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Ch. 13.1 pp
 

Ch. 13.1 pp

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This is a short overview of Ch. 13 Section 1.

This is a short overview of Ch. 13 Section 1.

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    Ch. 13.1 pp Ch. 13.1 pp Presentation Transcript

    • Why It MattersAt the same time that national spirit and pridewere growing throughout the country, a strongsectional rivalry was also developing. BothNorth and South wanted to further their owneconomic and political interests.
    • The Impact TodayDifferences still exist between the regions of thenation but are no longer as sharp. Masscommunication and the migration of peoplefrom one region to another have lessened thedifferences.
    • Technology and Industry• Industrialization changed the way Americans worked, traveled, and communicated. • In the North, manufacturers made products by dividing tasks among workers. • They built factories to bring specialized workers together. • Products could be made more quickly. • The factory workers used machinery to do some of the work faster and more efficiently. (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.)• By 1860 factories in the Northeast produced at least two-thirds of the country’s manufactured goods. (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.)• Advances in transportation sparked the success of many new industries.  - Steamboats - Canals (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.) - Railroad growth in the 1840s and 1850s connected places that were far apart.  - Early railroads connected mines with nearby rivers.  - Horses, not locomotives, powered the early railroads.  (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.) - A railway network in 1860 of nearly 31,000 miles of track linked cities in the North and Midwest.  - Railway builders tied the eastern lines to lines built farther west so that by 1860, a network united the East and the Midwest.  - Railways transformed trade and settlement in the nation’s interior.  - With the Erie Canal and railway network between the East and West, grain, livestock, and dairy products moved directly from the Midwest to the East. (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.) - Prices were lower because goods traveled faster and more cheaply.  - People settled into Ohio, Indiana, and Illinois, and as the population of the states grew, new towns and industry developed in the Midwest. (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.)• People needed to communicate faster to keep up with the industrial growth and faster travel methods. • Samuel Morse developed the telegraph in 1844. • It used electric signals to send messages along wires. • To transmit messages, Morse developed the Morse code, using a series of dots and dashes to represent the letters of the alphabet. (pages 386–389) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Technology and Industry (cont.)• By 1852 the United States was operating about 23,000 miles of telegraph lines. (pages 386–389)
    • Agriculture• Farmers were able to sell their products in new markets as a result of the railroads and canals. • New inventions changed farming methods and also encouraged settlers to develop larger areas in the West thought to be too difficult to farm.  (page 390) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
    • Agriculture (cont.)• Agriculture was not a mainstay of the North. • Farming the rocky soil was difficult. • Instead, the North continued to grow industrially. • More and more people worked in factories, and the problems connected with factory labor also grew. (page 390) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.