><li>Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services include: </li></ul><ul><li>Case management </li></ul><ul><li>Outreach and engagement </li></ul><ul><li>Housing search and placement </li></ul><ul><li>Legal services </li></ul><ul><li>Credit repair </li></ul><ul><li>Like rental assistance, these services can only be provided for up to 18 months. </li></ul>
  16. 16. Eligible Activities – Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Case management is essential to the success of HPRP programs. </li></ul><ul><li>Within HPRP, case managers are expected to provide skilled assessments, access to short or middle term benefits, and links to ongoing services, if needed. </li></ul>
  17. 17. Eligible Activities – Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>A meeting with a case manager is required in order to receive HPRP assistance, although it is not necessarily the first step. </li></ul><ul><li>In most communities, the case manager will be part of the eligibility and assessment process. </li></ul>
  18. 18. Eligible Activities – Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Within HPRP, case management focuses on housing stability and placement, with an emphasis on the arrangement, coordination, monitoring and delivery of services related to housing needs and improving housing stability. </li></ul><ul><li>The focus is on HOUSING!! </li></ul>
  19. 19. Eligible Activities – Housing Relocation and Stabilization Services CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>HPRP case management includes: </li></ul><ul><li>Identification of households </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Planning </li></ul><ul><li>Resource Acquisition </li></ul><ul><li>Housing stabilization </li></ul><ul><li>Support </li></ul>
  20. 20. PREVENTION <ul><li>Some HPRP programs focus on PREVENTION. </li></ul><ul><li>In those programs, the case management tasks might include identification, outreach and engagement for at-risk households. </li></ul>
  21. 21. PREVENTION <ul><li>The case manager may help to identify the households with the greatest risk of homelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>Skilled assessment is needed to determine what support might prevent homelessness. </li></ul><ul><li>Not ALL households need rental subsidies. </li></ul>
  22. 22. PREVENTION <ul><li>The emphasis in prevention (in HPRP) is on identifying the most pressing needs and using HPRP or other sources to meet those needs, with the goal of housing stabilization. </li></ul><ul><li>This probably includes a look at income supports and employment. </li></ul>
  23. 23. RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>Rapid re-housing is intended for households who have already become homeless. For HPRP, this means individuals and families whose income is at or below 50% of Area Median income and who meet the homelessness criteria (next slide). </li></ul>
  24. 24. RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>To qualify for rapid re-housing assistance, households must meet income guidelines and one or more of the following criteria: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sleeping in an emergency shelter </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sleeping in a place not meant for human habitation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In hospital or institution for up to 180 days but homeless immediately prior to entry </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Graduating or “timing out” of a transitional housing program </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Escaping domestic violence </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>Case management in the rapid re-housing portion of the HPRP program is focused on determining the need for specific levels of housing assistance and helping the household identify and obtain housing that is affordable. </li></ul><ul><li>The first step is to stabilize the crisis. The next step is to work with the household to identify resources that will improve the households longer term housing stability. </li></ul>
  26. 26. RAPID RE-HOUSING <ul><li>Long term housing stability includes a close look at income supports and employment. </li></ul><ul><li>It may include links to ongoing supports and services (such as mental health, primary health care, child care services, etc). This is accomplished through referral. </li></ul><ul><li>While a skilled assessment of long term needs is essential, it should be remembered that long term supports are inappropriate within HPRP. </li></ul>
  27. 27. CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Case management often includes outreach and engagement. </li></ul><ul><li>On the prevention side, it is helpful to think about homelessness prevention as part of an overall shelter diversion strategy. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify – where do households go for help just before they come to the shelter in crisis? </li></ul>
  28. 28. CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement in prevention involves identifying households who, but for HPRP intervention , would become homeless. </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying these households may mean asking community agencies to look for and identify households on their caseloads who are at imminent risk. It requires coordination with mainstream services. </li></ul>
  29. 29. CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement in prevention involves identifying households who, but for HPRP intervention , would become homeless. </li></ul><ul><li>Identifying these households may mean asking community agencies to look for and identify households on their caseloads who are at imminent risk. It requires coordination with mainstream services. </li></ul>
  30. 30. CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement involves different techniques for households qualifying for rapid re-housing. </li></ul><ul><li>When households request services from either Continuum or mainstream service agencies, and they are actually homeless, the HPRP process can “kick in”. </li></ul>
  31. 31. CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement with households who are already homeless involves a different approach. For people who have been homeless for any length of time, successful outreach techniques include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-threatening approach </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Persistent contact over time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Offer of flexible array of services </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Commitment to household choice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Respect and dignity </li></ul></ul>
  32. 32. CASE MANAGEMENT <ul><li>Outreach and engagement with households who are already homeless, whether they are newly homeless or they have been homeless for a period of time, must include a coherent and real offer of services that meet immediate, essential needs related to housing and personal safety. </li></ul>
  33. 33. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Once eligibility has been established, the case manager moves to an assessment of a household’s need for housing placement, financial assistance, and services and supports. The process of assessment serves two purposes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>establishing a trusting relationship with the persons seeking help and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>determining the basic degree of fit between household needs and HPRP and/or mainstream services. </li></ul></ul>
