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Accessibility workshop presented by Dr Simon Ball, Senior Advisor, JISC TechDis Service, at the University of Plymouth in January 2008.

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  • Everyday Techniques to make your practices more Accessible Dr Simon Ball [email_address] 30 th January 2008
  • TechDis supports the education sector in achieving greater accessibility and inclusion by stimulating innovation and providing expert advice and guidance on disability and technology. TechDis is a JISC funded advisory service (Joint Information Systems Committee) based in York, that: Advises funding bodies and policy makers. Provides guidance to strategic partners and intermediaries. Provides advice for management, front line and specialist staff. Provides effective resources for practitioners.
  • Ambiguous instructions can be difficult to follow. Instructions and details should be tested to ensure they work as expected. Students with a disability may not be able to react in the expected manner. Students with a cognitive disability may react in an unexpected way – everyone’s instinct and interpretation will differ.
  • We believe it is best practice to take a holistic approach to accessibility. Do not be afraid to add value in different ways for different learners – everybody doesn’t have to access the same information in the same way, as long as the learning outcomes are met and the experience is broadly equivalent. Broadening the range of what is offered will increase accessibility overall, despite specific barriers that may arise.
  • TechDis Online services www.techdis.ac.uk Community site www.techdis.ac.uk/community Accessibility Essentials 1. Making your computer work better for you 2. Producing Word documents that are more inclusive 3. Producing inclusive PowerPoints and presentations 4. NEW! Making PDFs as accessible as possible www.techdis.ac.uk/accessibilityessentials Staff packs www.techdis.ac.uk/staffpacks Free Software www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware HEAT Scheme www.techdis.ac.uk/index.php?p=2_1_7
  • HEAT Scheme Allows academic, teaching and support staff to bid for technology to uncover or develop inclusive practice. Range includes podcasting, mind mapping, using hand held games, using a gyro-mouse and keyboard, and a Talking Tactile Tablet.
  • Hellawell and Priestley (University of Bradford) Dyslexic student used handheld video recorder to create mini documentaries providing an opportunity for reflective learning. These were edited and converted to a format suitable for playing on PCs, and audio podcasts produced, to be shared with future students.
  • Chin (University of Hull) Tyrrell (Coventry University) Wireless mouse and keyboard passed to students giving direct input into class discussions. The lecturer was free to move around the classroom and focus on individual students where necessary. Students were more likely to participate when attention was not drawn specifically to them.
  • Badge, Scott & Cann (Leicester Univ.) Transformed PowerPoint into Breeze (Adobe Presenter), Impatica & Flash. Trialled with students identifying as dyslexic, hearing or vision impaired, in addition to non-declaring control. Students with ‘disability’ were more active in using controls – used more features and more often – and located them more quickly.
  • Gresty (Plymouth Univ.) – 96% of students felt more learning took place when using audio recordings of lectures. Most students reported using ‘dead time’ (on buses etc) to listen to the audio. Hindley (Nottingham Trent Univ.) - created tailored guides to an assignment previously found difficult – students were supported at their own pace at a crucial part of the course. Leng (Bath Spa Univ.) - took weekly lecture topics and related in her podcasts to current news stories to bring subject matter ‘to life’.
  • Chevins (Keele Univ.) helped a blind and a VI student to understand Transmission Electron Microscopy. Using a cartoon of a cutaway of the microscope he created a tactile diagram using swell paper. He then used the T3 to add audio commentaries to each part of the diagram, so when touched, a contextual audio file was enabled. Cassella (Derby Univ.) found these were used by many students with visual or auditory learning style.
  • Romer (York Univ.) used mind mapping software to enable students to plan and write essays in a different way. Many found it a useful way of planning, especially those with dyslexia. Brown (Newcastle Univ.) used the software with a mature student who reported benefits to recall by being able to attach images to the map.
  • There are many easy small steps that we can all make that will make a big difference to the student experience. Here are a few easy things you can do:
  • The chosen font should be Sans Serif, for example Verdana, Arial and Helvetica. Text should be no smaller than 12 point. Underlining, capitalising or italicising large volumes of text should be avoided as the readability is significantly decreased, consider making the text bold instead.
