• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Private Content
Can invisible also be amazing? Designing fluid and connected experiences
 

Can invisible also be amazing? Designing fluid and connected experiences

on

  • 5,464 views

Can invisible also be amazing? Designing fluid and connected experiences. Fjord @mobilize in San Francisco September 2011 presented by Fjord CEO Olof Schybergson. For more information:

Can invisible also be amazing? Designing fluid and connected experiences. Fjord @mobilize in San Francisco September 2011 presented by Fjord CEO Olof Schybergson. For more information:
www.fjordnet.com
Twitter @fjord

Statistics

Views

Total Views
5,464
Views on SlideShare
5,455
Embed Views
9

Actions

Likes
18
Downloads
121
Comments
0

3 Embeds 9

https://twimg0-a.akamaihd.net 5
https://si0.twimg.com 3
http://us-w1.rockmelt.com 1

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Can invisible also be amazing? Designing fluid and connected experiences Can invisible also be amazing? Designing fluid and connected experiences Presentation Transcript

    • CAN INVISIBLE ALSO BE AMAZING?Designing fluid and connected experiencesMobilize, September 26th 2011Olof Schybergson, CEO, Fjord@fjord @olof_s
    • WHAT WE DO AT FJORD …or how to summarize 10 years and 1,000 projects into one slideSlide 2 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • WE DESIGN LEADING CROSS-PLATFORM SERVICES We work with leading companies in their field.Slide 3 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • WE ALSO DO SOME THINGS BEYOND CLIENT WORK TOUCH TO PAY – PIMP YOUR LIFE, NOW WITH YOUR GAMING STYLE IPHONE THE TABLET TRANSFORMS WORK AS WE Trends research KNOW IT Research about smart objects & environments SMART OBJECTS CONNECT WITH THE MAINSTREAMSlide 4 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DESIGNING SMART SERVICES …and what we’ve learned from Smarcos* in the last 18 months* About Smarcos: http://vimeo.com/24511479 Slide 5 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DISCOVERY 1: There’s a lot of research into technical aspects, not much into human aspectsSlide 6 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DIGITAL CONTEXT IS MADE UP OF TWO ELEMENTS TECHNICAL HUMANSlide 7 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DIGITAL CONTEXT IS MADE UP OF TWO ELEMENTS Things you can detect with sensors, derive from a user’s data. HUMANSlide 8 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DIGITAL CONTEXT IS MADE UP OF TWO ELEMENTS Things you can detect with sensors, derive from a user’s data. The bigger picture of human behavior. Can be studied but may not be detectable.Slide 9 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DIGITAL CONTEXT IS MADE UP OF TWO ELEMENTS MOVEMENT PREFERENCES HEART SOCIAL RATE TIME OF DAY PEOPLE NETWORK NEARBY USAGE PATTERNS LOCATION CALENDAR WEATHER DEVICE SCHEDULE NUANCES OF BEHAVIOUR GROUP DYNAMICS MOOD ETIQUETTE MEANINGS OF DESIRES EXPECTATIONS RELATIONSHIPS LIKES AND GOALS DISLIKESSlide 10 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DISCOVERY 2: ‘Smarter’ services aren’t automatically ‘better’Slide 11 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • There is tendency to think of ‘smart’ in terms of what can be detected. Like your location. From this perspective, better sensing technologies lead to smarter services.Slide 12 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • THE MYTH: If a system can detect enough data about a person, it can understand them and create a better experience.Slide 13 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • THE MYTH USER EXPERIENCE CONTEXT AWARENESSSlide 14 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • THIS IGNORES HUMAN TRAITS Culture, mood, etiquette – and pure human weirdness – makes it hard to design really smart services for peopleSlide 15 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • DIGITAL SOLUTIONS OFFER CLEAR BENEFITS Slide 16 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • BUT AT A COST Source: slashgear.com Slide 17 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • People are wary of these costs. Things like… Loss of control Lack of privacy Distraction Annoyance The costs are barriers to success. But success canbe achieved if the user benefits outweigh the costs. Slide 18 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • ANOTHER EXAMPLE FACEBOOK FACE RECOGNITION CONNECTS PEOPLE’S IMAGES TO THEIR SOCIAL NETWORK… “its new face-recognition feature could become the latest example of a seemingly innocuous development morphing into a serious threat to the privacy of our (visual) data.” -Megan Geuss, PC World …BUT SOME PEOPLE FIND IT INTRUSIVESlide 19 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • THE MOST FAMOUS EXAMPLE MICROSOFT’S PAPER CLIP. SUPPOSED TO BE HELPFUL… “one of the worst software design blunders in the annals of computing” - Smithsonian Magazine …BUT PEOPLE HATED ITSlide 20 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Office_Assistant
