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http://www.fitango.com/categories.php?id=621Fitango EducationHealth TopicsCutting back
1Tips on how to cut backSmall changes can make a big difference inreducing your chances of having alcohol-relatedproblems....
2Tips on how to cut backCounting and MeasuringKnow the standard drinksizes so you can count your drinks accurately (seebac...
3Tips on how to cut backSetting GoalsDecide how many days a week youwant to drink and how many drinks you’ll have onthose ...
4Tips on how to cut backno more than 14 drinks in a week.For healthy women (and healthy men over age65) no more than 3 dri...
5Tips on how to cut backPacing and SpacingWhen you do drink, paceyourself. Sip slowly. Have no more than one drinkwith alc...
6Tips on how to cut backAvoiding “Triggers”What triggers your urge todrink? If certain people or places make you drinkeven...
7Tips on how to cut backPlanning to Handle UrgesWhen an urge hits,consider these options: Remind yourself of yourreasons f...
8Tips on how to cut backKnowing Your “No”You’re likely to be offered adrink at times when you don’t want one. Have apolite...
9Tips on how to cut backWhat’s a Standard DrinkIn the United States, astandard drink is any drink that contains about 14gr...
10Tips on how to cut backtable wine80-proof spiritsgin, vodka, whisky, etc.˜ 5% alcohol:12 oz.˜ 7% alcohol:
11Tips on how to cut back8.5 oz.˜ 12% alcohol:5 oz.˜ 40% alcohol:1.5 oz.
12Tips on how to cut backMany people don’t know what counts as astandard drink and so don’t realize how manystandard drink...
13Tips on how to cut back40 oz. = 3.3For malt liquor, the approximate number ofstandard drinks in12 oz. = 1.522 oz. = 2.51...
14Tips on how to cut backFor table wine, the approximate number ofstandard drinks ina standard 750-mL (25-oz.)bottle = 5Fo...
15Tips on how to cut back1.75 L (59 oz.) = 39
16Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**Alcohol abuse4 is a pattern o...
17Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**Failure to fulfill major resp...
18Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**Continued drinking despite on...
19Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**A strong craving for alcohol....
20What does it mean to getdrunk?“Getting drunk” or intoxicated is the result ofconsuming excessive amounts of alcohol. Bin...
21What does it mean to getdrunk?Impaired brain function resulting in poorjudgment, reduced reaction time, loss of balancea...
22What does it mean to getdrunk?Increased risk of certain cancers, stroke, and liverdiseases (e.g., cirrhosis), particular...
23What does it mean to getdrunk?Coma and death can occur if alcohol is consumedrapidly and in large amounts.
Cutting back
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Cutting back

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Small changes can make a big difference in reducing your chances of having alcohol-related problems. Here are some strategies to try. Check off some to try the first week, and add some others the next.Keeping TrackKeep track of how much you drink. Find a way that works for you, such as a 3x5” card in your wallet, check marks on a kitchen calendar, or a personal digital assistant. If you make note of each drink before you drink it, this will help you slow down when needed.
Counting and MeasuringKnow the standard drink sizes so you can count your drinks accurately (see back page). One standard drink is 12 ounces of regular beer, 8 to 9 ounces of malt liquor, 5 ounces of table wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80–proof spirits. Measure drinks at home. Away from home, especially with mixed drinks, it can be hard to keep track and at times you may be getting more alcohol than you think. With wine, you may need to ask the host or server not to “top off” a partially filled glass.
Setting GoalsDecide how many days a week you want to drink and how many drinks you’ll have on those days. It’s a good idea to have some days when you don’t drink. Drinking within the limits below reduces the chances of having an alcohol use disorder and related health problems.
For healthy men up to age 65 —no more than 4 drinks in a day AND
no more than 14 drinks in a week.
For healthy women (and healthy men over age 65) no more than 3 drinks in a day AND
no more than 7 drinks in a week.
Depending on your health status, your doctor may advise you to drink less or abstain.
