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There are approximately 80,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. This makes excessive alcohol use the 3rd leading lifestyle-related cause of death for the …

There are approximately 80,000 deaths attributable to excessive alcohol use each year in the United States. This makes excessive alcohol use the 3rd leading lifestyle-related cause of death for the nation. Excessive alcohol use is responsible for 2.3 million years of potential life lost (YPLL) annually, or an average of about 30 years of potential life lost for each death. In 2006, there were more than 1.2 million emergency room visits and 2.7 million physician office visits due to excessive drinking. The economic costs of excessive alcohol consumption in 2006 were estimated at $223.5 billion.


The Standard Measure of Alcohol
In the United States, a standard drink is any drink that contains 0.6 ounces (14.0 grams or 1.2 tablespoons) of pure alcohol. Generally, this amount of pure alcohol is found in:



-- 12-ounces of regular beer or wine cooler.


-- 8-ounces of malt liquor.


-- 5-ounces of wine.


-- 1.5-ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits or liquor (e.g., gin, rum, vodka, whiskey).


 
Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol
Excessive drinking includes heavy drinking, binge drinking, and any drinking by pregnant women or underage youth.


Binge drinking, the most common form of excessive alcohol consumption, is defined as consuming:



-- For women, 4 or more drinks during a single occasion.


-- For men, 5 or more drinks during a single occasion.


-- Heavy drinking is defined as consuming


-- For women, more than 1 drink per day on average.


-- For men, more than 2 drinks per day on average.


-- Most people who binge drink are not alcoholics or alcohol dependent.




According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so in moderation, which is defined as no more than 1 drink per day for women and no more than 2 drinks per day for men.5 However, there are some persons who should not drink any alcohol, including those who are:



-- Pregnant or trying to become pregnant.


-- Taking prescription or over-the-counter medications that may cause harmful reactions when mixed with alcohol.


-- Younger than age 21.


-- Recovering from alcoholism or are unable to control the amount they drink.


-- Suffering from a medical condition that may be worsened by alcohol.


-- Driving, planning to drive, or participating in other activities requiring skill, coordination, and alertness.




Immediate Health Risks
Excessive alcohol use has immediate effects that increase the risk of many harmful health conditions. These immediate effects are most often the result of binge drinking and include the following—

-- Unintentional injuries, including traffic injuries, falls, drownings, burns, and unintentional firearm injuries.

-- Violence, including intimate partner violence and child maltreatment. About 35% of victims report that offenders are under the influence of alcohol.7 Alcohol use is also associated with 2 out of 3 incidents of intimate partner violence. Studies have also shown that alcohol is a leading

