Ch. 17 3 pp
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  • 1. Why It MattersWe had survived our worst war, but the end ofthe Civil War left Americans to deal with a setof pressing issues. The status of some 3.5million former enslaved people had yet to bedecided. Nor had the terms by which the formerConfederate states would rejoin the Union beendecided. How Americans would handle theseissues would shape the future of our country.
  • 2. The Impact TodayDebate over the rightful power of the federalgovernment and the states continues to this day.Americans continue to wrestle with the problemof providing civil rights and equal opportunityto all citizens.
  • 3. Section 3: The South DuringReconstructionChapter ObjectivesClick the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• Identify what groups participated in the South’sReconstruction. • Explain how Southern life changed duringReconstruction.
  • 4. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.Guide to ReadingAfter the Civil War the South had to rebuild not onlyits farms and roads, but its social and politicalstructures as well. • scalawag Main IdeaKey Terms• carpetbagger • corruption • integrate • sharecropping
  • 5. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.New Groups Take Charge• The Republican Party consisted of three maingroups that dominated Southern politics:African Americans, white Southerners whosupported Republican policies, and whitesettlers from the North who moved to theSouth. (pages 509–511)- African Americans held important positions butdid not control the government of any state. - Between 1869 and 1880, sixteen AfricanAmericans served in the House and two in theSenate.
  • 6. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.New Groups Take Charge (cont.)(pages 509–511)- Hiram Revels was elected to the Senate fromMississippi in 1870 and served one year. - Blanche K. Bruce was the other senator, also fromMississippi, who was elected in 1874 and servedsix years. - The Confederates called some Southern whiteswho had opposed secession and werenonslaveholding farmers or business leadersscalawags or scoundrels. - They hated them for siding with the Republicans.
  • 7. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.New Groups Take Charge (cont.)(pages 509–511)- Many Northern whites who moved to the South andsupported the Republicans were calledcarpetbaggers by their critics. - They got the name because they carried suitcasesmade of carpet fabric with all their belongings. - Others were reformers who wanted to help reshapeSouthern society.
  • 8. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• Most white Southerners opposed efforts toexpand the rights of African Americans. • Plantation owners still tried to keep control ofthe freed people. • They kept them on the plantations and refusedto rent land to them. • Store owners refused them credit, andemployers refused them work.New Groups Take Charge (cont.)(pages 509–511)
  • 9. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• During Reconstruction secret societiescommitted violence against African Americansand white supporters of African Americans. • The Ku Klux Klan, formed in 1866, killedthem and burned their homes, churches, andschools. • The Klan’s supporters were Southerners,especially planters and Democrats who wantedto reestablish white supremacy and sawviolence as a way to attack Republicans.New Groups Take Charge (cont.)(pages 509–511)
  • 10. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• Southerners opposed to violence and terrorismappealed to the federal government. • In 1870 and 1871, Congress passed severallaws without too much success. • Some arrests were made, but most whiteSoutherners would not testify against thesepeople.New Groups Take Charge (cont.)(pages 509–511)
  • 11. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.Some Improvements• Reconstruction brought important changes,especially in education. (pages 511–512)• African Americans created their own schoolsin some regions. • The Freedmen’s Bureau and private charitiesspread the value of education. • Free African Americans from the North andNorthern women taught in the schools. • By 1870 about 4,000 schools existed and morethan half the teachers were African Americans.
  • 12. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• Public school systems for both races werecreated in the 1870s. • Generally whites and African Americansattended different schools. • More than 50 percent of white children andabout 40 percent of African Americans wentto public schools within a few years.Some Improvements (cont.)(pages 511–512)
  • 13. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• The other major change occurred in farming. • Most African Americans were not able tobuy their own land. • Instead, they rented a plot of land from alandowner along with a shack, some seed,and tools. • They became sharecroppers.Some Improvements (cont.)(pages 511–512)
  • 14. Click the mouse button or press theSpace Bar to display the information.• Sharecropping was not much better thanslavery for many because in return for the useof the land, the sharecroppers had to pay thelandowner by giving him a share of the cropsthey grew. • Barely anything was left for their families, andthey rarely had enough to sell and to make anymoney.Some Improvements (cont.)(pages 511–512)