Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Biking
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Biking

170

Published on

Cycling is the use of bicycles for …

Cycling is the use of bicycles for
transport, recreation or sport. This topic will give you information on how to cycle safely, tips on how to improve your performance and plans that will enable you to log your training.

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
170
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. http://www.fitango.com/categories.php?id=574Fitango EducationHealth TopicsBiking
  • 2. 1OverviewCycling is the use of bicycles fortransport, recreation or sport. This topic will giveyou information on how to cycle safely, tips onhow to improve your performance and plans thatwill enable you to log your training.
  • 3. 2Biking to workWhile there are many advantages to bikingto work, what about the logistics? How do bikerscarry their “stuff,”factor in the extra time needed to shower andchange clothes at work, run
  • 4. 3Biking to workerrands after work (like grocery shopping), letalone manage to pick up a childfrom school? For many people, biking to work issimply not feasible. But forthose who really want to, there are creative waysaround these challenges.Schubauer-Berigan lives seven miles from
  • 5. 4Biking to workwork, and it takes her about 35 minutes to bike toHamilton. She is gratefulthat CDC has health and fitness facilities, enablingher to take a shower andchange clothes after biking to work in the morning.She doesn’t bike to work
  • 6. 5Biking to workevery day because she needs at least one day aweek to “haul in the heavystuff.” Two packs on the rear of her bike canaccommodate her groceries (when shemakes a stop after work) and also carry a changeof clothes and other items.
  • 7. 6Biking to workShe keeps toiletries and a pair of work shoes in alocker at work. Encryptedflash drives on the Citgo network enable her tominimize the paperwork that sheneeds to carry home on the one day a week whenshe teleworks.
  • 8. 7Biking to work**Avoiding the Pitfalls**Perhaps the greatest challenges that bikersface—are drivers on the road. Bikers generallycategorize three major areas ofdifficulty: When a driver sideswipes a biker whiletrying to pass; “dooring”—when
  • 9. 8Biking to work**Avoiding the Pitfalls**someone who’s parallel parked on the street openstheir driver side door; andwhen a driver coming from the opposite directionwrongly makes a turn directlyin front of a cyclist, causing the biker to swerve andpossibly lose control.
  • 10. 9Biking to work**Avoiding the Pitfalls**Cyclists are advised to protect themselvesby not hugging the curb. When bikers ride close tothe curb, drivers tend tosqueeze in between the center line and the cyclist,and that can cause acollision.
  • 11. 10Biking to work**Avoiding the Pitfalls**Some drivers don’t know how to react to acyclist on the road or how to drive around them.Most cyclists would adviseauto drivers to slow down and be patient. Wait foran opportunity to pass abiker and allow plenty of room. Treat the bike as ifit were a slow-moving
  • 12. 11Biking to work**Avoiding the Pitfalls**vehicle, and don’t honk the horn, as that can bedistracting.Cyclists are often their own worst enemy,says Schubauer-Berigan, when they don’t adhereto the traffic laws or when theydrive recklessly, such as weaving in between cars.“When I ride with other
  • 13. 12Biking to work**Avoiding the Pitfalls**people, we’re sticklers about following all thetraffic rules, stopping behinda car at an intersection, just as if we were anothercar. Now, that also meansthat we’re dependent on drivers behind us to treatus kindly, as it takes alittle while for us to get going.”
  • 14. 13Safety tips**Safety Tips:**-- Ride in a straight line, obey traffic signsand signals, and do not weave in and out of traffic.Riding predictably reducesyour chances of a crash with a motor vehicle.
  • 15. 14Safety tips**Safety Tips:**-- Look, signal and look again beforechanging lanes or making a turn. Establish eyecontact with drivers. Seeing adriver is often not enough. Make sure drivers seeyou before executing a turnor riding in front of a turning car.
  • 16. 15Safety tips**Safety Tips:**-- Watch out for car doors. Be prepared forthe possibility that a car door may be opened inyour path. When possible,leave room between yourself and parked cars (3feet is generally recommended)so that you can avoid a door that opensunexpectedly.
  • 17. 16Safety tips**Safety Tips:**-- Stay visible. Wear brightly coloredclothing for daytime riding. At night, use reflectivematerials and lights.-- Use Your bell. Your bell alerts drivers,pedestrians and other cyclists to your presence, itis required by law.
  • 18. 17Safety tips**Safety Tips:**-- Dont wear earphones. By law you may wearone earbud, but keeping your ears clear is a muchsafer choice.-- Wear a helmet. Helmets are required by lawfor children age 13 or younger and workingcyclists, helmets are a good idea
  • 19. 18Safety tips**Safety Tips:**for cyclists of all ages.

×