Fiona Marshall Modes conference September 2013

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  • Crowdsourcing – getting help, building links
  • MODES web server
  • MODES online: British Dental Association Museum
  • MODES online: Egypt Centre Swansea
  • eHive
  • Note the option for web visitors to add their own tags…
  • … and comments
  • E-Hive Wordpress site
  • Good text – great object
  • Note the ‘friendly’ text ‘story’
  • This is the other version, using the BM’s catalogue data. More researcher orientated.Should consider audience need and whether to put online:A few objects in depth orAll objects in less depth?
  • Currently thought to be one of the best collections information websites: high quality images, great metadata, API.Note the Help and other guidance at the bottom of the screen.
  • Note the poor quality image (& the next slide)
  • Great example of crowdsourcing
  • Cooper HewittNote invitations to submit info and link to Cooper Hewitt’s objects
  • Many large museums outsource sales of their images, both prints and digital imagesMemoryprints and Magnolia Box and Media Storehouse are main examples. Also Internova.Specialise in e-commerce and understand and attract a much larger audience than a small museum website. Also deal with time consuming printing, packaging and delivery.Companies may set up the museum’s site for free and take a percentage of the sales income.Talk to others about income from sales
  • Good place to find great examples of digital engagement in museums
  • Art North Carolina: a Best of the Web award winnerNote the Concept maps
  • UK Learning portal.
  • Learning resource linking NC to objects.
  • Overall winner of Best of Web 2013 (Museums & the Web conference).Note the Master Matcher – unconventional means of finding objects of interest – and ability to download large images and adapt them.
  • Partnerships and syndication
  • Note the tagging tool
  • Flickr has been used by museums to distribute images, but it’s also a good way to make contact with people who are interested enough in your museum/objects to photograph them. Can you get them even more involved?If you refer to object records on your website from social media, you must use persistent URLs.
  • WordPress blog.This site was voted Best Small Museum Project at the Museums and the Web conference 2011Run by volunteers with pretty much no budget. Marvellous example of integrating museum into local community.Most articles written by volunteers with minimal editing.Note that people can sign up to receive email updates.
  • Ashby filmed volunteers & local experts talking about some objects. Films are on YouTube with links to each film on Ashby’s website. QR codes next to the gallery label can be scanned by a mobile phone QR code reader to bring up the film.This work may bebased on a much larger US museum’s work, showing that even the smallest museum can apply ideas from larger institutions.
  • Much cheaper to build mobile compatibility in from the start than to add it later.
  • Scan the QR code to retrieve info on Wikipedia,eg…
  • Check your museumand highlights on WikipediaFind out what others are saying about your collections on Wikipedia and Flickr
  • This address also links to a list of social media metrics tools.
  • Great example of segmenting audiences and asking them about their motivation in visiting your website. Clicks can be counted and recorded and linked to eg Google Analytics metrics.(In practice, unfortunately people don’t seem to understand the differences between these categories and most click ‘Skip’ – so more work needed on segments?)
  • Use cases/user journeys through your site.The project syndrome…
  • Fiona Marshall Modes conference September 2013