  • It’s easier to demo this than write about it on a slide: Unstructured document Structured document
  • Images Insert Alternative Text where relevant (easy in Word – see Accessibility Essentials 2) Explore whether meaning is more difficult to grasp if whole image cannot be viewed at once.
  • An image showing an entire flow chart, to complement the next slide
  • An image showing a tiny fraction of the flow chart, as if the viewer had tunnel vision, highlighting the fact that technology may still enable the viewer to access an image (e.g. magnifiers) but if one cannot conceptualise the ‘whole’ there still may be not equality of access
  • Image in grayscale highlighting how difficult it can be to make sense of an image where colour is vital to its interpretation – the image looks like a series of grey marks – no detail is distinguishable
  • A heavily pixelated image from an album cover
  • Presentations and PowerPoint Face forward while speaking. Ensure content is vocalised – don’t use the classic ‘you can all read the slide so I won’t read it out’ If a mike or audio system is available, use it. If using animation or video, let it finish before speaking. Use the Notes field in PowerPoint! Much more in Accessibility Essentials 3!
  • Accessibility benefits of PDFs Reflow Reflows the text of a document written in columns so that it flows all the way across the page. Easier to read on screen – reduces the need to scroll up and down. BUT depends on the reading order being tagged properly when the document is created - needs to be checked. e-strategysummary
  • Accessibility benefits of PDFs Automatically scroll Automatically scrolls through document, speed controlled by up and down arrows. Read out loud Whole document or current page only. Voices can be changed (edit>preferences>reading). NB reading order needs to be checked. Accessibility preferences Allows reader to customise the document. Useful but limited to font and background colours.
  • Accessibility benefits of PDFs Pages view Shows each page as a series of thumbnails – useful when looking for a particular image, allows reader to find it quickly. Bookmarks Similar to Document Map in Word – allows faster navigation through the document, reader able to jump to specific sections etc. Structure of Word documents picked up when converted to PDF format. VLE document
  • So… the Technologies you can use [easily] to develop Inclusive Learning Please note – wherever you are on the spectrum from ‘technically savvy’ to ‘a bit nervous of trying new things’, you should find something that works for you (hopefully!)
  • Instant Presenter screenshot showing presenter’s webcam, slide or interactive whiteboard, list of participants and chat pane
  • Audacity Simple route into making podcasts Good introductory tutorial at http://blog.podblaze.com/public/blog/139564 Can add introductory music etc simply to make a professional sounding podcast. Have been used as ‘backup’ for lectures, for additional material for listening in ‘dead time’ e.g. on buses, and for adding supporting material e.g. describing current news items of relevance to the curriculum
  • Camstudio (with subtitles via MovieMaker) Choose images to be used. Open Camstudio, define ‘recordable’ area, move cursor, add commentary. Volunteer required to demonstrate! Save avi file. Open file in Windows MovieMaker Add subtitles. Et voila!
  • WINK Produces more flexible presentations, with image selection, flexible audio and captioning, subtitling and so on. Demo on www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware under Visualisation Tools Demo file hyperlink
  • DSpeech Allows electronic text to be converted into ‘automatic’ podcasts using a computerised voice. Computerised voices aren’t for everyone! But they do add a degree of flexibility for those who do not like or have difficulty with reading, or who want to listen whilst doing other things. Another Demo is available at http://www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware DSpeech Demo hyperlink
  • A number of different brands of mind mapping software to choose from. Most will directly transpose a mind map into a text document (and vice versa, providing the document is structured correctly – more on this later on!)
  • LetMeType Word prediction and spell checking facility. You can import glossaries of technical terms, and it will learn words as you type. More at http://www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware LetMeType Demo !
