Edtc 6340 copyright_2_ernie_vela

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I have changed the font from veranda to Times New Roman as suggested by the Burmark book and have added some illustrations as suggested. **I have now changed the colors to the recommended color of blue background with yellow letters. I have also reduced the amount of text and added some clipart.**

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  • The author is usually the owner.Except when the work-for-hire rule appliesAn author is someone who contributes copyrightable expression to the work.Unless the work for hire rules apply, the creators of the work are its authors and owners.
  • The owner reserves the right to manage how their work is to be used…Unlimited copyingCopy and distribution rightsDownloading contentStudent use onlyCommercial use only
  • Mass of networked mass not on the surfaceSpecialized search enginesInvisible web specialistsInformation specialists
  • Public Domain – belonging or being available to the public as a whole. Not subject to copyright.Orphan Works - they often lack sufficient information to identify their owners, identifying the date on which they would otherwise enter the public domain is also impossible.
  • Not everything is public domain - Once expression is committed to a tangible medium (and computer media is considered tangible), copyright protection is automatic.
  • means that you knew you were infringing and you did it anyway.Ignorance is not an excuse.One special provision of the lawthe good faith fair use defense- only applies if the person who copied material reasonably believed that what he or she did was a fair use
  • Archiving lost, stolen, damaged or deteriorating worksMaking copies for library patronsMaking copies for other libraries’ patrons (interlibrary loan)
  • Edtc 6340 copyright_2_ernie_vela

    1. 1. Copyright<br />The Basics<br />
    2. 2. Who owns what?<br />Is this now mine?<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    3. 3. Managing Copyrights<br />The owner reserves the right to manage how their work is to be used…<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    4. 4. The Invisible Web<br />Texas digital sanborn maps<br />ERIC<br />American Periodical Series<br />Virtual Instrument museum<br />Mathscinet<br />
    5. 5. Public Domain vs. Orphan Works<br />Public Domain ---Belongs to everyone…<br />Orphan Works - they often lack sufficient information to identify their owners.<br />Proud Prostitiute<br />I was abandoned……sniff…<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    6. 6. Using materials from the Internet<br />Not everything is public domain<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    7. 7. Using materials from the Internet<br />Implied License<br /> limited license to use work <br /> Expressed License<br /> has detailed rights<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    8. 8. Creative Commons<br />Information will be shared with others<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    9. 9. Individual Liability for Infringement <br />you knew you were infringing and you did it anyway.<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    10. 10. What work is Protected?<br />Works that lack originality<br />Works in public domain<br />Freeware<br />US Government works<br />Facts<br />Ideas, processes, methods, and systems described in copyrighted works.<br />
    11. 11. Work published on or before 12/31/1922 is now public domain<br />Works published between 01/01/1923 & 12/31/1978, inclusive, are protected for a term of 99 years from the date of publication<br />if copyright is not renewed, work published between 1923 & 12/31/1963 are now public domain.<br />After 1978, copyrights now are “life of author” plus 70 years. <br />What work is Protected?<br />That’s still mine!!!<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    12. 12. Specific, Narrowly tailored exemptions<br />We’ve got to save this thing before we can’t use it anymore!!!<br />Picture courtesy of clip art <br />
    13. 13. Fair use exemption<br />Coursepacks, reserves, course management systems and other platforms for distributing course content<br />Image archives<br />Creative uses<br />Research copies<br />
    14. 14. Fair Use Test<br />1. Character of the use?<br />2. Nature of the work to be used?<br />3. How much of the work will you use?<br />4. What effect would this use have on the market for the original or for permissions is the use were widespread?<br />
    15. 15. Bibliography<br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/flowofcopyright.html<br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/whoowns.html <br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/cprtmgt.html<br />Creative Commons Attribution. Retrieved from http://creativecommons.org/<br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/digitallibrary.html<br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/pdandorphan.html<br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/useofweb.html<br />Harper, G. (2007, January 01). Copyright crash course. Retrieved from http://copyright.lib.utexas.edu/copypol2.html<br />

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