Diabetes Prevention

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Prediabetes: Am I at risk?


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 of every 3 U.S. adults had prediabetes in 2010. That is 79 million Americans aged 20 years or older. The vast majority of people living with prediabetes do not know they have it.


People with prediabetes have blood glucose (blood sugar) levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes and are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke.


If you have prediabetes, you are 5 to15 times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than people with normal blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. When you take steps to prevent type 2 diabetes, you also lower your risk for possible complications of diabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage, and other health problems.


Many factors increase your risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. To find out more about your risk, see which characteristics in this list apply to you.



-- I am 45 years of age or older.


-- I am overweight.


-- I have a parent with diabetes.


-- I have a sister or brother with diabetes.


-- My family background is African American, Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander.


-- I had diabetes while I was pregnant (gestational diabetes), or I gave birth to a baby weighing 9 pounds or more.


-- I am physically active less than three times a week.

It is important to find out early if you have prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, because early treatment can prevent serious problems that diabetes can cause, such as loss of eyesight or kidney damage.


Find out if you could have prediabetes by taking the screening test on this page. If the test shows you could have prediabetes, talk to a health care provider as soon as possible.


If you are 45 years of age or older, you should consider getting a blood test from a health care provider for prediabetes and diabetes, especially if you are overweight.


If your test results indicate you have prediabetes you should enroll in an evidence-based lifestyle program to lower your chances of getting type 2 diabetes. Studies show that people with prediabetes can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing 5% to 7% of their weight—that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person. Weight loss should be achieved by making lasting lifestyle changes to improve nutrition and increase physical activity.


If your blood test showed you have prediabetes you should also have your blood glucose (blood sugar) levels checked again in 6 months to 1 year.