  • A demonstration of Dasher, software developed to enable a newly paraplegic staff member to return to work – superb demonstration of the power of assistive technologies
  • Wikis Blogs GoogleDocs Gabbly Interwise
  • Audio/Podcasting Add human voice to Word (Earlylife.doc) Text to speech isn’t always an adequate option! (Conebearer.mp3) PowerPoint action settings with audio clips on different images (Iceland student example ) PowerPoint action settings with audio clips on the same image Camtasia, Audacity, DSpeech / Natural Reader / SayPad for Text-To-Speech
  • Latest Developments – Guide to Alternative Formats Document on how to obtain alternative formats in the quickest and smoothest way is in final draft stage and should be published shortly – it will be sent straight to organisations like ALIS for distribution among members. It highlights the need for us to know exactly what we asking for and why, because the Publishers rarely understand the detail behind the request. Document draft
  • Latest Developments – Publishers LookUp We are in the process of developing a subsite to our website called www.publisherlookup.org.uk – each Publisher will list on there exactly what formats they offer for which titles, the price, expected lead times for productions and so on – a one-stop shop for information on alternative formats Site due to go live mid-Feb - will be similar to US version – www.publisherlookup.org – but with much more detailed advice
  • RoboBraille – www.robobraille.org Simply email a Word document to one of their email addresses e.g. britspeech@robobraille.org You receive (normally about 5 minutes – it only takes two hours when you’re demonstrating it in a presentation!) a high quality synthetic speech MP3 to download. When the URL of your MP3 comes back be aware they always put a full stop at the end which stops it from working!
  • Xerte is a Learning Object Generator that is both accessible to use and produces accessible learning objects (if you use its features correctly!) You can download the latest version of the tool from http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/xerte/ Guidance available at: http://www.techdis.ac.uk/community/course/view.php?id=86 We’re linking this to the Accessibility Passport work.
  • Simulations: not the real thing, but they give some idea of what it’s like www.techdis.ac.uk/simdis www.webaim.org/simulations/... … screenreader.php … lowvision.php … cognitive.php
  • Useful links TechDis www.techdis.ac.uk Academy www.heacademy.ac.uk Subject Network www.ukcle.ac.uk Netskills www.netskills.ac.uk ALT/CMALT www.alt.ac.uk/cmalt AbilityNet www.abilitynet.org.uk SEDA www.seda.ac.uk
  • http://www.techdis.ac.uk/community/course/ view.php?id =79 Contact details JISC TechDis Service Higher Education Academy Building Innovation Way York Science Park York YO10 5BR [email_address] www.techdis.ac.uk
  • Plymouthworkshop300108printversion

    1. 1. TechDis workshop Everyday Techniques to make your practices more Accessible Dr Simon Ball [email_address] 30 th January 2008
    2. 2. The JISC TechDis Advisory Service <ul><li>TechDis supports the education sector in achieving greater accessibility and inclusion by stimulating innovation and providing expert advice and guidance on disability and technology. </li></ul><ul><li>TechDis is a funded advisory service (Joint Information Systems Committee) based in York, that: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Advises funding bodies and policy makers. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides guidance to strategic partners and intermediaries. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides advice for management, front line and specialist staff. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides effective resources for practitioners. </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. Conclusions <ul><li>Ambiguous instructions can be difficult to follow. </li></ul><ul><li>Instructions and details should be tested to ensure they work as expected. </li></ul><ul><li>Students with a disability may not be able to react in the expected manner. Students with a cognitive disability may react in an unexpected way – everyone’s instinct and interpretation will differ. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Holistic Approach <ul><li>We believe it is best practice to take a holistic approach to accessibility. </li></ul><ul><li>Do not be afraid to add value in different ways for different learners – everybody doesn’t have to access the same information in the same way, as long as the learning outcomes are met and the experience is broadly equivalent. </li></ul><ul><li>Broadening the range of what is offered will increase accessibility overall, despite specific barriers that may arise. </li></ul>
