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Woodward 5 Community Sustainability Collaboration

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Five cities are collaborating to foster interconnectedness, sustainability, and diversity, resulting in many shared assets including: …

Five cities are collaborating to foster interconnectedness, sustainability, and diversity, resulting in many shared assets including:

- A prosperous business climate
- High levels of employment and education
- Thriving downtown and commercial areas
- Engaged residents
- Mature, vibrant neighborhoods

How are they making this happen? Here is a report that details the planning process and quantitative indicators used as a baseline for measuring progress.

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  • 1. Over the course of the planning process, public input was sought through a variety of forums, including: Sustainability Advisory Board: Representatives from community, environmental, business, health, education, and local government organizations. Public Meetings: Two meetings were held to receive direct input from the public. Surveys: Several surveys of government staff, elected officials, and the public were administered to gain broader input on the planning framework. Woodward 5 Sustainability Collaboration Woodward 5 Communities Vision The Woodward 5 communities, collaboration comprised of the cities of Berkley, Ferndale, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge, and Royal Oak, embarked on a joint effort to develop a collaborative Sustainability Partnership. This effort was led by a team from Oakland County’s Department of Economic Development and Community Affairs and funded by a grant from the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality (MDEQ) through its Pollution Prevention Program. The Woodward 5 Sustainability Partnership communities have a history of collaboration and share many assets, including a prosperous business climate, high levels of employment and education, strong downtown and commercial areas, engaged residents, and mature vibrant neighborhoods. The Woodward 5 stakeholders developed a collective vision for sustainability: Empowering our communities to collaborate to make the Woodward 5 an interconnected, sustainable, diverse place to live, work, play, and learn. Sustainability Planning Sustainability prepares people and communities to thrive now and in the future by balancing the Triple Bottom Line of environmental, economic, and community values. CommunityEconomy Environment Sustainability
  • 2. The Sustainability Planning Process Through the sustainability planning process, Woodward 5 community stakeholders identified actions requiring collaboration between city governments and community members, as well as actions which should be led by community and civic organizations. Additionally, communities rely on an infrastructure of existing private, non- profit, or institutional organizations which contribute to a sustainable future. Woodward 5 focused on the challenges faced by its communities and the actions it can take to confront their unique sustainability challenges: community, economic, and environmental. The process included articulation of a vision, goals, and outcomes for sustainability. A set of quantitative indicators were identified to measure baseline and progress for these goals into the future. Finally, the communities identified current and future actions that will move the needle on sustainability. Vision An image or description of what the community desires to become in the future. Outcomes Descriptions of the specific “end states” a community wants to achieve. Indicators A measurable, standardized, quantitative value that accurately measures progress toward outcomes. Baseline Base measurements for indicators, from which point progress will be measured. Targets Specific, measurable goal or direction for desired change from the baseline indicator measurement. Actions Projects, plans, or activities accomplished to achieve a stated outcome. Stakeholders People and organizations responsible for planning and implementing actions. Sustainability Planning Process Tool Kit Oakland County City Staff FTC&H WARM Sustainability Steering Committee Sustainability Advisory Board Government Business Education Environment Community Health Oakland County Ferndale Sustainability Planning Process Royal Oak Berkley Collaborative Local Government Sustainability Planning Framework Definitions Vision Triple Bottom Line Goals Outcomes Indicators and Baselines Targets and Actions Huntington Woods Pleasant RIdge Collaborative Sustainability Plan
  • 3. Action Key Partner Time Frame Healthy Community Well Educated Diverse Community Civic and Social Engagement Arts and Cultural Engagement City-ledActions Work with Oakland County to better publicize available health resources Oakland County 2015 Encourage development of new Welcome Wagon program Community Organizations 2015 Develop and maintain collaborative Woodward 5 event calendar Community Organizations 2015 Community-ledActions Hold community organization open house/roundtable Community Organizations 2018 Organize Woodward 5 annual event (to celebrate community diversity) Michigan Roundtable for Diversity and Inclusion 2020+ Develop and maintain community gardens Community Organizations 2018 Action Key Partner Time Frame Fiscal Sustainability Economic Development Friendly Economic Diversity Services and Infrastructure Economic Prosperity City-LedActions Establish and maintain community-wide WiFi Chamber of Commerce/DDA 2018 Recruit businesses Michigan Economic Development Corp 2018 Institute an underutilized equipment sharing program Chamber of Commerce 2018 Community-LedActions Develop and support business incubators Businesses 2020+ Improve alignment between job growth sectors and school curriculums Chamber of Commerce 2018 Use crowd source financing for public project (i.e., parks) Citizens 2018 Action Key Partner Time Frame Quality Air and Water Green Infrastructure Energy Efficiency Sustainable Transportation Waste City-ledActions Develop a W5 park and greenspace resource map Non-profit 2018 Develop a map of routes and “bridges” to connect communities Oakland County Planning 2020+ Coordinate bike route signage for continuity amongst communities Oakland County Planning 2018 Community-LedActions Advocate for a complete regional bus system Regional Transit Authority 2015 Encourage green infrastructure through workshops, seminars, and advocacy Conservation groups, SEMCOG, Oakland County 2018 Develop and deliver sustainability education for businesses and residents Environmental Commissions 2018 Collaboration For a full list, please view the entire report at www.ftch.com/woodward5 Economy Environment Community