    • THE REALITY USER EXPERIENCE THE MYTH THE REALITY CONTEXT AWARENESSSlide 21 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • WHERE HAVE WE SEEN THIS BEFORE? THE UNCANNY VALLEY UNCANNY VALLEY + bunraku healthy puppet person humanoid robot FAMILIARITY industrial robot HUMAN LIKENESS 50% 100% prosthetic hand - zombie Slide 22 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Uncanny_valley
    • THIS ROBOT IS CUTE Slide 23 © Fjord 2011 | ConfidentialSource: ApriPoko, Toshiba
    • THIS ROBOT IS NOT QUITE RIGHT – IT’S CREEPY Slide 24 © Fjord 2011 | ConfidentialSource: cubo.cc
    • CONTEXT AWARE SERVICES EXIST HEREUSER EXPERIENCE LOCAL SEARCH SAT NAV CONTEXT AWARENESSSlide 25 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • WE ARE TRYING TO GET THEREUSER EXPERIENCE LOCAL SEARCH SAT NAV CONTEXT AWARENESSSlide 26 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • BUT WE KEEP FALLING DOWN HEREUSER EXPERIENCE LOCAL SEARCH SAT NAV MICROSOFT PAPERCLIP COLOR APP CONTEXT IPHONE LOCATION TRACKING AWARENESS FACEBOOK FACIAL RECOGNITIONSlide 27 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • A FAILED CONTEXT AWARE SYSTEM •  Misunderstands your needs •  Removes options based on what it (wrongly) thinks you want •  Acts on your behalf without your approval (explicit or implicit) THE ABYSS •  Shares inappropriately •  Does not understand your culture or social relationships •  Offers unsolicited adviceSlide 28 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • THERE ARE TWO SWEET SPOTS SWEET SPOT 2 SWEETUSER EXPERIENCE SPOT 1 CONTEXT AWARENESSSlide 29 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • FROM THEORY TO APPLIED …two examples of future mobile services in sweet spot 2Slide 30 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • SCENARIO 1 - CONSUMPTION 2.0 Xavier 30 years old, lives in London, gadget journalist, trendsetter, lots of online followers Slide 31 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • He walks down the high street, past a Zara flagship store and as he is walking past the windows, screens start to change and include some of the images from Xaviers different digital trails: His Pinterest boards, things he bookmarked and liked. We see a picture of theXavier notices a new piece of street art and street art he just snapped earlier. The window displays derive colour and style input fromtakes a picture of it, adding it to his flickr some of his pictures and update the Zara clothing they display, showing more of the male Slide 32 © Fjord 2011 | Confidentialstream. collection and matching them to what Xavier might like.
    • On entering the store, Xavier walks overbig interactive screens in the floor. Theyimmediately react to him and greet him withWelcome back, Xavier!, displaying hiscurrent Zara score’. His phone vibrates lightly and as he takes it out of his pockets, he notices a Zara InStore app being streamed to his device. The visual style of the icon communicates that this is a streamed app, only available Launching it, it presents recommendations that Slide 33 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential temporarily and while in this store. fit his style.
    • Holding the phone up intothe air activates anAugmented Reality mode,helping Xavier to find theitems in the store.Xavier walks up to one of therecommended items, a pairof shoes, and points hisphone at them. This giveshim more details about theproduct; available colours,the popularity of this item,recommended items that gowith it. It also offers him adeal based on his Zarascore letting him save somemoney when he buys twoitems together. Slide 34 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • Having made his decision onwhich items he buys, he canpay for them on the phoneusing an account of hischoice. Leaving the store,the floor screen displays athank you message as wellas his updated Zara score Slide 35 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • Later that day, Xavier isputting on his new items ashe prepares for a night out.He tweets about going outand about wearing his newclothes. Checking his Zaraapp, he then notices how itvisualises his Zara scoreincreasing. 36 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential Slide
