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16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
16 1 pp
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16 1 pp

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This is the presentation for Chapter 16 section 1.

This is the presentation for Chapter 16 section 1.

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Chapter ObjectivesSection 1: The Two Sides• Explain why the border states played an important part in the war. • Compare Northern and Southern populations, industries, resources, and war aims. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 2. Why It MattersThe Civil War–a war in which Americansfought other Americans–transformed the UnitedStates. It shattered the economyof the South while contributing to the rapideconomic growth of the North and the West.African Americans gained freedom whenslavery was abolished, but the war left a legacyof bitterness between North and South thatlasted for generations.
  • 3. The Impact TodayKey events during this era still shape our livestoday. For example: • The institution of slavery was abolished. • The war established the power of the federal government over the states. Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 4. Guide to ReadingMain IdeaBoth the North and the South had strengths andweaknesses that helped determine their militarystrategies. Key Terms• border state  • Rebel • blockade  • Yankee• offensive  Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 5. Choosing Sides• Seven states left the Union and formed the Confederacy in February 1861. • Four more states joined in April: Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas. • The capital was Richmond, Virginia, about 100 miles south from the Union’s capital of Washington, D.C. (pages 460–462) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 6. Choosing Sides (cont.)• The border states of Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, and Delaware stayed in the Union but were divided over which side to support. • They played an important part in the war because of their location, and they would seriously damage the North if they seceded.  - Missouri could control parts of the Mississippi River and major routes west.  - Kentucky controlled the Ohio River. (pages 460–462) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 7. Choosing Sides (cont.) - Delaware was close to the North’s important city of Philadelphia.  - Maryland was very close to Richmond, had important railroad lines, and had the Union’s capital of Washington, D.C., within its borders. • In April a mob in Baltimore attacked Northern troops. Confederate sympathizers burned railroad lines and cut the telegraph line to Washington, isolating it. (pages 460–462) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 8. Choosing Sides (cont.)• Lincoln had to be cautious in his response so as not to upset the people of the border states and especially Maryland. • He ended up arresting people who supported secession. • His approach worked. The border states remained in the Union, but many of the citizens joined Southern armies. (pages 460–462) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 9. Choosing Sides (cont.)• Most white Southerners supported secession, but people in the Appalachian region of Tennessee and Virginia opposed it. • In Virginia a movement to secede from the state and rejoin the Union grew. • The separate state of West Virginia joined the Union in 1863. (pages 460–462) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 10. Comparing North and South• Both sides had advantages and disadvantages. The following were the North’s advantages:  - a larger population  - more resources  - more industry  - more ships  - a better banking system to help raise money  - regular navy members who were mostly loyal to the Union  - a larger and more efficient railway system  - Abraham Lincoln’s dedication, intelligence, skill, and humanity (pages 462–463) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 11. Comparing North and South (cont.)• The following were the North’s disadvantages:  - In order to bring the Southern states back into the Union it would have to invade and hold the South.  - Many people believed the South had a good chance of winning. (pages 462–463) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 12. Comparing North and South (cont.)• The following were the Southern advantages:  - strong support for the war from the white population  - troops fighting on their own land  - superior military leadership at first (General Robert E. Lee) (pages 462–463) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 13. Comparing North and South (cont.)• The following were the South’s disadvantages:  - a smaller population  - few factories  - fewer resources, including an inferior railroad system with fewer than half the miles of track and fewer trains than the North  - belief in states’ right that limited a strong central government’s power (pages 462–463) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 14. Comparing North and South (cont.)• War goals were different. The North at first wanted to bring the Southern states back into the Union and later wanted to also end slavery. The Union’s plan had three parts:  - Blockade Southern ports to prevent supplies from entering and cotton from being exported.  - Gain control of the Mississippi River to cut Southern supply lines and to split the Confederacy.  - Capture Richmond, the Confederate capital. (pages 462–463) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 15. Comparing North and South (cont.)• The South’s goal was to win recognition as an independent nation so the South could preserve its traditional way of life, including slavery. Its strategy included the following:  - holding on to as much territory as possible until the North tired of fighting  - having Britain and France pressure the North to end the war  - sometimes going on the attack by moving north to threaten Washington, D.C., and other Northern cities (pages 462–463) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 16. American People at War• Soldiers came from all walks of life although many came from farms. • One difficult aspect of the Civil War was that Americans were fighting other Americans. • The average soldier’s age was 25 years, but about 40 percent were 21 or younger. • A soldier’s term was 90 days at first, but then became longer when the war did not end quickly. (pages 463–464) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 17. American People at War (cont.)• The number of soldiers from the North and South differed greatly. • By the summer of 1861, the Confederate army, also called Rebels, had about 112,000 soldiers. The Union, or Yankee, soldiers numbered about 187,000. • By the end of the war, about 850,000 men fought for the Confederacy, and about 2.1 million men fought for the Union. • About 200,000 African Americans fought for the Union, and about 10,000 Hispanics fought in the conflict. (pages 463–464) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.
  • 18. American People at War (cont.)• Both sides expected the war to end quickly. • Some leaders saw the war would be a long one. • Northern General William Tecumseh Sherman predicted a very long war, and his prediction was accurate. (pages 463–464) Click the mouse button or press the Space Bar to display the information.

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