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Diabetes Prevention

  1. 1. http://www.fitango.com/categories.php?id=617Fitango EducationHealth TopicsDiabetes Prevention
  2. 2. 1Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**The Centers for Disease Control and Preventionestimates that 1 of every 3 U.S. adults hadprediabetes in 2010. That is 79 million Americansaged 20 years or older. The vast majority of peopleliving with prediabetes do not know they have it.
  3. 3. 2Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**People with prediabetes have blood glucose (bloodsugar) levels that are higher than normal, but nothigh enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetesand are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes,heart disease, and stroke.
  4. 4. 3Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**If you have prediabetes, you are 5 to15 times morelikely to develop type 2 diabetes than people withnormal blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. Whenyou take steps to prevent type 2 diabetes, you alsolower your risk for possible complications ofdiabetes such as heart disease, stroke, kidneydisease, blindness, nerve damage, and otherhealth problems.
  5. 5. 4Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**Many factors increase your risk for prediabetesand type 2 diabetes. To find out more about yourrisk, see which characteristics in this list apply toyou.-- I am 45 years of age or older.-- I am overweight.-- I have a parent with diabetes.
  6. 6. 5Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**-- I have a sister or brother with diabetes.-- My family background is African American,Hispanic/Latino, American Indian, Asian American,or Pacific Islander.-- I had diabetes while I was pregnant (gestationaldiabetes), or I gave birth to a baby weighing 9pounds or more.
  7. 7. 6Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**-- I am physically active less than three times aweek.It is important to find out early if you haveprediabetes or type 2 diabetes, because earlytreatment can prevent serious problems thatdiabetes can cause, such as loss of eyesight orkidney damage.
  8. 8. 7Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**Find out if you could have prediabetes by takingthe screening test on this page. If the test showsyou could have prediabetes, talk to a health careprovider as soon as possible.If you are 45 years of age or older, you shouldconsider getting a blood test from a health careprovider for prediabetes and diabetes, especially ifyou are overweight.
  9. 9. 8Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**If your test results indicate you have prediabetesyou should enroll in an evidence-based lifestyleprogram to lower your chances of getting type 2diabetes. Studies show that people withprediabetes can prevent or delay type 2 diabetesby losing 5% to 7% of their weight—that is 10 to 14pounds for a 200-pound person. Weight lossshould be achieved by making lasting lifestylechanges to improve nutrition and increase physicalactivity.
  10. 10. 9Overview**Prediabetes: Am I at risk?**If your blood test showed you have prediabetesyou should also have your blood glucose (bloodsugar) levels checked again in 6 months to 1 year.
  11. 11. 107 steps to prevent diabetes**Move more**Get up, get out, and get moving. Try walking,dancing, bike riding, swimming, or playing ball withyour friends or family. It doesnt matter what youdo as long as you enjoy it. Try different things soyou don’t get bored.
  12. 12. 117 steps to prevent diabetes**Eat the healthy plate way**Focus on eating less and making healthyfood choices. Try to eat more fruits andvegetables (5 to 9 servings a day), dried beans,andwhole grains. Cut down on fatty and fried foods.You still can eat the foods you enjoy, just eatless. See other side for an example of a healthyplate.
  13. 13. 127 steps to prevent diabetes**Take off some weight**Once you start eating less and moving more, youwill lose weight. By losing even 10 pounds, you cancut your chances of getting diabetes.
  14. 14. 137 steps to prevent diabetes**Set goals you can meet**Start by making small changes. Try being active for15 minutes a day this week. Then each week add 5minutes until you build up to 30 minutes 5 days aweek. Try to cut 100 calories out of your diet eachday (that’s one can of soda!). Slowly reduce yourcalories over time. Talk to your health care teamabout your goals.
  15. 15. 147 steps to prevent diabetes**Record your progress**Write down all the things you eat and drink andthe number of minutes you are active. Keeping adiary is one of the best ways to lose weightand keep it off.
  16. 16. 157 steps to prevent diabetes**Get help**You don’t have to prevent diabetes alone. Askyour family and friends to help you out. Involvethem in your activities. You can help each othermove more, eat less, and live a healthier life. Thereare groups in your area that can help, as well asyour health care team.
  17. 17. 167 steps to prevent diabetes**Keep at it **Making even small changes is hard in thebeginning.Try adding one new change a week. Ifyou get off track, start again and keep at it.
  18. 18. 17Testing and Risks**When should I be tested for diabetes?**Anyone aged 45 years or older should considergetting tested for diabetes, especially if you areoverweight. If you are younger than 45, but areoverweight and have one or more additional riskfactors (see below), you should consider gettingtested.
  19. 19. 18Testing and Risks**What are the risk factors which increase thelikelihood of developing diabetes?**-- Being overweight or obese.-- Having a parent, brother, or sister with diabetes.
  20. 20. 19Testing and Risks**What are the risk factors which increase thelikelihood of developing diabetes?**-- Being African American, American Indian, AsianAmerican, Pacific Islander, or HispanicAmerican/Latino heritage.-- Having a prior history of gestational diabetes orbirth of at least one baby weighing more than 9pounds.-- Having high blood pressure measuring 140/90 orhigher.
  21. 21. 20Testing and Risks**What are the risk factors which increase thelikelihood of developing diabetes?**-- Having abnormal cholesterol with HDL ("good")cholesterol is 35 or lower, or triglyceride level is250 or higher.-- Being physically inactive—exercising fewer thanthree times a week.-- For more information, see the National DiabetesInformation Clearinghouse’s Am I at Risk for Type 2Diabetes?
  22. 22. 21Weight and Diabetes**How does body weight affect the likelihood ofdeveloping diabetes?**Being overweight or obese is a leading risk factorfor type 2 diabetes. Being overweight can keepyour body from making and using insulin properly,and can also cause high blood pressure. TheDiabetes Prevention Program (DPP), a majorfederally funded study of 3,234 people at high riskfor diabetes, showed that moderate diet andexercise of about 30 minutes or more, 5 or moredays per week, or of 150 or more minutes perweek, resulting in a 5% to 7% weight loss can delayand possibly prevent typ

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