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Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
Ch. 13.3 pp
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Ch. 13.3 pp

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This is the presentation for Chapter 13 Section 3.

This is the presentation for Chapter 13 Section 3.

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Transcript

  1. Guide to ReadingMain IdeaCotton was vital to the economy of the South. Key Terms• cotton gin • capital Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  2. Rise of the Cotton Kingdom• The economy of the South thrived by 1850 because of cotton. • It became the leading cash crop. • Tobacco and rice had been profitable in colonial times, but tobacco depended on foreign markets and the price fluctuated. • Rice could not be grown in the dry inland areas. • In the Deep South–Georgia, South Carolina, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Texas– cotton helped the economy prosper, and slavery grew stronger. (pages 397–399) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  3. Rise of the Cotton Kingdom (cont.)• Eli Whitney’s cotton gin revolutionized cotton production. • The machine removed seeds from cotton fibers. • A worker could clean only 1 pound of cotton a day by hand, but with the machine, a worker could clean 50 pounds. • The cotton gin led to the need for more workers. • Southern planters relied on enslaved laborers to plant and pick the cotton. (pages 397–399) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  4. Rise of the Cotton Kingdom (cont.)• The British textile industry created a huge demand for cotton and kept the price high. • The Deep South was committed to cotton, with some areas also growing rice and sugarcane. • The Upper South–Maryland, Virginia, and North Carolina–was also agricultural and produced tobacco, hemp, wheat, and vegetables. (pages 397–399) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  5. Rise of the Cotton Kingdom (cont.)• The value of enslaved people increased due to the reliance on them for producing cotton and sugar. • The Upper South became a center for the sale and transport of enslaved people in the region. (pages 397–399) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  6. Industry in the South• The South remained rural and agricultural. • The entire South produced fewer manufactured goods than the state of Pennsylvania in the 1860s. (pages 399–400) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  7. Industry in the South (cont.)• Several barriers to industry developed in the South:  - Because cotton was so profitable, farming was important, not new business.  - Because capital, or money to invest in business, was lacking, new industry did not develop.  - People saw no reason to sell their land or enslaved workers to raise money for industry, and they believed their economy would continue to prosper. (pages 399–400) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  8. Industry in the South (cont.) - Because the market for manufactured goods in the South was smaller than in the North, this also discouraged industrial development. - Some Southerners did not want industry. (pages 399–400) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  9. Industry in the South (cont.)• Goods were transported via natural waterways. • Most towns were along rivers or on the coast. • Roads were poor and there were few canals. • Railroad lines were mostly local and did not connect parts of a region. • By 1860 only about one-third of the rail lines were in the South. (pages 399–400) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

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