    5. 5. Staff Development & Support <ul><li>TechDis Online services www.techdis.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Community site www.techdis.ac.uk/community </li></ul><ul><li>Accessibility Essentials </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1. Making your computer work better for you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2. Producing Word documents that are more inclusive </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3. Producing inclusive PowerPoints and presentations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>4. NEW! Making PDFs as accessible as possible </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>www.techdis.ac.uk/ accessibilityessentials </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Staff packs www.techdis.ac.uk/ staffpacks </li></ul><ul><li>Free Software www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware </li></ul><ul><li>HEAT Scheme www.techdis.ac.uk/ index.php?p =2_1_7 </li></ul>
    6. 6. HEAT Scheme <ul><li>Allows academic, teaching and support staff to bid for technology to uncover or develop inclusive practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Range includes podcasting, mind mapping, using hand held games, using a gyro-mouse and keyboard, and a Talking Tactile Tablet. </li></ul>
    7. 7. HEAT example – Reflective Diaries <ul><li>Hellawell and Priestley </li></ul><ul><li>(University of Bradford) </li></ul><ul><li>Dyslexic student used </li></ul><ul><li>handheld video recorder to </li></ul><ul><li>create mini documentaries </li></ul><ul><li>providing an opportunity for reflective learning. </li></ul><ul><li>These were edited and converted to a format </li></ul><ul><li>suitable for playing on PCs, and audio podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>produced, to be shared with future students. </li></ul>
    8. 8. HEAT example – Gyromouse (anonymous input) <ul><li>Chin (University of Hull) </li></ul><ul><li>Tyrrell (Coventry University) </li></ul><ul><li>Wireless mouse and keyboard passed to </li></ul><ul><li>students giving direct input into class discussions. </li></ul><ul><li>The lecturer was free to move around the </li></ul><ul><li>classroom and focus on individual students </li></ul><ul><li>where necessary. </li></ul><ul><li>Students were more likely to participate when </li></ul><ul><li>attention was not drawn specifically to them. </li></ul>
    9. 9. HEAT Example - Multimedia accessibility <ul><li>Badge, Scott & Cann (Leicester Univ.) </li></ul><ul><li>Transformed PowerPoint into Breeze (Adobe Presenter), Impatica & Flash. </li></ul><ul><li>Trialled with students identifying as dyslexic, hearing or vision impaired, in addition to non-declaring control. </li></ul><ul><li>Students with ‘disability’ were more active in using controls – used more features and more often – and located them more quickly. </li></ul>
    10. 10. HEAT Example - Podcasting <ul><li>Gresty (Plymouth Univ.) – 96% of students felt more learning took place when using audio recordings of lectures. Most students reported using ‘dead time’ (on buses etc) to listen to the audio. </li></ul><ul><li>Hindley (Nottingham Trent Univ.) - created tailored guides to an assignment previously found difficult – students were supported at their own pace at a crucial part of the course. </li></ul><ul><li>Leng (Bath Spa Univ.) - took weekly lecture topics and related in her podcasts to current news stories to bring subject matter ‘to life’. </li></ul>
    11. 11. HEAT Example – Talking Tactile Tablet <ul><li>Chevins (Keele Univ.) helped a blind and a VI student to understand Transmission Electron Microscopy. Using a cartoon of a cutaway of the microscope he created a tactile diagram using swell paper. He then used the T3 to add audio commentaries to each part of the diagram, so when touched, a contextual </li></ul><ul><li>audio file was enabled. </li></ul><ul><li>Cassella (Derby Univ.) </li></ul><ul><li>found these were used by </li></ul><ul><li>many students with visual </li></ul><ul><li>or auditory learning style. </li></ul>
    12. 12. HEAT Example – Mind Mapping <ul><li>Romer (York Univ.) used mind mapping software to enable students to plan and write essays in a different way. Many found it a useful way of planning, especially those with dyslexia. </li></ul><ul><li>Brown (Newcastle Univ.) used the software with a mature student who reported benefits to recall by being able to attach images to the map. </li></ul>
    13. 13. First Steps <ul><li>There are many easy small steps that we can all make that will make a big difference to the student experience. </li></ul><ul><li>Here are a few easy things you can do: </li></ul>
    14. 14. Best Practice with Fonts and Colour <ul><li>Ideally when creating materials online allow users to select according to their own preferences. </li></ul><ul><li>The chosen font (for on-screen) should be Sans Serif and be no smaller than 12 point. </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid large amounts of underlining, capitalising or italicising. </li></ul><ul><li>Try to achieve good contrast without the glare issues of black on white. Increase font depth for light text on dark background. </li></ul>
    15. 15. Use of Styles and Formatting <ul><li>It’s easier to demo this than write about it on a slide: </li></ul><ul><li>Unstructured document </li></ul><ul><li>Structured document </li></ul>
    16. 16. Appropriate use of Images <ul><li>Insert Alternative Text where relevant (easy in Word – see Accessibility Essentials 2) </li></ul><ul><li>Explore whether meaning is more difficult to grasp if whole image cannot be viewed at once – see next slides. </li></ul>
    17. 17. Images 1: Perfect vision?