  • 4. Community Why does it matter? A sustainable community honors and engages its citizens, fostering a sense of connection and place based on a celebration of history, culture and diversity. Baseline** Target* Arts& Cultural Engagement Number of Events (Total number of events) 80 Attendance at Events (Total attendance) 390,476 Arts and Culture Program Spending (Percent public funds) 5% Well-Educated Residents with Bachelor's Degree or Higher (Percent population) 45% W5 Public Schools Racial Diversity (Scale of 0 to 100; All students K-12, combined W5 Districts) 51.7 High School Graduation Rates (Percent students in 4-year cohort, combined W5 Districts) 91.2% Healthy Community Walkability (Percent residential parcels within 1/4 mile of a commercial parcel) 76% Recreational Pathways (Miles of trail per square mile) 6.0 Transit Access (Percent residential and business units within 1/4 mile of a bus stop) 33% DiverseCommunity Affordability (Percent income used for housing [ownership] based on regional median income) 35% Racial Diversity Index (0-100) 18.38 Same-Sex Households (Percent households) 0.9% Where we are and where we are going 1 Diverse Community: Ethnic, religious, age and cultural diversity of residents and business owners is welcomed, celebrated, and protected. 2 Healthy Community: Communities feature many opportunities and facilities to allow residents to engage in physical activity and care for their health. 3 Well-Educated Community: Residents are well-educated. Educational institutions in the communities have a range of offerings to meet diverse needs. 4 Strong civic and social activity and engagement: Businesses and residents are actively involved in civic life through service, school organizations, and political participation. 5 Strong engagement with science, arts, historical cultural programs and institutions: Multiple opportunities exist within the community to participate in cultural and education opportunities through partnerships with relevant institutions. Outcomes Sustainability Indicators * In the target column, arrows denote desired direction. For more information on baselines, including benchmarks, standards, and comparisons, please view the full report at www.ftch.com/Woodward5 ** Baseline years are predominantly 2010.
  • 5. Community Woodward 5 Sustainability Collaboration A collaborative project between Berkley, Ferndale, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge, and Royal Oak. For the full report, please visit www.ftch.com/woodward5 Design courtesy of engineers | scientists | architects | constructors What we are doing Berkley Inclusionary zoning to encourage affordable housing Frequent online updates using websites, e-newsletters, and social media Ferndale Diversity training for all staff Partner in Eight Mile Boulevard Association Huntington Woods First local Human Rights Ordinance in Oakland County Active City Art Gallery and Cultural Center Pleasant Ridge Pleasant Ridge Recreation Center Joint recreation program with Oakland County Royal Oak Royal Oak Farmer's Market Woodward Dream Cruise WHEN Berkley Adopt a community-wide anti-idling policy. 2015 Require or encourage a Health Impact Assessment to evaluate the public health impacts of projects, policies, or programs. 2018 Ferndale Assess local community for language needs and effective venues for City communications. 2015 Downtown Ferndale Smartphone application 2015 Huntington Woods Install bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure to facilitate biking and walking to multiple land uses. 2020+ Provide reduced-cost opportunities to access local cultural institutions. 2015 Pleasant Ridge Conduct walkability, bikability, and road safety audits around key destination area, and develop and implement a plan to address deficiencies. 2018 Make public art a priority in capital improvement projects. 2018 Royal Oak Incorporate measures of citizen satisfaction into budgets and service provision decisions 2018 Consider public arts and culture in capital improvement projects. 2020+ What we are planning For More Information Contact Whitney Calio 2100 N. Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford, MI 48328 (248) 858-2071