Pacing and SpacingWhen you do drink, pace yourself. Sip slowly. Have no more than one drink with alcohol per hour. Alternate “drink spacers” — non-alcoholic drinks such as water, soda, or juice — with drinks containing alcohol.
Including FoodDon’t drink on an empty stomach — have some food so the alcohol will be absorbed more slowly into your system.
Avoiding “Triggers”What triggers your urge to drink? If certain people or places make you drink even when you don’t want to, try to avoid them. If certain activities, times of day, or feelings trigger the urge, plan what you’ll do instead of drinking. If drinking at home is a problem, keep little or no alcohol there.
Planning to Handle UrgesWhen an urge hits, consider these options: Remind yourself of your reasons for changing. Or talk it through with someone you trust. Or get involved with a healthy, distracting activity. Or “urge surf ”— instead of fighting the feeling, accept it and ride it out, knowing that it will soon crest like a wave and pass.
Knowing Your “No”You’re likely to be offered a drink at times when you don’t want one. Have a polite, convincing “no, thanks” ready. The faster you can say no to these offers, the less likely you are to give in. If you hesitate, it allows time to think of excuses to go along.
What’s a Standard DrinkIn the United States, a standard drink is any drink that contains about 1

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Transcript of "Cutting back"

  1. 1. http://www.fitango.com/categories.php?id=621Fitango EducationHealth TopicsCutting back
  2. 2. 1Tips on how to cut backSmall changes can make a big difference inreducing your chances of having alcohol-relatedproblems. Here are some strategies to try. Checkoff some to try the first week, and add someothers the next.Keeping TrackKeep track of howmuch you drink. Find a way that works for you,such as a 3x5” card in your wallet, check marks ona kitchen calendar, or a personal digital assistant. Ifyou make note of each drink before you drink it,this will help you slow down when needed.
  3. 3. 2Tips on how to cut backCounting and MeasuringKnow the standard drinksizes so you can count your drinks accurately (seeback page). One standard drink is 12 ounces ofregular beer, 8 to 9 ounces of malt liquor, 5 ouncesof table wine, or 1.5 ounces of 80–proof spirits.Measure drinks at home. Away from home,especially with mixed drinks, it can be hard to keeptrack and at times you may be getting morealcohol than you think. With wine, you may needto ask the host or server not to “top off” a partiallyfilled g
  4. 4. 3Tips on how to cut backSetting GoalsDecide how many days a week youwant to drink and how many drinks you’ll have onthose days. It’s a good idea to have some dayswhen you don’t drink. Drinking within the limitsbelow reduces the chances of having an alcoholuse disorder and related health problems.For healthy men up to age 65 —no more than 4drinks in a day AND
  5. 5. 4Tips on how to cut backno more than 14 drinks in a week.For healthy women (and healthy men over age65) no more than 3 drinks in a day ANDno more than 7 drinks in a week.Depending on your health status, your doctor mayadvise you to drink less or abstain.
  6. 6. 5Tips on how to cut backPacing and SpacingWhen you do drink, paceyourself. Sip slowly. Have no more than one drinkwith alcohol per hour. Alternate “drink spacers” —non-alcoholic drinks such as water, soda, or juice— with drinks containing alcohol.Including FoodDon’t drink on an empty stomach —have some food so the alcohol will be absorbedmore slowly into your system.
  7. 7. 6Tips on how to cut backAvoiding “Triggers”What triggers your urge todrink? If certain people or places make you drinkeven when you don’t want to, try to avoid them. Ifcertain activities, times of day, or feelings triggerthe urge, plan what you’ll do instead of drinking. Ifdrinking at home is a problem, keep little or noalcohol there.
  8. 8. 7Tips on how to cut backPlanning to Handle UrgesWhen an urge hits,consider these options: Remind yourself of yourreasons for changing. Or talk it through withsomeone you trust. Or get involved with a healthy,distracting activity. Or “urge surf ”— instead offighting the feeling, accept it and ride it out,knowing that it will soon crest like a wave andpass.