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  • 1. http://www.fitango.com/categories.php?id=622Fitango EducationHealth TopicsGiving it up
  • 2. 1Alcohol Use and HealthThere are approximately 80,000 deathsattributable to excessive alcohol use each year inthe United States. This makes excessive alcohol usethe 3rd leading lifestyle-related cause of death forthe nation. Excessive alcohol use is responsible for2.3 million years of potential life lost (YPLL)annually, or an average of about 30 years ofpotential life lost for each death. In 2006, therewere more than 1.2 million emergency room visitsand 2.7 million physician office visits due toexcessive dri
  • 3. 2Alcohol Use and Health**The Standard Measure of Alcohol**In the United States, a standard drink is any drinkthat contains 0.6 ounces (14.0 grams or 1.2tablespoons) of pure alcohol. Generally, thisamount of pure alcohol is found in:-- 12-ounces of regular beer or wine cooler.
  • 4. 3Alcohol Use and Health**The Standard Measure of Alcohol**-- 8-ounces of malt liquor.-- 5-ounces of wine.-- 1.5-ounces of 80-proof distilled spirits or liquor(e.g., gin, rum, vodka, whiskey).
  • 5. 4Alcohol Use and Health**Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol**Excessive drinking includes heavy drinking, bingedrinking, and any drinking by pregnant women orunderage youth.Binge drinking, the most common form ofexcessive alcohol consumption, is defined asconsuming:
  • 6. 5Alcohol Use and Health**Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol**-- For women, 4 or more drinks during a singleoccasion.-- For men, 5 or more drinks during a singleoccasion.-- Heavy drinking is defined as consuming-- For women, more than 1 drink per day onaverage.
  • 7. 6Alcohol Use and Health**Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol**-- For men, more than 2 drinks per day on average.-- Most people who binge drink are not alcoholicsor alcohol dependent.
  • 8. 7Alcohol Use and Health**Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol**According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans,if you drink alcoholic beverages, do so inmoderation, which is defined as no more than 1drink per day for women and no more than 2drinks per day for men.5 However, there are somepersons who should not drink any alcohol,including those who are:-- Pregnant or trying to become pregnant.
  • 9. 8Alcohol Use and Health**Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol**-- Taking prescription or over-the-countermedications that may cause harmful reactionswhen mixed with alcohol.-- Younger than age 21.-- Recovering from alcoholism or are unable tocontrol the amount they drink.
  • 10. 9Alcohol Use and Health**Definitions of Patterns of Drinking Alcohol**-- Suffering from a medical condition that may beworsened by alcohol.-- Driving, planning to drive, or participating inother activities requiring skill, coordination, andalertness.
  • 11. 10Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**Excessive alcohol use has immediate effects thatincrease the risk of many harmful healthconditions. These immediate effects are mostoften the result of binge drinking and include thefollowing—-- Unintentional injuries, including traffic injuries,falls, drownings, burns, and unintentional firearminjuries.
  • 12. 11Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**-- Violence, including intimate partner violence andchild maltreatment. About 35% of victims reportthat offenders are under the influence of alcohol.7Alcohol use is also associated with 2 out of 3incidents of intimate partner violence. Studieshave also shown that alcohol is a leading factor inchild maltreatment and neglect cases, and is themost frequent substance abused among theseparents.
  • 13. 12Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**-- Risky sexual behaviors, including unprotectedsex, sex with multiple partners, and increased riskof sexual assault. These behaviors can result inunintended pregnancy or sexually transmitteddiseases.-- Miscarriage and stillbirth among pregnantwomen, and a combination of physical and mentalbirth defects among children that last throughoutlife.
  • 14. 13Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**-- Alcohol poisoning, a medical emergency thatresults from high blood alcohol levels thatsuppress the central nervous system and can causeloss of consciousness, low blood pressure andbody temperature, coma, respiratory depression,or death.**Long-Term Health Risks**
  • 15. 14Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**Over time, excessive alcohol use can lead to thedevelopment of chronic diseases, neurologicalimpairments and social problems. These includebut are not limited to—-- Neurological problems, including dementia,stroke and neuropathy.-- Cardiovascular problems, including myocardialinfarction, cardiomyopathy, atrial fibrillation andhypertension.
  • 16. 15Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**-- Psychiatric problems, including depression,anxiety, and suicide.-- Social problems, including unemployment, lostproductivity, and family problems.-- Cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, liver,colon, and breast.20 In general, the risk of cancerincreases with increasing amounts of alcohol.
  • 17. 16Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**-- Liver diseases, including—-- Alcoholic hepatitis.-- Cirrhosis, which is among the 15 leading causesof all deaths in the United States.-- Among persons with Hepatitis C virus, worseningof liver function and interference with medicationsused to treat this condition.
  • 18. 17Alcohol Use and Health**Immediate Health Risks**-- Other gastrointestinal problems, includingpancreatitis and gastritis.
  • 19. 18ConcernsDrinking is a problem if it causes trouble in yourrelationships, in school, in social activities, or inhow you think and feel. If you are concerned thateither you or someone in your family might have adrinking problem, consult your personal healthcare provider.
  • 20. 19Help for OthersConsult your personal health care provider if youfeel you or someone you know has a drinkingproblem. Other resources include the NationalDrug and Alcohol Treatment Referral RoutingService available at 1-800-662-HELP. This servicecan provide you with information about treatmentprograms in your local community and allow youto speak with someone about alcohol problems.