    18. 18. Images 2: Tunnel vision
    19. 19. If materials are to be printed, check image in grayscale.
    20. 20. Pixelation <ul><li>The image below is a section from which million-selling album cover from 2004 ? </li></ul>
    21. 21. Presentations and PowerPoint <ul><li>Face forward while speaking. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure content is vocalised – don’t use the classic ‘you can all read the slide so I won’t read it out’ </li></ul><ul><li>If a mike or audio system is available, use it. </li></ul><ul><li>If using animation or video, let it finish before speaking. </li></ul><ul><li>Use the Notes field in PowerPoint! </li></ul><ul><li>Much more in Accessibility Essentials 3! </li></ul>
    22. 22. Accessibility benefits of PDFs <ul><li>Reflow </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reflows the text of a document written in columns so that it flows all the way across the page. Easier to read on screen – reduces the need to scroll up and down. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>BUT depends on the reading order being tagged properly when the document is created - needs to be checked. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Sample PDF </li></ul></ul>
    23. 23. Accessibility benefits of PDFs <ul><li>Automatically scroll </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Automatically scrolls through document, speed controlled by up and down arrows. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Read out loud </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Whole document or current page only. Voices can be changed (edit>preferences>reading). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NB reading order needs to be checked. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Accessibility preferences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows reader to customise the document. Useful but limited to font and background colours. </li></ul></ul>
    24. 24. Accessibility benefits of PDFs <ul><li>Pages view </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Shows each page as a series of thumbnails – useful when looking for a particular image, allows reader to find it quickly. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Bookmarks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Similar to Document Map in Word – allows faster navigation through the document, reader able to jump to specific sections etc. Structure of Word documents picked up when converted to PDF format. </li></ul></ul>
    25. 25. So… the Technologies you can use [easily] to develop Inclusive Learning Please note – wherever you are on the spectrum from ‘technically savvy’ to ‘a bit nervous of trying new things’, you should find something that works for you (hopefully!)
    26. 26. Instant Presenter
    27. 27. Audacity <ul><li>Simple route into making podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Good introductory tutorial at http://blog.podblaze.com/public/blog/139564 </li></ul><ul><li>Can add introductory music etc simply to make a professional sounding podcast. </li></ul><ul><li>Have been used as ‘backup’ for lectures, for additional material for listening in ‘dead time’ e.g. on buses, and for adding supporting material e.g. describing current news items of relevance to the curriculum </li></ul>
    28. 28. Camstudio (with subtitles via MovieMaker) <ul><li>Choose images to be used. </li></ul><ul><li>Open Camstudio, define ‘recordable’ area, move cursor, add commentary. </li></ul><ul><li>Volunteer required to demonstrate! </li></ul><ul><li>Save avi file. </li></ul><ul><li>Open file in Windows MovieMaker </li></ul><ul><li>Add subtitles. </li></ul><ul><li>Et voila! </li></ul>
    29. 29. WINK <ul><li>Produces more flexible presentations, with image selection, flexible audio and captioning, subtitling and so on. </li></ul><ul><li>Demo on www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware under Visualisation Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Demo file </li></ul>
    30. 30. DSpeech <ul><li>Allows electronic text to be converted into ‘automatic’ podcasts using a computerised voice. </li></ul><ul><li>Computerised voices aren’t for everyone! </li></ul><ul><li>But they do add a degree of flexibility for those who do not like or have difficulty with reading, or who want to listen whilst doing other things. </li></ul><ul><li>Another Demo is available at http://www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware </li></ul><ul><li>DSpeech Demo </li></ul>