  34. 34. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Assessment is possible only when the family or individual is an active participant, making decisions about the array of services needed and wanted. By establishing a working relationship with the client or clients, the case manager can understand the context of individual needs and suggest the types and level of services that will be most effective. </li></ul>
  35. 35. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Assessment involves gathering information, prioritizing needs, and identifying barriers. [1] The HUD Homelessness Resource Exchange ( www.hudhre.info ) offers a number of helpful examples and tools in the “Client Intake, Assessment, and Case Management” section. [2] </li></ul><ul><li>[1] Adams, N. and Grieder, D.M. (2005). Treatment Planning for Person-Centered Care: The Road to Mental Health and Addiction Recovery. Elsevier Academic Press, Burlington, MA. </li></ul><ul><li>[2] http://www.hudhre.info/index.cfm?do=viewAllResourcesByTopic&topicid=81&pTopicID=81 </li></ul>
  36. 36. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Assessment involves gathering information, prioritizing needs, and identifying barriers. [1] The HUD Homelessness Resource Exchange ( www.hudhre.info ) offers a number of helpful examples and tools in the “Client Intake, Assessment, and Case Management” section. [2] </li></ul><ul><li>[1] Adams, N. and Grieder, D.M. (2005). Treatment Planning for Person-Centered Care: The Road to Mental Health and Addiction Recovery. Elsevier Academic Press, Burlington, MA. </li></ul><ul><li>[2] http://www.hudhre.info/index.cfm?do=viewAllResourcesByTopic&topicid=81&pTopicID=81 </li></ul>
  37. 37. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Determining whether a household can be assisted by the HPRP program, and if so, how, depends on a number of factors. [1] The case manager should consider the household’s immediate housing situation, vulnerability factors, and financial or practical barriers to housing. </li></ul><ul><li>[1] Department of Housing and Urban Development, Notice of Allocations, Application Procedures, and Requirements for Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program Grantees under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, pp. 24 – 27. http://www.hudhre.info/documents/HPRP_Notice_3-19-09.pdf </li></ul>
  38. 38. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Household situations in which HPRP assistance might be particularly appropriate include: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Facing eviction within 2 weeks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Facing discharge within 2 weeks from institutional stay of 180 days or more </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Residency in condemned housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sudden and significant loss of income </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sudden and significant increase in utility costs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pending foreclosure of rental housing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exceeding health and/or safety standards for housing unit size </li></ul></ul>
  39. 39. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>HPRP programs may choose to consider a number of personal characteristics that threaten housing stability in establishing priorities for HPRP assistance, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Mental health and substance abuse issues </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Physical disabilities and other chronic health issues, including HIV/AIDS </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Severe housing cost burden (greater than 50 percent of income) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Homelessness in last 12 months </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Young head of household (under 25 with children or pregnant) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Past institutional care (prison, treatment facility, hospital) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recent traumatic life event or health crisis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current or past involvement with child welfare, including foster care </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Current or past domestic violence </li></ul></ul>
  40. 40. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>The assessment process should also consider strategies for addressing financial or practical barriers to obtaining or maintaining housing, such as: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Extremely low income (less than 30 percent of Area Median Income) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Credit problems </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Significant amount of medical debt </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative tenant history </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Criminal history </li></ul></ul>
  41. 41. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Such factors should guide preliminary recommendations about short or medium-term assistance, level and type of financial assistance, tenant share of subsidy, specific financial needs, etc. Case managers need to evaluate the household as a whole, including prospects for employment, needs for training, or requirements for other income assistance to support long-term housing stability. </li></ul>
  42. 42. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>All of this should be done from a strengths-based perspective, taking into account job skills, willingness to participate in job training or education, social support systems, hopes and aspirations, etc. </li></ul>
  43. 43. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>While HPRP provides only short-term and medium-term assistance, it is possible that the individual or household need for assistance is too complex and will require an ongoing commitment of services and supports. </li></ul>
  44. 44. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>In that scenario, the case manager should seek to refer the household to more long-term and/or intensive CoC programs (e.g., permanent supportive housing) and/or mainstream service delivery systems (e.g., a Public Housing Agency, mental health treatment, etc.) that can provide ongoing, intensive assistance. </li></ul>
  45. 45. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>A related consideration is the ability of mainstream systems to accept and provide adequate supports for those who are referred for more intensive services. The length and amount of HPRP assistance may then depend on mainstream systems’ capacity and depth to absorb new referrals. </li></ul>
  46. 46. ASSESSING HOUSING AND SERVICE NEEDS FOR HPRP <ul><li>Case managers and system planners need to know about the status of waiting lists, eligibility requirements, documentation requirements, and specific services availability. In many cases, this linkage will require a strong advocacy role by the case manager to enable expedited access for households with complex needs. </li></ul>
  47. 47. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>Developing a plan for housing relocation and/or stabilization is at the heart of defining assistance that should be offered to homeless and/or at-risk households. Case managers should build plans around clients’ own goals, with obtaining or maintaining stable housing as a primary goal and other steps needed to achieve housing stability (such as employment or needed supports) as related goals. </li></ul>