  • 6. Baseline** Target* Economic Diversity Young Professionals (Percent population age 24-35 with Bachelor's Degree) 68% Management, Business, Science, and Arts Occupations (Percent workforce employed in management, business, science, and arts occupations) 51% Commercial, Office and Industrial Parcels within 1/4 mile of a Bus Stop (Percent units measured along road network) 75% Economic Prosperity Resident Income (Per household) 62,942 Income Disparity (Gini index) 0.40 FiscalSustainability General Fund Balance (Percent fund balance vs. general fund expenditures) 21.9% Municipal Bond Rating A+ to AA+ Tax Base Diversity (Percent assessed value) Residential 84% Residential Vacant 0% Commercial/Office 12% Commercial/Office Vacant 0% Industrial 3% Industrial Vacant 0% Other 0% Services Infrastructure Condition of Roads (Percent mile lanes in poor condition) 15% Cost of Public Services (USD per household) $2,685.48 Economy Where we are and where we are going Why does it matter? A sustainable community supports a robust business climate, residents who are economically secure and well-educated, and training, mentorship, and educational opportunities available to all. Outcomes 1 Efficient High-Quality Services and Infrastructure: City services are high quality and transparently and efficiently delivered. Infrastructure is maintained in good condition and improvements are completed on time and on budget. 2 Fiscal Sustainability: Local government maintains a balanced budget, defined as: funded liabilities; stable and diverse tax base; competitive tax rates; and accurate forecasting. 3 Economic Development Friendly: Local business activity is encouraged through consistent and straightforward regulatory and procedural requirements. Applications are processed in a timely manner. 4 Economic Prosperity: Businesses and residents are financially stable resulting in low vacancy rates. 5 Economic Diversity: Businesses and residents represent a diversity of sectors, income levels, and life stages. Sustainability Indicators Residential Industrial Commercial/ Office * In the target column, arrows denote desired direction. For more information on baselines, including benchmarks, standards, and comparisons, please view the full report at www.ftch.com/Woodward5 ** Baseline years are predominantly 2010.
  • 7. Economy What we are doing Berkley Basic building permits issued in 48 hours No escrow accounts required for site plan or development reviews Ferndale Information technology needs coordinated with Oakland County Updated Master Plan, 0rdinances, tax- increment financing information, and forms available online Huntington Woods Improved workforce flexibility through cross- training and job rotation Conducting a study for public safety services sharing between other Woodward 5 communities Pleasant Ridge Coordinate library services with Huntington Woods Coordinate water and sewer maintenance services with Royal Oak Royal Oak Participate in Michigan Intergovernmental Trade Network Participate in Woodward Avenue Action Association Woodward 5 Sustainability Collaboration A collaborative project between Berkley, Ferndale, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge, and Royal Oak. For the full report, please visit www.ftch.com/woodward5 Design courtesy of engineers | scientists | architects | constructors WHEN Berkley Establish a business liaison to act as a concierge between the business, county, state, and the City. 2015 Implement a main street type 4-point approach in downtown areas. 2018 Ferndale Develop non-motorized transportation and multi-modal plans. 2015 Revise zoning code to allow for more diverse neighborhoods, mixing small and large homes, to encourage resource sharing. 2020+ Huntington Woods Establish a regular meeting between City leadership and the local business community. 2015 Encourage greater diversity of housing choice along corridors 2020+ Pleasant Ridge Develop a place-based economic development program, identifying opportunities, resources, and promotional materials to leverage place as a marketing tool in attracting businesses. 2018 Work with neighboring local governments to harmonize permit processes and requirements, where feasible. 2018 Royal Oak Formalize asset management program into a plan. 2018 Make sustainability dashboard detailing fiscal, service, and sustainability performance metrics available on website. 2015 What we are planning For More Information Contact Whitney Calio 2100 N. Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford, MI 48328 (248) 858-2071
  • 8. Environment Why does it matter? A sustainable community features policies that promote green infrastructure, energy efficiency, recycling, and proper disposal of hazardous wastes. 1 Access to Sustainable Transportation Options: People can travel easily throughout the city and region without a car through non-motorized transportation (biking, walking) and efficient, timely public transportation. 2 Strong Green Infrastructure, Natural Resource Networks, and Outdoor Recreational Assets: The community has numerous, connected green spaces and parks that provide both recreational opportunities and ecological services. 3 Conservation of energy is energy efficient and uses alternative fuels: Governments, businesses, and residents lower their fossil fuel use. 4 Excellent Air and Water Quality: Air and water quality meets national standards. 5 Conservation of waste resources: Community members practice recycling, reuse, composting, and proper disposal of hazardous waste. Outcomes Sustainability Indicators - Combined Woodward 5 Communities Baseline** Target* Energy Efficiency LEED and Energy Star Certified Buildings (Number of buildings per 1,000 non-residential parcels) 0.77 Household Energy Use Natural Gas (Thousand cubic feet per 1,000 residents) 4.22 GreenInfrastructure Residential Parcels within 1/4 mile of Public Recreation Land (percent units measured along road network) 80% Active Parkland (Acres per 1,000 residents) 9.08 Public Recreation Funding (USD per resident) $47.69 Tree Canopy Coverage (percent Area) 26% Transportation Walkability (percent residential parcels within 1/4 mile of a commercial parcel) 76% Transit Access (Percent residential and business units within 1/4 mile of a bus stop) 33% Recreational Pathways (Miles of trail per square mile) 6.0 People Biking or Walking to Work (percent population) 2% Waste Residential Recycling Ratio (Ratio of pounds of waste recycled per household to pounds sent to landfill) 0.2 $ $ $$ Where we are and where we are going * In the target column, arrows denote desired direction. For more information on baselines, including benchmarks, standards, and comparisons, please view the full report at www.ftch.com/Woodward5 ** Baseline years are predominantly 2010.
