Information Literacy Learning Object UCLA

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Info literacy learning object.

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Information Literacy Learning Object UCLA

  1. 1. By: Claire LaPolt & Faisal Ansari “The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.” --Stephen Hawking
  2. 2. -To gather information to answer a question that solves a problem. -Research is a solution to solving practical problems.
  3. 3. When beginning the information-seeking process: 1) What do I know? 2) What do I need to know? 3) How will I find out?
  4. 4. Step 1: State your Topic: I am trying to learn about ______________. Step 2: Add a Question: I am studying X because I want to find out who/what/where/when/why/how ___________________. Step 3: Motivate your Question: I am studying LC subject headings because I want to find out how controlled vocabularies work.
  5. 5. Increasing Specificity (i.e. Narrowing Your Topic!) Topic: “Abortion” -- Meaningful topic or Meaningless topic? Areas of Inquiry– Name 2 distinct areas of inquiry surrounding the topic of abortion. Example: religion, Roe vs. Wade
  6. 6. Using this next diagram, YOU will learn to develop a research question that is open-ended and gives meaning to the topic you will be researching.
  7. 7. Lastly- Remember that we can easily slip into biases and assumptions while Researching and choosing a topic. I.E. “Steroids being synonymous with all American sports. For that reason we suggest that you define your research topic With objective data such as clearly defining your question. For example: Topic= Pregnancy Who- Women between 18-45 What= Pregnancy and smoking cessation amongst women between 18-45 And there you are !
  8. 8. Sources: Burkhardt, J. M., MacDonald, M. C., & Rathemacher, A. J. (2010). Teaching information literacy: 50 standards-based exercises for college students. Chicago: American Library Association.

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