  9. 9. 8Tips on how to cut backKnowing Your “No”You’re likely to be offered adrink at times when you don’t want one. Have apolite, convincing “no, thanks” ready. The fasteryou can say no to these offers, the less likely youare to give in. If you hesitate, it allows time to thinkof excuses to go along.
  10. 10. 9Tips on how to cut backWhat’s a Standard DrinkIn the United States, astandard drink is any drink that contains about 14grams of pure alcohol (about 0.6 fluid ounces or1.2 tablespoons). Below are U.S. standard drinkequivalents. These are approximate, since differentbrands and types of beverages vary in their actualalcohol content.beer or coolermalt liquor
  11. 11. 10Tips on how to cut backtable wine80-proof spiritsgin, vodka, whisky, etc.˜ 5% alcohol:12 oz.˜ 7% alcohol:
  12. 12. 11Tips on how to cut back8.5 oz.˜ 12% alcohol:5 oz.˜ 40% alcohol:1.5 oz.
  13. 13. 12Tips on how to cut backMany people don’t know what counts as astandard drink and so don’t realize how manystandard drinks are in the containers in whichthese drinks are often sold. Some examples:For beer, the approximate number of standarddrinks in12 oz. = 122 oz. = 216 oz. = 1.3
  14. 14. 13Tips on how to cut back40 oz. = 3.3For malt liquor, the approximate number ofstandard drinks in12 oz. = 1.522 oz. = 2.516 oz. = 240 oz. = 4.5
  15. 15. 14Tips on how to cut backFor table wine, the approximate number ofstandard drinks ina standard 750-mL (25-oz.)bottle = 5For 80-proof spirits, or “hard liquor,” theapproximate number of standard drinks ina mixeddrink = 1 or more*a fifth (25 oz.) = 17a pint (16 oz.) = 11
  16. 16. 15Tips on how to cut back1.75 L (59 oz.) = 39
  17. 17. 16Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**Alcohol abuse4 is a pattern of drinking that resultsin harm to one’s health, interpersonalrelationships, or ability to work. Manifestations ofalcohol abuse include the following:
  18. 18. 17Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**Failure to fulfill major responsibilities at work,school, or home.Drinking in dangerous situations, such as drinkingwhile driving or operating machinery.Legal problems related to alcohol, such as beingarrested for drinking while driving or for physicallyhurting someone while drunk.
  19. 19. 18Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**Continued drinking despite ongoing relationshipproblems that are caused or worsened by drinking.Long-term alcohol abuse can turn into alcoholdependence.Dependency on alcohol, also known as alcoholaddiction and alcoholism4, is a chronic disease.The signs and symptoms of alcohol dependenceinclude—
  20. 20. 19Alcoholism and alcohol abuse**What is the difference between alcoholism andalcohol abuse?**A strong craving for alcohol.Continued use despite repeated physical,psychological, or interpersonal problems.The inability to limit drinking.
  21. 21. 20What does it mean to getdrunk?“Getting drunk” or intoxicated is the result ofconsuming excessive amounts of alcohol. Bingedrinking typically results in acute intoxication.Alcohol intoxication can be harmful for a variety ofreasons, including—
  22. 22. 21What does it mean to getdrunk?Impaired brain function resulting in poorjudgment, reduced reaction time, loss of balanceand motor skills, or slurred speech.Dilation of blood vessels causing a feeling ofwarmth but resulting in rapid loss of body heat.
  23. 23. 22What does it mean to getdrunk?Increased risk of certain cancers, stroke, and liverdiseases (e.g., cirrhosis), particularly whenexcessive amounts of alcohol are consumed overextended periods of time.Damage to a developing fetus if consumed bypregnant women.Increased risk of motor-vehicle traffic crashes,violence, and other injuries.
  24. 24. 23What does it mean to getdrunk?Coma and death can occur if alcohol is consumedrapidly and in large amounts.
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