Low Impact Design Techniques
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Low Impact Design Techniques

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LID techniques store, filter, and soak up water where it falls to mimic...

LID techniques store, filter, and soak up water where it falls to mimic
nature and reduce the amount of water entering storm drains. In this way,
LID prevents polluted storm water from entering our rivers and lakes, and can help conserve water.

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Low Impact Design Techniques Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Many low impact design (LID) techniques, when Examples of LID techniques are listedcorrectly applied, can help conserve water. below.What is Water Runoff? Nine LID TechniquesWhen it rains, storm water flows over lawns, streets, and parking lotscarrying with it road dirt, fertilizers, oil, and grease into storm drains, 1 Infiltration Trenchwhich are located alongside streets and parking lots. Infiltration trenches have a broad, gently sloped channel with a stone layer. Storm water runoff is directed to the trench where it infiltrates into the soil. Green Roof 2 Green roofs are covered with grasses, ground cover, or even trees. They absorb rainfall, extend a roof’s life, and reduce heating costs. Storm Water Reuse 3 Storm water reuse is the recycling of rainwater. Storm water is stored for irrigation or other uses. Through its collection and reuse, storm water does not have to be dumped into the storm sewer. 4 Porous Asphalt Porous asphalt has spaces that let rainwater soak into the soil. This eliminates puddles and icy patches in the winter. 5 Porous ConcreteWhere do Storm Drains Lead? Porous concrete has spaces that let rainwater soak into the soil. It hasStorm drains lead directly to nearby rivers and lakes without any type more stone than traditional pavements creating a “bumpy” surface.of treatment, carrying fertilizers, oils, and other runoff into these bodies Oil and Grit Separatorof water. 6 Oil and grit separators are treatment units usually inserted into stormWhat is LID? drains to remove storm water pollutants (including road dirt, oil, grease,LID techniques store, filter, and soak up water where it falls to mimic and debris).nature and reduce the amount of water entering storm drains. In this way,LID prevents polluted storm water from entering our rivers and lakes. Rain Garden/Bioretention 7 Rain gardens/ bioentention areas have a shallow dip at the center to collect, filter, and soak up rainwater. They are planted with native shrubs,What can I do to conserve water? wildflowers, and grasses, which need less fertilizer and water than non-native plants.– Plant a rain garden 7 to capture rainwater. Rain Barrel– Use rain barrels 8 to capture and reuse rainwater from your roof. 8 Rain barrels capture rainwater from roof drains. This water can then be used to water lawns and gardens. Pavers 9 Pavers allow rainwater to soak into the soil. Install pavers, instead of traditional pavement, to create walkways in yards or gardens.