    31. 31. Mind Mapping Software <ul><li>A number of different brands to choose from. </li></ul><ul><li>Most will directly transpose a mind map into a text document (and vice versa, providing the document is structured correctly – more on this later on!) </li></ul>
    32. 32. LetMeType <ul><li>Word prediction and spell checking facility. </li></ul><ul><li>You can import glossaries of technical terms, and it will learn words as you type. </li></ul><ul><li>More at http://www.techdis.ac.uk/getfreesoftware </li></ul><ul><li>LetMeType Demo </li></ul>
    33. 33. Dasher <ul><li>A demonstration of Dasher, software that enabled a newly paraplegic staff member to return to work – superb demonstration of the power of assistive technologies </li></ul>
    34. 34. Collaboration <ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>GoogleDocs </li></ul><ul><li>Gabbly </li></ul><ul><li>Interwise </li></ul>
    35. 35. Audio / Podcasting <ul><li>Add human voice to Word ( Earlylife.doc ) </li></ul><ul><li>Text to speech isn’t always an adequate option! ( Conebearer.mp3 ) </li></ul><ul><li>PowerPoint action settings with audio clips on different images ( Iceland student example ) </li></ul><ul><li>PowerPoint action settings with audio clips on the same image </li></ul><ul><li>Camtasia, Audacity, DSpeech / Natural Reader / SayPad for Text-To-Speech </li></ul>
    36. 36. Publishers Association work 1 Guide to Alternative Formats <ul><li>Document on how to obtain alternative formats in the quickest and smoothest way is in final draft stage and should be published shortly. </li></ul><ul><li>It highlights the need for us to know exactly what we asking for and why, because the Publishers rarely understand the detail behind the request. </li></ul><ul><li>Document draft </li></ul>
    37. 37. Publishers Association work 2 Publishers LookUp <ul><li>We are in the process of developing a subsite to our website called www.publisherlookup.org.uk – each Publisher will list on there exactly what formats they offer for which titles, the price, expected lead times for productions and so on – a one-stop shop for information on alternative formats </li></ul><ul><li>Site due to go live mid-Feb - will be similar to US version – www.publisherlookup.org – but with much more detailed advice </li></ul>
    38. 38. Resources you may find useful 1 <ul><li>RoboBraille – www.robobraille.org </li></ul><ul><li>Simply email a Word document to one of their email addresses e.g. [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>You receive (normally about 5 minutes – it only takes two hours when you’re demonstrating it in a presentation!) a high quality synthetic speech MP3 to download. </li></ul><ul><li>When the URL of your MP3 comes back be aware they always put a full stop at the end which stops it from working! </li></ul>
    39. 39. Resources you may find useful 2 <ul><li>Xerte is a Learning Object Generator that is both accessible to use and produces accessible learning objects (if you use its features correctly!) </li></ul><ul><li>You can download the latest version of the tool from http://www.nottingham.ac.uk/xerte/ </li></ul><ul><li>Guidance available at: http://www.techdis.ac.uk/community/course/view.php?id=86 </li></ul><ul><li>We’re linking this to the Accessibility Passport work. </li></ul>
    40. 40. Simulations: not the real thing, but they give some idea of what it’s like <ul><li>www.techdis.ac.uk/simdis </li></ul><ul><li>www.webaim.org /simulations/... </li></ul><ul><ul><li>… screenreader.php </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… lowvision.php </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>… cognitive.php </li></ul></ul>
    41. 41. External Support <ul><li>TechDis www.techdis.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Academy and Subject Network www.heacademy.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>Netskills www.netskills.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>ALT/CMALT www.alt.ac.uk/cmalt </li></ul><ul><li>AbilityNet www.abilitynet.org.uk </li></ul><ul><li>SEDA www.seda.ac.uk </li></ul><ul><li>In-house at Plymouth: Disability Assist and EDaLT </li></ul>
    42. 42. http ://www.techdis.ac.uk/community/course/view.php?id=79 <ul><li>JISC TechDis Service </li></ul><ul><li>Higher Education Academy Building </li></ul><ul><li>Innovation Way </li></ul><ul><li>York Science Park </li></ul><ul><li>York </li></ul><ul><li>YO10 5BR </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>www.techdis.ac.uk </li></ul>

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