    1. 1. Sharing collections information online Fiona Marshall
    2. 2.  People want to know what you have…  Public funding. ‘Open access’?  Participation and engagement 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 2
    3. 3.  Accuracy / completeness of data  Copyright  Sales potential of images  Time to respond to queries  Institutional policies  Maintenance and sustainability 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 3
    4. 4.  25-30% of website usage?  Improves your website ‘findability’  Increases dwell time on your site (Collections Trust) 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 4
    5. 5. http://collections.wordsworth.org.uk/wtweb/home.asp?page=Collections search 5
    6. 6. http://collections.wordsworth.org.uk/wtweb/home.asp?page=Collections search 6
    7. 7. http://www.bda-collection.org 7
    8. 8. 25 September 2013 http://www.egyptcentre.org.uk 8
    9. 9. 25 September 2013 http://ehive.com/account/4162 9
    10. 10. 25 September 2013 http://ehive.com/account/4162/object/189837/Church_group 10
    11. 11. 25 September 2013 http://ehive.com/account/4162/object/189837/Church_group 11
    12. 12. 25 September 2013 http://rugbymoments.net 12
    13. 13. 25 September 2013 http://rugbymoments.net/object/78633 13
    14. 14. http://www.britishmuseum.org/explore/highlights/highlight_objects/pe_mla/h/helmet_from_sutton_hoo.aspx 14
    15. 15. http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/search.aspx 15
    16. 16. 25 September 2013 http://collections.vam.ac.uk 16
    17. 17. http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O16718/queen-victoria-chromolithograph-nicholson-william-newzam 17
    18. 18. 25 September 2013 http://collections.vam.ac.uk/crowdsourcing 18
    19. 19. 25 September 2013 http://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18448667/ 19
    20. 20.  Most people don’t pay for most pictures  Where they do, it’s for specific iconic pictures for commercial use  Nobody makes money running a picture liby ◦ Make 90% freely available for sharing ◦ Look after the 8% that might have commercial potential and ◦ Focus licensing & distribution on the 2% that you know will generate revenue (Nick Poole, The Digital Agenda in Museums) 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 20
    21. 21. 25 September 2013 http://www.memoryprints.com/gallery/birmingham/1 21
    22. 22. 25 September 2013 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Best_of_the_Web_awards 22
    23. 23. 25 September 2013 http://artnc.org/ 23
    24. 24. 25 September 2013 http://www.mylearning.org/ 24
    25. 25. 25 September 2013 http://www.mylearning.org/rise-of-the-midland-railway-/p-3903/ 25
    26. 26. 25 September 2013 https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/rijksstudio 26
    27. 27. 25 September 2013 http://www.culturegrid.org.uk/ 27
    28. 28. 25 September 2013 http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/ 28
    29. 29. 25 September 2013 http://www.bbc.co.uk/arts/yourpaintings/ 29
    30. 30. 25 September 2013 http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/about/ 30
    31. 31. 25 September 2013 http://www.google.com/culturalinstitute/about/ 31
    32. 32.  Taking your information to places people go ◦ Wikipedia, Facebook, YouTube, Twitter  Making contact, communicating ◦ Blogs, Facebook, Twitter  What are people saying about your museum? ◦ Flickr, Twitter, Blogs etc etc… 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 32
    33. 33. 24th September 2013 http://dulwichonview.org.uk/ 33
    34. 34. 25 September 2013 http://ashbydelazouchmuseum.org.uk/Talking%20objects.html 34
    35. 35.  Collections information ◦ Mobile compatible ‘responsive’ websites ◦ QR codes / RFID / NFC / BLE  Gallery trails ◦ GPS , TAP, Everytrail etc  Visitors creating stuff about your collections ◦ Adding photos to Facebook/Twitter/Instagram 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 35
    36. 36. 25 September 2013 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Derby_Museum_visitor_uses_QR_Code.jpg 36
    37. 37. 25 September 2013 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Philosopher_Lecturing_on_the_Orrery 37
    38. 38.  % of V&A website visitors using mobiles: ◦ 9% in 2012, 18% 2013  V&A 2012: 60% museum visitors use their smartphone to access info about their visit  C.50% visitors travel with smartphones. ◦ 60% smartphone owners use them to take photos ◦ 50% to find more information  Tate: Some visitors strongly opposed to mobiles in the gallery  Tate et al: Many users expect same resources from mobile as website  Pattern differs between organisations  http://www.vam.ac.uk/b/blog/digital- media/museum-visitors-using-mobile 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 38
    39. 39.  Evaluating impact  Demand not supply: ◦ ‘we have these ceramics, how can we tell people about them and improve access to them?’ ◦ ‘lots of people are interested in pottery, how can we start a conversation about our shared knowledge [based] around our ceramics collection?’  Audience segmentation,motivation,behaviour  User testing  Issues with browsing collections information  http://weareculture24.org.uk/projects/action- research 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 39
    40. 40. 25 September 2013 https://wordsworth.org.uk/home.html 40
    41. 41.  Audience development strategy  Who are you targeting?  What are they doing? / What do they need?  Why would they be interested?  How will they use your stuff?  How will you evaluate?  How will you (continuously) improve? 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 41
    42. 42.  fiona@fionamarshall.co.uk  http://museumsdigital.wordpress.com/ 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 42
    43. 43.  http://www.hlf.org.uk/HowToApply/goodpra ctice/Pages/UsingDigitalTechnologyinHeritag eProjects.aspx#.UkL_dRlwZzk 25 September 2013Fiona Marshall 43

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