Question 1b Media Language

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Question 1b Media Language

  1. 1. <ul><ul><li>G235: Critical Perspectives in Media </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Theoretical Evaluation of Production </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1(b) Media Language </li></ul></ul>
  2. 2. Aims/Objectives <ul><li>To reinforce the basic media language that create meaning in texts. </li></ul><ul><li>To have a basic understanding of how to evaluate your coursework against the media language that you used. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Importance of media language <ul><li>Every medium has its own ‘language’ – or combination of languages – that it uses to communicate meaning. Television, for example, uses verbal and written language as well as the languages of moving images and sound. </li></ul><ul><li>We call these ‘languages’ because they use familiar codes and conventions that are generally understood. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Denotation, Connotation and Myth <ul><li>In semiotics, denotation and connotation are terms describing the relationship between the signifier and its signified . </li></ul>
  5. 5. <ul><li>Barthes (1977) argued that in film connotation can be (analytically) distinguished from denotation. </li></ul><ul><li>As John Fiske (1982) puts it “denotation is what is filmed, connotation is how it is filmed”. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Making connections? <ul><li>Evaluating media language is an evaluation of all micro elements and how they have created meaning to inform us about genre, narrative, representations/ ideology, targeting of audiences. </li></ul><ul><li>This requires us to use semiotic terminology to explain our encoding of elements and codes and conventions within our texts. </li></ul><ul><li>We must also remember to discuss the preferred meaning (Hall, 1980) that we wanted our audience to DECODE. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Micro Elements: Mise-en-Scene <ul><li>Mise-en-scène constitutes the key aspect of the pre-production phase of the film and can be taken to include all aspects of production design and Cinematography . </li></ul><ul><li>Mise-en-Scene creates the diegetic world - the fictional space and time implied by the narrative, i.e. the world in which the story takes place. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Aspects of Mise-en-Scene – video and print style <ul><li>Location - settings, set-design and iconography </li></ul><ul><li>Character – Costume, Properties and Make Up, Actors and Gesture </li></ul><ul><li>Cinematography - Lighting and Colour </li></ul><ul><li>Layout and Page Design – colour, juxtaposition of elements. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Micro Elements: Camerawork <ul><li>There are Four aspects to camerawork that you need to understand: </li></ul><ul><li>Shot Types – particularly relevant for print. </li></ul><ul><li>Camera Composition </li></ul><ul><li>Camera Movement </li></ul><ul><li>Camera Angles </li></ul>
  10. 10. Continuity <ul><li>Establishing/Re-establishing Shot </li></ul><ul><li>Transitions . </li></ul><ul><li>The 180° Line Rule . </li></ul><ul><li>Action Match . </li></ul><ul><li>Crosscutting . </li></ul><ul><li>Cutaway . </li></ul><ul><li>Insert Shots . </li></ul><ul><li>Shot - Reverse Shot Structures . </li></ul><ul><li>Eyeline Match . </li></ul>
  11. 11. Non-Continuity <ul><li>Montage Sequence . </li></ul><ul><li>Flash Back/Forward . </li></ul><ul><li>Ellipsis . </li></ul><ul><li>Graphic Match . </li></ul>
  12. 12. <ul><li>“ Media is communication”. Discuss the ways that you have used media language to create meanings in one of your media products. </li></ul>Think of this question as the first part of your revision...

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