  48. 48. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>Plans must be developed with full involvement from household members, and should start with a strengths assessment. Strategies for increasing housing stability should always seek to leverage these strengths </li></ul>
  49. 49. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>For example, a previous job or jobs that the individual enjoyed, felt challenged by, and/or is interested in for the future represents a strength that can be built upon to help support the long-term stabilization of the household. </li></ul>
  50. 50. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN <ul><li>These strengths should be explored even if there are problematic intervening factors, such as being fired or experiencing medical problems. An individual who has had a successful job history but has lost work due to a behavioral health issue, for example, might benefit from short-term housing assistance while participating in employment services. </li></ul>
  51. 51. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>Short-term stabilization is focused on immediate, housing-related needs. During a period of short-term support, the case manager maintains, as needed, close contact with both the tenant and landlord to resolve any issues that might arise. The case manager might also use the opportunity to discuss with the client how to pursue ongoing goals once housing stability is achieved and the assistance ends. </li></ul>
  52. 52. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>For prevention , the short-term plan addresses the causes of housing instability. For example, a family might be at risk of losing housing due to losing shifts on a job or being forced from full-time to part-time status. The consequence of these cutbacks might include unpaid utility bills and late payments to an unhappy landlord. </li></ul>
  53. 53. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>The case manager works with the family to create a short-term stabilization plan that both responds to the immediate need and sets goals and objectives to increase the household income right away. HPRP funds can be used to support pursuit of these goals, by paying for two months’ “back rent,” two months of utility arrears, and an additional 90 days of rental assistance, for example. </li></ul>
  54. 54. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>For rapid re-housing, the immediate action plan developed by the case manager might include short-term sheltering arrangements in a local motel, active assistance with housing relocation, provision of move-in assistance for new housing arrangements, and commitment of 3 months’ rent. </li></ul>
  55. 55. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>Beyond housing search assistance and financial assistance, case management during a period of short-term rapid re-housing assistance might well also include linkage to legal services, credit repair, and employment training and support. </li></ul>
  56. 56. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Short term Stabilization <ul><li>Whether or not the client’s needs are primarily financial, HPRP funds function as a critical resource for housing-focused case management. </li></ul>
  57. 57. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>For individuals or households with more complicated needs, or a need for assistance that exceeds 3 months, medium-term assistance (up to 18 months) may be justified. The immediate needs of the household might be similar to those receiving short-term assistance, but due to financial reasons or personal characteristics, establishing housing stability will take longer. </li></ul>
  58. 58. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>In these circumstances, the case manager has substantially more time to work with households on resolving more complex concerns, if needed and desired by the household. In many instances, the household’s issues might be with mainstream systems themselves. </li></ul>
  59. 59. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>For example, it can take weeks or months to resolve child protective services cases, clarify Medicaid eligibility determinations, or track down citizenship and birth records necessary for employment. </li></ul>
  60. 60. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>For households who need ongoing assistance regarding job training and job search, medium-term assistance through HPRP also offers a sustained period of stable housing while they develop capacity for self-sufficiency through employment. </li></ul>
  61. 61. HOUSING RELOCATION AND STABILIZATION PLAN – Medium term support <ul><li>Case management in this medium-term period can also support successful engagement in behavioral health services – allowing people time to engage with mental health or substance abuse services that further improve their chances at long-term housing stability. </li></ul>
  62. 62. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>While HPRP offers time-limited assistance, its overarching goal is to establish long-term housing stability. The HPRP case manager helps to give the client a running start toward housing stability, whether the household achieves this stability independently, or the HPRP case manager helps the household make a successful transition to another set of services. </li></ul>
  63. 63. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>For many people, a job loss, medical crisis or family situation poses an immediate but discrete threat to housing stability, and longer term follow-up might not be necessary. In such cases, it is nevertheless important to follow up with the landlord and tenant to ensure that the assistance provided has resolved the housing instability and that the household is progressing toward its goals. </li></ul>
  64. 64. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>For example, the case manager might confirm that rent and utilities are being paid promptly and that other household expenses such as food and furnishings are being met. </li></ul>
  65. 65. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>In other cases, particularly situations necessitating medium-term assistance, more comprehensive follow-up is warranted. </li></ul><ul><li>For example, if a client’s plan to achieve long-term housing stability is based upon successful completion of vocational training programs, it might be appropriate to follow up informally with the client and/or training providers. </li></ul>
  66. 66. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – MONITORING PROGRESS <ul><li>On the other hand, in the cases of clients whose plans require receipt of ongoing support, such as through permanent supportive housing and behavioral health services, more intensive follow up with these other systems might be necessary in order to monitor permanent housing applications and ensure the client has access to needed and desired services. </li></ul>
  67. 67. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION <ul><li>In each community, local system planners must consider issues and make decisions about how case management in the local homelessness service delivery system helps support the best use of this Federal funding opportunity. Effective, strengths-based case management is essential to the success of the HPRP model. </li></ul>
  68. 68. HPRP CASE MANAGEMENT – SUMMARY AND DISCUSSION <ul><li>Discussion? </li></ul><ul><li>Questions and Answers </li></ul>

×