    • KEY INSIGHTS Themes & technologies: •  Location sensitive experiences (GPS, NFC) •  Using social streams (Pinterest, Twitter, Like, Flickr)No room for push advertising •  Responsive public screens (NFC,People receive different incentives based on their WIFI)status and profile •  Image search, image recognition. •  Augmented RealityPeople sell their identity •  Location based app streamingPrivacy is ‘negotiated’ between the individual and •  Intelligent clothes (RFID) •  Cloud servicescorporations, no one company ‘owns’ the identity •  Two advertising models: •  Using public digitalDeep adaptation infrastructure •  Targeting social mediaInteractive experiences are deeply tailored around influencers with incentivesthe individual, based on context and profile Slide 37 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • SCENARIO 2 – TIME CREATOR Vanessa 36, single mother in Los Angeles, no permanent job but does temp work, struggles to keep routine up Slide 38 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • She glimpses at the screen on her way out and sees that the phone is showing her the location of the closest Zipcar, where she needs to drive to, and what traffic and weather are like.Vanessa is rushed to leave work and drive to pick up her kids. She grabs her purse,handbag, keys and phone. As she grabs the phone, it vibrates lightly and the display Slide 39 © Fjord 2011 | Confidentialturns on to grab her attention.
    • The phone lays on the passenger seat and now uses speech as both output and input. ItWalking down the street, she touches her phone notifies Vanessa that it updated the route to avoid traffic and asks whether it shouldon the Zipcar to unlock it, gets in and drives off. reserve a parking spot near the destination. Vanessa responds yes and the phone confirms that it has found and reserved a spot. The car navigation system is being updated to guide her directly to where it is. Slide 40 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • Rather than a text message, the request is coming straight through a service Vanessa uses to privately rent out her washing machine to her friends and neighbours. The request also displays the amount of money Linda is going to pay for this.She arrives and parks. As she gets out her phone displays an incoming request from her Slide 41 © Fjord 2011 | Confidentialneighbour, Linda, who would like to use her washing machine tonight.
    • This also updates her phone with the latest information about what her kids did that day, what homework theyVanessa enters the primary school and her kids run towards her. She ticks her name on a screen have, how much physical activity they Slide 42 © Fjord 2011 | Confidentialon the wall, confirming that she has picked up her kids. did and what food they had.
    • In the car driving back home, Vanessa asks her kids what they would like to eat for dinner. She launches her food app in order to getrecommendations for meals based on the ingredients she still has in her kitchen and what the kids had for lunch. The windows in the back ofthe car turn into touch screens, displaying images of the dishes that respond to the cars movements in an entertaining way (e.g. gherkin slides Slide 43 © Fjord 2011 | Confidentialof a plate as the car makes a turn). The kids swipe through the images to decide what they would like.
    • After they decided on a meal, the food app lists the missing ingredients and suggests a small detour to pick them up from a shop where some Slide 44 © Fjord 2011 | Confidentialof these ingredients are currently on offer.
    • KEY INSIGHTS Themes & technologies: •  Context sensing / adaptation •  Internet of Things – car sharing service by phone, reservable parking, smart noticeboardService mashups •  Multi modal input/outputMobile as a catalyst for convergence – across (speech recognition, speechindustries, environments, and business models output) •  Micro payments / private people selling servicesA PA for the rest of us •  Quantified self / physiologicalMobile assistant services will revolutionize the life monitoring •  Quantified health and fitnessof ‘normal’ people (physiological sensors, heart rate, pedometers, galvanic skinDigital becomes physical response) •  Gamification (kids choosingDigital services will increasingly dissolve into the meal)physical world Slide 45 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • SO WHAT DID WE LEARN? …the overall conclusions about smart servicesSlide 46 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • KEY TAKEAWAYS 1 The user is the OS 2 Privacy is a currency 3 Digital becomes physical 4 The mashup economy needs orchestratorsSlide 47 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential
    • Let’s be smart about smart services :-) thank you. @fjord @olof_s olof@fjordnet.com www.fjordnet.comSlide 48 © Fjord 2011 | Confidential