  • 9. Environment What we are doing Berkley Green infrastructure planning incorporated into the City's Master Plan Energy tracking and management systems for municipal buildings Ferndale No idling policy for City vehicles Developed City-wide traffic management and calming program Huntington Woods Single-stream recycling pilot program participant Weatherization program for commercial and residential properties Pleasant Ridge Composting collection for City residents Participate in SMART's Bike Rack program Royal Oak Road safety is continuously evaluated through road safety audits, signal synchronization, access management, and crash evaluation A healthy urban forest and street trees are maintained Woodward 5 Sustainability Collaboration A collaborative project between Berkley, Ferndale, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge, and Royal Oak. For the full report, please visit www.ftch.com/woodward5 Design courtesy of engineers | scientists | architects | constructors WHEN Berkley Low impact development techniques to manage stormwater in new and redevelopment projects where feasible. 2015 Provide electric vehicle charging stations in public areas. 2018 Ferndale Install recycling receptacles on sidewalks and in highly trafficked areas. 2018 LED streetlight conversion in downtown area. 2018 Huntington Woods Reduce use of bottled water at City events and venues. 2015 Expand the quantity of materials diverted/ recycled from solid waste stream. 2018 Pleasant Ridge Expand local trolley program. 2018 Develop additional on-road bike facilities (bike lanes, sharrows) and bike parking infrastructure in downtown, commercial, and park destinations. 2020+ Royal Oak Implement construction site management and minimization of environmental impacts. 2020+ Promote a biologically diverse landscape in parks. 2020+ What we are planning For More Information Contact Whitney Calio 2100 N. Pontiac Lake Road, Waterford, MI 48328 (248) 858-2071
  • 10. Sustainability Steering Committee Jane Bais-DiSessa City of Berkley April McGrath City of Ferndale Alex Allie City of Huntington Woods Sherry Ball City of Pleasant Ridge Don Johnson City of Royal Oak Nina Misuraca Ignaczak Oakland County Bret Rasegan Oakland County Michele Buckler FTCH Joel Howrani Heeres WARM Training Center City Government Support Phil O’Dwyer Mayor, City of Berkley Dave Coulter Mayor, City of Ferndale Ron Gillham Mayor, City of Huntington Woods Ralph Castelli Mayor, City of Pleasant Ridge Jim Ellison Mayor, City of Royal Oak Sustainability Advisory Board Ann Heller Ferncare Carmine Palombo SEMCOG Dave Coulter City of Ferndale Gary Meier Ferndale Schools Janet Turner City of Huntington Woods Jeff McKeen SOCRRA/SOCWA Jennifer Roosenburg Ferndale Chamber of Commerce Joe Rozell City of Huntington Woods John Iacoangeli Beckett and Raeder We would like to thank all who have served on the SSC and SAB, as well as those residents and business owners who have participated in the planning process.Thank You For More Information Contact Whitney Calio, Environmental Program Coordinator 2100 N. Pontiac Lake Road Waterford, MI 48328 (248) 858-2071 Woodward5 Sustainability Collaboration A collaborative project between Berkley, Ferndale, Huntington Woods, Pleasant Ridge, and Royal Oak. For the full report, please visit www.ftch.com/woodward5 Design courtesy of engineers | scientists | architects | constructors Prosperity Climate FUTURE EARTH community SUSTAINABILITY Sustainability Advisory Board Cont. Lea Luger Yad Ezra Lisa Platt Auensen City of Berkley Lloyd Crews Oakland Community College Maureen Elliott Beaumont Health System Michael Kulka PM Environmental Patricia Capello City of Royal Oak Paul R. Good Detroit Zoo Ralph Castelli City of Pleasant Ridge Ronald Gillham City of Huntington Woods Scott Pietrzak City of Pleasant Ridge Shelly Kemp Royal Oak Chamber of Commerce Stewart Meek City of Royal Oak Woodward 5 Royal Oak Berkley Huntington Woods Pleasant Ridge Ferndale W OODW ARD AVENUE 75 696

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