  • 21. 20Health risksExcessive drinking both in the form of heavydrinking or binge drinking, is associated withnumerous health problems, including—
  • 22. 21Health risks-- Chronic diseases such as liver cirrhosis (damageto liver cells); pancreatitis (inflammation of thepancreas); various cancers, including liver, mouth,throat, larynx (the voice box), and esophagus; highblood pressure; and psychological disorders.-- Unintentional injuries, such as motor-vehicletraffic crashes, falls, drowning, burns and firearminjuries.
  • 23. 22Health risks-- Violence, such as child maltreatment, homicide,and suicide.-- Harm to a developing fetus if a woman drinkswhile pregnant, such as fetal alcohol spectrumdisorders.-- Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS).-- Alcohol abuse or dependence.
  • 24. 23Heavy DrinkingFor men, heavy drinking is typically defined asconsuming an average of more than 2 drinks perday. For women, heavy drinking is typically definedas consuming an average of more than 1 drink perday.
  • 25. 24How to cut back on alcoholIf you are drinking too much, you can improve yourlife and health by cutting down. How do you knowif you drink too much? Read these questions andanswer "yes" or "no":Do you drink alone when you feel angry or sad?Does your drinking ever make you late for work?
  • 26. 25How to cut back on alcoholDoes your drinking worry your family?Do you ever drink after telling yourself you wont?Do you ever forget what you did while you weredrinking?Do you get headaches or have a hang-over afteryou have been drinking?
  • 27. 26How to cut back on alcoholIf you answered "yes" to any of these questions,you may have a drinking problem. Check with yourdoctor to be sure. Your doctor will be able to tellyou whether you should cut down or abstain. Ifyou are alcoholic or have other medical problems,you should not just cut down on your drinking--you should stop drinking completely. Your doctorwill advise you about what is right for you.
  • 28. 27How to cut back on alcoholIf your doctor tells you to cut down on yourdrinking, these steps can help you:1. Write your reasons for cutting down or stopping.
  • 29. 28How to cut back on alcoholWhy do you want to drink less? There are manyreasons why you may want to cut down or stopdrinking. You may want to improve your health,sleep better, or get along better with your family orfriends. Make a list of the reasons you want todrink less.2. Set a drinking goal.
  • 30. 29How to cut back on alcoholChoose a limit for how much you will drink. Youmay choose to cut down or not to drink at all. Ifyou are cutting down, keep below these limits:Women: No more than one drink a dayMen: No more than two drinks a dayA drink is:
  • 31. 30How to cut back on alcohola 12-ounce bottle of beer;a 5-ounce glass of wine; ora 1 1/2-ounce shot of liquor.These limits may be too high for some people whohave certain medical problems or who are older.Talk with your doctor about the limit that is rightfor you.
  • 32. 31How to cut back on alcoholNow--write your drinking goal on a piece of paper.Put it where you can see it, such as on yourrefrigerator or bathroom mirror. Your paper mightlook like this:
  • 33. 32How to cut back on alcohol**My drinking goal**I will start on this day ____________.I will not drink more than ______ drinks in 1 day.I will not drink more than ______ drinks in 1week.or
  • 34. 33How to cut back on alcohol**My drinking goal**I will stop drinking alcohol.3. Keep a "diary" of your drinking.
  • 35. 34How to cut back on alcohol**My drinking goal**To help you reach your goal, keep a "diary" of yourdrinking. For example, write down every time youhave a drink for 1 week. Try to keep your diary for3 or 4 weeks. This will show you how much youdrink and when. You may be surprised. Howdifferent is your goal from the amount you drinknow? Use the "drinking diary" below to writedown when you drink.
  • 36. 35How to cut back on alcohol**My drinking goal**Week: # of drinkstype of drinksplaceconsumedMon.Tues.Wed.Thurs.Fri.Sat.Sun.Nowyou know why you want to drink less and you havea goal. There are many ways you can help yourselfto cut down. Try these tips:**Watch it at home**Keep a small amount or no alcohol at home. Dontkeep temptations around.
  • 37. 36How to cut back on alcohol**Drink slowly**When you drink, sip your drink slowly. Take a breakof 1 hour between drinks. Drink soda, water, orjuice after a drink with alcohol. Do not drink on anempty stomach! Eat food when you are drinking.
  • 38. 37How to cut back on alcohol**Take a break from alcohol**Pick a day or two each week when you will notdrink at all. Then, try to stop drinking for 1 week.Think about how you feel physically andemotionally on these days. When you succeed andfeel better, you may find it easier to cut down forgood.
  • 39. 38How to cut back on alcohol**Learn how to say NO**You do not have to drink when other people drink.You do not have to take a drink that is given to you.Practice ways to say no politely. For example, youcan tell people you feel better when you drink less.Stay away from people who give you a hard timeabout not drinking.
  • 40. 39How to cut back on alcohol**Stay active**.What would you like to do instead of drinking? Usethe time and money spent on drinking to dosomething fun with your family or friends. Go outto eat, see a movie, or play sports or a game.
  • 41. 40How to cut back on alcohol**Get support**Cutting down on your drinking may be difficult attimes. Ask your family and friends for support tohelp you reach your goal. Talk to your doctor if youare having trouble cutting down. Get the help youneed to reach your goal.
  • 42. 41How to cut back on alcohol**Watch out for temptations**Watch out for people, places, or times that makeyou drink, even if you do not want to. Stay awayfrom people who drink a lot or bars where youused to go. Plan ahead of time what you will do toavoid drinking when you are tempted.
  • 43. 42How to cut back on alcohol**Watch out for temptations**Do not drink when you are angry or upset or havea bad day. These are habits you need to break ifyou want to drink less.**DO NOT GIVE UP!**
  • 44. 43How to cut back on alcohol**Watch out for temptations**Most people do not cut down or give up drinkingall at once. Just like a diet, it is not easy to change.That is okay. If you do not reach your goal the firsttime, try again. Remember, get support frompeople who care about you and want to help. Donot give up!